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How to Get Bad Credit Loans with Guaranteed Approval?

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How to Get Bad Credit Loans with Guaranteed Approval?

Are you have a poor credit score, and as a result you are hesitant to apply for a loan? It’s always best to be prepared as well as have the capacity to negotiate to be able to meet the requirements. Check your credit report and available assets that can be used to repay the loan. Look for deals that are most suitable for you and provide the best conditions few simple steps.

Access your credit report

There is always room for improvement but we need to do some extra preparation. So, look over the details of your credit report and check for areas that you could improve. Check for any errors and fix these. So, you can get low-interest rates.

In many cases, your credit history is the most important factor when receiving a loan. Based on your credit background, the lender can determine whether the borrower will have enough funds to pay back this loan in full or not. It is advised to examine your credit report at least three months prior to the date you apply for a loan.

Set a goal and plan well

Determine the amount you’ll have to borrow. Then, you should create an outline of how you will make all installments on time. Plan your budget and this includes all expenditures, savings, and debt payments. All of these contribute to the repayment of your loan.

Calculate how much you can save in order to repay a loan. then close the loan, and do it all on time. Keep in mind that long-term personal loans to those with poor credit will have more interest.

Check the rate of interest

Pay attention and be aware whenever you look up interest rates. Some companies might grab your attention through advertisements of low-interest rates, however, the truth could be completely different. Be cautious when you take in these ads. Also, be sure to read these terms of service lenders have set because of the often they refer to the interest rates they charge.

Beware of scams

Don’t be fooled by their claims! If you’re unfamiliar with this process, it will be simpler to set it up. Be aware of this that reputable and trustworthy lenders will be looking at your credit history and payment history. If they don’t inquire about the matter, don’t be able to trust them completely. If they’re a fraud lender, they’ll keep calling you on a regular basis. Therefore, be careful!

Make your payments smart

It is your obligation and obligation to make payments in time. This way, you’ll avoid any charges, penalties, or negative marks in the credit report, as well. If you incur additional charges that are not covered by the loan, its actual cost will increase, meaning the rates of interest you’ll pay will be higher.

Instant Personal Loans vs Other Personal Loan Options

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Trying to decide which personal loan option is best for you? Should you get a credit card or take out an instant personal loan? Personal Loan Apps are here to help you learn more about your personal borrowing options!


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H1: Instant personal loans vs. other personal borrowing options

How do credit cards work? Are instant personal loans different from personal lines of credit? what is a online loan application? These are all valid questions about personal borrowing. It’s good to be aware of your options so that when you need to take out a loan, you know which products and services best suit your needs.

Personal borrowing is an ever-changing landscape and we’re here to help you navigate it. Here’s our ultimate cheat sheet on all your personal borrowing options with everything you need to know about mortgages, payday loans, secured personal loans, and more!

H2: Instant Personal Loans

In today’s advanced digital age, financial services are becoming increasingly accessible and cutting-edge. Instant Personal Loans are one such product of the digital renaissance in the lending industry. While the traditional loan application and approval process took days to weeks, instant personal loans only take a day or two.

The fast disbursement makes it ideal for anyone in need of urgent funding. Moreover, the simple and straightforward procedure of instant personal loans along with the absence of any collateral make them a top choice for those looking for small loans.

Instant personal loans are granted by banks, non-bank financial companies and personal loan applications. As an online lending app, we provide easy access to loans for anyone with a smartphone.

H2: Credit cards

Credit cards are a popular and ubiquitous form of personal borrowing. There are a wide variety of credit cards available in the market and each of them has its own conditions and features. However, the general system remains the same. A credit card has a preset limit on the amount you can borrow. You are charged for anything you buy using the card and you must repay the balance in full each month.

If you have an outstanding balance, you will have to pay interest on it. The interest rate differs depending on the credit card company. Different lenders also have different rules for going over your credit card limit.

Compared to instant personal loans, credit cards have a short repayment period. So, if you need more time to repay the loan, applying for a personal loan online or through an app is a better option. Additionally, credit cards may have annual maintenance fees, unlike instant personal loans.

H2: Traditional loans

Traditional loans allow you to borrow a fixed amount for a fixed term with a predetermined repayment schedule. Often borrowed money must be used for a specific reason. It can look like a home loan, car loan or mortgage. These loans tend to be secured loans and require you to put up an asset as collateral.

On the contrary, instant personal loans are unsecured loans and the money can be used at your discretion.

H2: Personal line of credit

A personal line of credit is a revolving, flexible credit account that lets you borrow money up to a limit, without having to borrow the full amount all at once. You only pay interest on the amount borrowed. These often have maintenance fees and are more expensive than traditional secured loans.

These options often have variable interest rates. While most instant personal loans, including those granted through a personal loan app, have a fixed interest rate. This makes it easier to calculate future expenses that you will incur due to the loan.

H2: Payday Loans

Payday loans are short term unsecured loans. They can be taken for a few days and reimbursement is expected once you receive your salary for that month. However, they often have high interest rates and hidden fees. Thus, we recommend safer borrowing options such as traditional loans and instant personal loans.

If you are considering taking out a loan, especially in a financial emergency, or have a below average credit history, Instant Personal Loans Online offers you a fast application process, holistic approval standards and rapid disbursement of funds.









Astro Bob: Meet Boötes, the Ice Cream Cone Constellation – Duluth News Tribune

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What is your favorite flavor of ice cream? Mine is maple and walnut, but I wouldn’t turn down a bowl of plain vanilla either. I like mine wrapped in a waffle cone. The kind with a chocolate chip waiting for you at the pointed end. What a satisfying finish!

Since we are well into ice season (do we need a season?), it seems like the time is right to introduce Boötes the Shepherd, a constellation that grows in prominence in May and June.

Bootes and an ice cream cone share a similar shape. The constellation offers a more generous scoop of ice cream than this modest treat. Arcturus shines at the narrow tip of the cone.

Contributed / Bob King

Two things about Boötes: people, even amateur astronomers, are a bit unsure of its pronunciation, and it’s shaped like – you guessed it – an ice cream cone. Don’t be intimidated by the umlaut above the “o”, as if you had to know German to say it correctly. It’s there to remind us to voice each “o” separately instead of executing them. So it’s bo-oh-teez. Not BOO-teez. I know. It still seems a bit ridiculous.

Y asterism
You can connect the brightest stars of Boötes and the nearby constellation Corona Borealis the northern crown to form a letter “Y” shaped asterism.

Contributed / Bob King

Finding the constellation is super simple. The next clear night as soon as it gets dark, face south and look straight up. You will see a bright orange star. It is Arcturus (arc-TOUR-us), the fourth brightest star in the night sky. It is only 36.7 light years from Earth, one of the reasons it shines so brightly. Another is that it’s a behemoth – a giant orange star 25 times bigger than the sun that emits around 100 times more light.

Now close your fist and hold it up to the sky. A fist above and slightly to the left of Arcturus, you will see a fainter second magnitude star named Izar on the left side of the cone. From Izar, connect the dots to arrive at Nekkar, the “cherry” perched atop an imaginary mound of ice cream. Then star jump to the right side of the cone, past Seginus and back to Arcturus. Two “rays” of stars come out from each side of the star. Think of them as describing a cardboard cone holder.

Bow to Arcturus
In winter, you can find Arcturus by following the arc of the ladle handle. Bootes is on the side in the eastern sky at this time of year.

Contributed / Bob King

That’s all we can say about it. The entire constellation spans about two and a half fists or 25°. Boötes has long been associated with the Big Dipper, the Big Dipper, the brightest part of which we know as the Big Dipper. In late winter, when Boötes first rises in the east after dusk, you can easily find Arcturus by simply following the arc of the ladle handle toward the horizon.

The myth of the boots
Boötes is depicted with Canes Venatici the Hounds and Coma Berenices (Hair of Berenice) in a 19th century star atlas.

Contribution / The Mirror of Urania, William Jamieson

Boötes depicts an executioner or herder, but is better known as the Bear Guard because the figure appears to follow the bear as it orbits the North Star during the year. The name Arcturus suggests this – it means bear keeper from ancient Greek “arktos” (bear) and “ouros” (watcher).

All the stars are in motion as they orbit the center of the Milky Way, but you’d never know that at a glance. Even the nearest ones are so distant that a human lifetime is far too short to see them change position. Orion looks the same when you draw Social Security as the day you first looked into your mother’s eyes.

Arcturus moves!
Compare these two Boötes maps from 300 BC and today, and you’ll see how Arcturus has shifted a little to the southwest, subtly altering the shape of the constellation.

Contribution / Stellarium

That said, Arcturus is one of the fastest. Not only is it close, but it also crosses our field of vision at the rate of just over a tenth of a full moon’s diameter per century. This adds up to two full moon diameters or 1° every 1,500 years. Since ancient Greece, Arcturus has slipped more than 1° to the southwest. A sharp-eyed observer would have no problem detecting its movement over this period of time. But until we have a time machine, I’m afraid we’ll have to settle for a few select telescopic stars if we want to see movement in our lives.

Arcturus is currently near its closest point to Earth and glows with a bright, warm glow. In 150,000 years, when it is considerably farther away, it will be too faint to see with the naked eye – our distant descendants won’t even notice it. All the more reason to step out now to enjoy the Herdsman and Bear Star.

“Astro” Bob King is a freelance writer for the Duluth News Tribune.

Engineers measure snowpack to predict flooding

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As you have heard, a flood advisory is now in effect until this (Monday) morning for the Chena River near the North Pole and upstream of its headwaters. There is also a flood watch on the Salcha River.

The river level on Upper Chena rose gradually over the weekend, and the National Weather Service reports minor flooding in low-lying or flood-prone areas, including along the Chena Hot Springs Road and area. from Steamboat Landing to the North Pole. The latest river forecasts are at weather.gov/aprfc.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District regulates flow on the Chena by operating the Moose Creek Dam as part of the Chena River Lakes Flood Control Project at the North Pole.

USACE, in partnership with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service, uses snow survey data to predict potential flooding during ice breakup, collecting data from nine monitoring in the Chena River Basin. This is how they estimate the volume of water when the snowpack melts in the mountains…to anticipate when to close the dam gates and prevent flooding downstream in Fairbanks.

Lauren Olivier

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USACE – District of Alaska

The Chena River meanders through downtown Fairbanks at dusk on April 30, 2022.

After the 1967 Fairbanks flood that caused approximately $80 million in damage, the Chena Project was built in the 1970s to protect the city, the North Pole, and Fort Wainwright from future disasters.

Although the floodplain behind the dam remains dry for most of the year, USACE officials may retain water when river levels are high due to heavy snowmelt, ice jams or heavy rains. Since its construction, the 7½ mile earth dam has operated 30 times.

Rosie Duncan, a USACE employee who helped with the snow survey work, says the Fairbanks area is still feeling the effects of December’s record snowfall and freezing rain event.

Chena River Basin

An aerial image of the Chena River Basin near Pleasant Valley and Munson Ridge on March 30, 2022.

Nathan Epps, head of the hydraulics and hydrology section, says that “snow records measured approximately double the normal snow-water equivalent in the Chena watershed, which is the highest recorded since the beginning of measurements in 1980”.

During normal operations, the Moose Creek Dam regulates the flow of the Chena River to no more than 12,000 cubic feet per second through downtown Fairbanks.

The effects of flooding downstream along the river also depend on conditions in the Tanana and Little Chena rivers as well as local drainages. Low-lying areas near the Chena River may experience minor flooding, while elevated groundwater may occur for several thousand feet downstream of the dam.

Mega project

Meanwhile, construction will begin this spring to strengthen the structure. Dubbed a “mega project” and funded by the recently enacted Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, the Bauer Foundation Corp. of Florida was awarded a $75.5 million contract to establish an on-site mixed concrete barrier wall at the base of the dam that spans 6,200 linear feet at depths of up to 65 feet.

The project stems from a 2017 modification study that recommended strengthening the dam to extend its life and improve the protection of the greater Fairbanks area for many years to come. Construction is expected to be complete by January 2026. The dam will continue to operate and regulate the flow of the Chena River as needed while work is underway.

“The successful completion of this modification project will allow us to address the risks associated with aging infrastructure and deliver an upgraded infrastructure that is built to last,” DeRocchi said.

The public is encouraged to stay informed of weather and flooding conditions by monitoring news reports and social media posts. It is also recommended that people remove their belongings from low areas, such as basements and crawl spaces, to protect these items from potential flood damage.

As the USACE prepares for a busy spring that may involve the operation of the Moose Creek Dam to reduce flood risk and make safety improvements to the structure itself, local citizens can rest assured that the team has their best interest in mind.

“Public safety is always our top priority,” DeRocchi said.

See Mars on Earth (here we are on a planet!) — High Country News – Know the West

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Kim Stanley Robinson explains how the High Sierra influenced his science fiction.

Hard on the heels from his latest science fiction novel, The ministry of the future — a searing vision of climate change in the near future — just released Kim Stanley Robinson The High Sierra: A Love Story. The book is a gripping memoir intertwined with musings on history, literature, geology, ecology, politics, and psychogeography, all threaded through the narrative thread of the author’s lifelong enchantment with hiking and scrambling in a trailless desert on a precarious planet spinning in space.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Jon Christensen: How did High Sierra influence your science fiction?

Kim Stanley Robinson: I think it was formative, in a very deep sense. I was surprised at how many of my texts have High Sierra analogies. Right from the start I can see when Hjalmar Nederland wanders around Mars in Icehenge, it was a walk in the Sierra. And it kept event. That was true in my Mars trilogy. Terraforming Mars is really cheating. Mars is basalt rather than granite. It’s toxic rather than healthy. So turning Mars into High Sierras required something like a 2,000-page novel to make it even slightly plausible. I love when my novels find their way to take a long walk. It is also a gesture towards Ursula K. Le Guin. In The left hand of darknesswhen Genly Ai and Estraven have to take a long hike across the glacier, it’s brilliant writing, and it’s always inspired me.

JC: Did the process work the other way around? Did your science fiction influence your experience of the High Sierra?

KSR: When you’re hiking in the High Sierra, you’re high enough on this planet that you can look out into the Central Valley and into the Owens Valley and think, “Look, you’re on a planet here.” It’s kind of a sci-fi moment. This leads to other ideas. Like, what’s the future of wilderness? Is there wilderness in the Anthropocene? And what are we going to do with this planet in the future? And then I also think of the deep past. What about the first people who arrived here? Somewhere between 20,000 and 10,000 years ago, humans roamed these spaces, and they had hiking kits that were no different from ours. They used leather, wood and other natural materials to create lightweight objects that they could carry on their backs and be comfortable at the end of the day. When I’m up there hiking, my literary imagination, a historical imagination, is definitely fired up.

JC: What has changed in the High Sierra in your lifetime?

KSR: The bottom line is that climate change has hit the Sierra. The fires mean that there is often smoke up there and the lower parts have burned. And the glaciers go, go, are gone. I saw it with my own eyes. I climbed to the head of Deadman Canyon, where there were seven glaciers, and now there is only one. And it’s very small. It will be gone in three, four years. In the Sierras, everything happens faster than we thought. You know, I was hoping that I would die before that happened, and it would be someone else’s problem. But no, it will be something I will see on every trip for the rest of my life.

JC: And what do you think of the future of Sierra Nevada?

KSR: I have thought about this a lot. I think it’s a practice honed by writing science fiction. This is where we are, this is the trajectory we are on, so let’s extrapolate. The Sierra is part of the 30 by 30 plan for California, keeping 30% of California wild by 2030. And they’re thinking 50 by 50 to follow. The Sierras will be very important for this. The tree ring data indicates very clearly that there have been prodigious droughts in the American West, and we may be entering another. That doesn’t mean the Sierras will die out and be just dead rock. There are extremophiles out there. The life forms up there are used to desiccation, and then to being under the snow. And being so high up and so close to the Pacific, they’re going to get some precipitation. Maybe it will be really irregular; possibly the Arizona monsoon from the Gulf of California in July. But it won’t turn into one of those totally moonscapes you see in some places, including other places in the American West. It will always be a little greener, a little more varied, a little more Sierra. That’s what I see when I try to push it forward. He will be injured, damaged. It will change. But it won’t be dead. It’s a little comfort.

It’s kind of a sci-fi moment. This leads to other ideas. Like, what’s the future of wilderness? Is there wilderness in the Anthropocene? And what are we going to do with this planet in the future?

JC: You participated very recently in the designation of Mount Thoreau. And your book addresses the debate over renaming some of the Sierra peaks named after racists and eugenicists. What is your guiding philosophy for naming the landscape?

KSR: I think there is no harm in naming woodpeckers after humans as a gesture to honor them and what they stood for. But almost all of Sierra’s names came from the period between the Civil War and World War II. And they kind of screwed it up. All the philosophy of the time concerned the great men of history. On the one hand, it was intensely masculine. On the other hand, they were entrepreneurs. Stanford has two; there are two Mount Stanfords in the Sierra Nevada. So those names are crap. And if there’s the equivalent of a Confederate monument up there, which there is, let’s take it down. These magnificent peaks should have better names. Native American names should go back to where we know them.

JC: One name you think should stick around is John Muir. Why do you think Muir needs to defend now?

KSR: I feel like his defense attorney. And, of course, he wasn’t perfect. Nobody is perfect. I also try to interrogate my own feelings now and realize that I’m partly interested in questions of historiography, like, how do we judge people from the past? And what is the psychological motivation for judging historical figures for doing good or evil? Is it part of the judgment we pass on ourselves? I think it must be. Then it gets even more interesting. I’m interested in Muir. I have read all of his writings, including his unpublished works in the archives. Muir has a bad reputation. Out of, I guess, 3,000 to 4,000 published pages, there are, indeed, at least three or four pages of nasty commentary on Native Americans. Muir did not understand that he was looking at a devastated refugee population. He looked at the prisoners. That was stupid of Muir. And he had prejudices, it’s true. But in reality, he was a great admirer of Native American cultures.

JC: What do you think Muir still has to offer us – now and in the future. Why shouldn’t we bury him for good?

KSR: For Native Americans, Muir is the symbol of the colonial appropriation of Native lands by European settlers. So we have white settler colonialism and the incredible pent up guilt of the suppression and near extermination of the Native American population on this land. How, then, do you take care of this land? Like Wes Jackson’s book Become a native of this place, how do you do? It’s really a religious issue, in a way — the transcendental idea that nature is a sacred space, that God is imminent, that you can transcend by paying close attention to nature. As a powerful public intellectual of his time, Muir was a crucial figure. He was also an early reader of Thoreau. He reads Walden when he was young. He read all 20 volumes of the complete works of Thoreau. For Native Americans in California, Muir represents the appropriation of their ancestral lands, even if, compared to the armed military men who killed and hunted them, he was just a hippie figure wandering up there saying, “This place is beautiful!” But also, the story is not determinative. In terms of advice for us, for what to do now, it is extremely ambiguous. You can take what you want from it.

JC: Not a big fan of the John Muir Trail, though, or bagging peaks. You prefer to get off the beaten track, cross nameless passes and cross high basins without paths. It seems to be almost a philosophy. Why?

KSR: Well, it’s beautiful. And you can do it. The Sierra is a huge eroded plateau. So, unlike some other mountain ranges in the world, like the Swiss Alps, you can walk around without putting yourself in immediate danger and without having to climb vertically. The John Muir Trail now receives 90% of traffic in the Sierra. There is a lot of wilderness with no trails and very few names. When you hike and scramble, you get off the trail, but you’re not putting your life in danger. Problems can be solved with intense cognitive and physical effort. And you can get a little jittery thrill, like, oh my God, I better not fall here. But even if you fall, you’re not going to kill yourself at the bottom of that fall, which is exactly what I don’t like about rock climbing. So hiking and scrambling is a very nice activity. To be completely honest, I’m playing a game up there. It’s all for fun. I’m like a 5 year old in a gymnasium in the jungle. And it’s just a spectacular gym in the jungle.

Jon Christensen teaches and does research at the Institute of the Environment and Sustainability and the Luskin Center for Innovation at UCLA, where he is one of the founders of the Laboratory for Environmental Narrative Strategies.

High Court approves new Amigo Loans business scheme

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A High Court judge has accepted Amigo Loans’ proposed new business plan in a crucial step towards the company resuming lending.

Monday’s announcement marks a turnaround for the subprime lender, although it has yet to raise new capital and receive clearance from the Financial Conduct Authority.

Amigo, which offers loans based on someone else’s guarantee, stopped lending in November 2020, citing uncertainty caused by the pandemic. It has not been able to resume operations since due to a dispute over compensation for historic mis-selling.

The company has faced complaints from consumers who accused it of not checking whether their loans were affordable.

“A successful New Business Scheme will open the door to a new source of responsible and regulated finance for millions of people in this country who do not have access to traditional banking services,” Chief Executive Gary Jennison said.

A previous “scheme of arrangement” proposed by Amigo that would have limited compensation payments to a greater extent was rejected by the FCA, which said it unfairly benefited shareholders rather than customers.

The new scheme offers more compensation, in part due to better-than-expected loan repayments in 2021.

Under the new scheme, Amigo will pay compensation of at least £112 million on the condition that it can resume lending within 9 months of the scheme being approved and that it can complete a rights issue in 12 months after approval.

Over the past year, Amigo’s share price has fallen more than 66% despite rising a modest 6.6% since January.

The UK regulator has cracked down on so-called non-standard finance providers in recent years in response to concerns about rising consumer debt.

The number of active short-term high-cost lenders in the UK fell by almost a third between 2016 and the third quarter of 2020, according to FCA figures. Meanwhile, Wonga, once the UK’s biggest payday loan provider, filed for administration in 2018 after a flurry of customer complaints.

Others, like subprime lender Provident Financial, have stopped serving those with the worst credit ratings, leaving this group with a lack of options other than loan sharks and illegal money lending.

In March, Provident Financial chief executive Malcolm Le May told the Financial Times that many of those considered “high risk” for credit were turning to buy now and pay later, a form interest-free online credit available for retail purchases.

Jennison also warned that the UK was “sleepwalking into debt” following the buy it now, pay later.

Avalanche forecaster: Butte native helps guide snow clearing at Glacier National Park | Local

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She faces each workday with uncertainty.

His job is to declare an educated prediction about a winter threat notorious for its unpredictability.

Gabrielle Antonioli, 32, from Butte, works for Glacier National Park as an avalanche forecaster. She began seasonal work in April, when crews began clearing snow along Going-to-the-Sun Road. Departure to the east and to the west.






As an avalanche forecaster at Glacier National Park, Gabrielle Antonioli must climb to high altitudes to monitor snow conditions to try to protect workers below plowing the Going-to-the-Sun road.


Courtesy picture


Nobody wants a snow removal crew member, searcher or park ranger to be swept away by the snow rolling down like a powdery white locomotive. Yet in recent years there has been pressure from merchants and visitors to open the road as soon as possible.

On Tuesday, the National Park Service estimated that the Going-to-the-Sun road will open no earlier than June 27 this year.

Antonioli is about to earn his master’s degree in snow science at Montana State University. Her curriculum vitae and her experience in the field paint the portrait of an expert in avalanches.

People also read…







avalanche forecaster

Butte native Gabrielle Antonioli works as an avalanche forecaster at Glacier National Park. His role requires him to work in the field to assess avalanche risk and monitor snow movement.


Courtesy picture


She has worked for the American Avalanche Institute, Montana Alpine Guides and as a trainee forecaster at the Gallatin National Forest Avalanche Center.

“Bozeman is the epicenter of a lot of scientific work on snow,” Antonioli said.

In total, she spent about eight years in the specialized field of avalanche forecasting, gaining knowledge from mentors and the behavior of snow itself.

“I’m quite young for snow science because it takes time to gain knowledge and awareness through experience,” Antonioli said.







Clean up the station

Gabrielle Antonioli cleans a US Geological Survey weather station in Glacier National Park. The station provides useful data for her and two other forecasters monitoring avalanche danger.


Courtesy picture


She is the first avalanche forecaster to be employed by Glacier National Park.

The daughter of Peter and Sandra Antonioli of Butte, Antonioli thinks her mother probably worries more than her father about the work she does in places where the snow is both deep and potentially dangerous.

“I guess I rationalized that there are risks in all things in life and it’s just more evident in this business,” she said.

And, like life, predicting avalanches requires a tolerance for uncertainty, she said.

Antonioli said the inherent unpredictability of avalanche forecasting calls for forecasters to set conservative margins of safety.







Monitor snow activity

Gabrielle Antonioli skis uphill in the alpine above the Going-to-the-Sun route to keep an eye on snow activity.


Courtesy picture


Early Warning Trio

His working days at Glacier National Park start early. She gets up around 3:30 a.m. She is in front of her computer, coffee in hand, around 4 a.m. She checks the weather forecast, checks if new snow has arrived overnight and consults other relevant data.

The US Geological Survey’s Garden Wall weather station is an altitude station that provides temperature data, as well as wind direction and speed.

At around 5 a.m., she or a colleague writes an avalanche forecast with observations of potential dangers to snow removal crews that day. His colleagues include Jon Hageness, an avalanche forecaster for Glacier National Park, as well as Zachary Miller, an avalanche forecaster for the USGS.

The avalanche forecasting program has been a joint project of the USGS and the National Park Service for 20 years.

Around 6 a.m., the forecasters share the day’s avalanche prognosis with the snow removal teams.







Plowing the roads on the way to the sun 2018 04.jpg

One of Glacier’s rotary plows at the Big Drift in 2018.


TOM BAUER/Missoulian


Then Antonioli and Hageness go up the Going-to-the-Sun route until they reach the crews. Both alpine touring skis have a binding that allows heel movement. They add ski skins to gain traction when climbing. They sometimes add crampons.

Antonioli and Hageness reach vantage points above the plowing and watch the avalanche paths, staying vigilant on behalf of the crews working below. According to the National Park Service, there are more than 40 avalanche paths between the avalanche campground and the rising sun.

“We communicate by radio with the crews if the snow starts moving,” Antonioli said. “Crews can’t see or hear anything in these big rigs, so we communicate with them a lot.”

Snow science has its own language, with words and phrases like corn snow, slab, surface hoar, trigger point, snow pit, frost and many more.







Going-to-the-Sun Road Labor 2018 13.jpg (copy)

An excavator digs the Big Drift just east of Logan Pass on Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park in June 2018.


File photo


“We occasionally dig snow pits to check the structure of the snowpack and see where meltwater has seeped into the snow and how deep,” Antonioli said. “It helps us know if larger wet snow avalanches could be possible with an additional supply of sun or rain. With so many recent snowfalls, we dug them deeper into the top meter of snow to see in how well the new snow adheres to the old snow surface.

The National Geographic Society reports: “During an avalanche, a mass of snow, rock, ice, dirt, and other material slides rapidly down the side of a mountain. Snowslides, the most common type of avalanche, can hurtle downhill faster than the fastest skier.

“A large, fully developed avalanche can weigh up to a million tons” and can travel at over 200 mph, reports the Society.

Plowing in front

Road clearing began the first week of April and will continue until the Going-to-the-Sun road is cleared east and west to Logan Pass. The road generally opens between mid-June and mid-July.

Traders who rely on seasonal income from visiting the park tend to be anxious when the road remains closed well past mid-June.

Sometimes snow conditions stop work.

“On days of high avalanche danger, other road workers and park employees generally do not get on the road, and only emergency travel is recommended,” Antonioli said. “We’ll usually go up to a safe place and do a tour to see what’s going on up high on those days. On other days the danger will increase as the day warms up or more sun comes up and weakens the snow surface, and we will work for the morning and get everyone out in time for the increased warming , with a large (safety) margin.”







Upcoming Scouting

One of the jobs of avalanche forecasters at Glacier National Park is to spot snow removal crews along the Going-to-the-Sun road to let them know how much debris is in the avalanche paths on along the road. In this photo, Gabrielle Antonioli, wearing crampons, crosses an avalanche path at Triple Arches.


Courtesy picture


On May 26, 1953, an avalanche crossed the Going-to-the-Sun road nearly a mile above the Garden Wall road camp. It killed two road crew members, seriously injured a third, and buried the foreman in about seven feet of snow for about 7.5 hours.

It was preceded by fresh, wet snowfall of 10 to 43 cm and a letter from the park engineer to the park superintendent stating “extremely hazardous snowslide conditions”.

The body of worker William Whitford, 45, was about 800 feet below the highway, according to a National Park Service investigation that followed the avalanche. The coroner’s report concluded that Whitford’s death was caused by a crushed chest and a broken neck.

The body of 45-year-old George Beaton was about 1,200 feet below the road. He too had suffered serious injuries.

“This accident occurred while the park road maintenance crew was carrying out their normal snow removal activities for this season of the calendar year,” the inquest reported. He noted: “It should also be remembered that there is always an element of danger involved in snow clearing operations on any mountain road.”

A recommendation from the road engineer who conducted the survey: “Delay the start date of the opening of the Going-to-the-Sun road by approximately three weeks”.

Close calls

The Park Service launched new regulations this year following a few close calls in recent years with avalanches and allowed hikers and cyclists beyond vehicle barricades

In May 2021, two Bigfork cyclists were trapped between two avalanches and required an overnight rescue by park rangers.

This year, the Park Service is using hiker/mountain biker closure signage to limit where people on foot or on bikes can go on the road. Closure locations will be based on assessments of potential avalanche hazard along the Going-to-the-Sun Highway, park officials said.

Avalanches play a role in supporting natural processes and biodiversity in mountain ecosystems.

Think of avalanche falls. Think blueberries.

“Avalanches are essential for the biodiversity of mountain ecosystems”, according to a study.

Climate change is now in the mix, leading some researchers to question how avalanches will behave in the future.

Meanwhile, Antonioli hopes to return to Glacier National Park in the spring of 2023 as a seasonal avalanche forecaster.

“Honestly, it’s probably one of the most unique avalanche jobs in the industry,” she said.

The Best Hiking Trails in Atlantic Canada

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There’s no better way to experience the rugged landscape of Atlantic Canada only on foot. From New Brunswick to Newfoundland, this region is a paradise for outdoor enthusiasts. Offering some of the world’s finest walks – old and new – you can expect to encounter land and sea wildlife, iconic landmarks and vibrant communities along the way. We’ve selected some of the provinces best long distance hikes to slow down and enjoy the rugged coastlines and dense forests in this incredible part of Canada.

The Island Walk, Prince Edward Island

It may be Canada’s smallest province, but Prince Edward Island (also known as PEI) now boasts one of the most epic hikes. The 700km trail opened in September 2021 and circles the entire island, crossing a mix of coastal paths, red dirt roads, beaches and quiet streets. Highlights include Prince Edward Island’s iconic lighthouses, a tour of its two cities – Charlottetown and Summerside – and experiencing the island’s culture in its small local communities, fantastic arts scene to culinary delights. After all, it’s nicknamed “Canada’s Food Island,” being a top destination for oysters and lobster. Due to the easy terrain and low difficulty of the trail, the Island Walk should be a prime candidate for beginners who have always wanted the challenge of a long-distance hike. As the journey takes approximately 32 days, many hotels have teamed up to facilitate the transport of luggage between accommodations. It is also possible to tackle smaller sections of the track if you are visiting for a shorter period.

More information: The island promenade

Lonestar plans to put data centers in the Moon’s lava tubes • The Register

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Imagine a future where racks of computer servers hum silently in the darkness below the surface of the Moon.

This is where some of the most important data is stored, to keep it intact for as long as possible. The idea sounds like something out of science fiction, but a startup that recently emerged from stealth is trying to turn it into reality. Lonestar Data Holdings has a unique mission unlike any other cloud provider: to build data centers on the Moon to back up the world’s data.

“It is inconceivable to me that we keep our most valuable assets, our knowledge and our data, on Earth, where we drop bombs and burn things,” said Christopher Stott, Founder and CEO of Lonestar. The register. “We need to put our assets in place off our planet, where we can keep it safe.”

Stott said Lonestar’s efforts to build a data storage facility in space are a bit like trying to preserve all the seeds in the world in the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, located on Norway’s Arctic island of Spitsbergen. But instead of trying to protect the diversity of cultures, the upstart wants to safeguard human knowledge.

“If we don’t, what will happen to our data on Earth?” he asked. “The seed bank has been flooded due to the effects of climate change. It is also susceptible to other forms of destruction like war or cyberattacks. We need a place where we can keep our data safe. ” Lonestar has its sights set on the Moon.

One side of our natural satellite is tidally locked and constantly facing the Earth, which means that it would be possible to establish direct and constant communication between devices on the Moon and our planet.

Lonestar is currently closing its $5 million funding round from investors including Seldor Capital and 2 Future Holding. To raise more money, it will need to prove that its technology is feasible and will start with small demonstrations on commercial lunar payloads. Last month, it announced it had signed contracts to launch prototype demonstrations of its software and hardware capabilities aboard two lunar landers with Intuitive Machines, a NASA-funded aerospace company.

As part of the space agency’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services program, Intuitive Machines will, after some delay, send its Nova-C lander to the Moon for its first mission, dubbed IM-1, in late 2022. Lonestar will run software-only test, storing a small bit of data about the lander’s hardware. IM-1 is expected to last one lunar day, the equivalent of two weeks on Earth.

The second launch, IM-2, is more ambitious. Intuitive Machines plans to send another Nova-C lander to the Moon’s south pole carrying various pieces of equipment, including NASA’s PRIME-1 ice drill and spectrometer as well as Lonestar’s first hardware prototype: a one-kilogram storage device, the size of a hardcover novel, with 16 terabytes of memory. The IM-2 is expected to launch in 2023.

Robots and lava tubes

The small proof-of-concept data center will store immutable data for Lonestar’s first beta of its so-called Disaster Recovery as a Service (DRaaS), Stott told us. “[We will be] perform load and download tests (think refreshing and restoring data) and also perform application edge processing tests. It will run on Ubuntu. The company is still determining bandwidth rates and has obtained permissions to transmit data to the Moon and to Earth in the S, X and Ka bands of the radio spectrum.

Whether Lonestar will test its technology on the Moon for the first time will depend on whether Intuitive Machines’ Nova-C landers succeed in reaching the lunar surface in one piece. Soft landings on the Moon are notoriously difficult; many attempts by the Soviets and the United States in the 1960s ended in failure. The last two failed attempts were in 2019, when Israel’s SpaceIL and India’s national space agency crashed their Beresheet and Chandrayaan-2 lunar landers respectively.

The Moon’s strong gravitational pull and very thin atmosphere mean that the speeds at which spacecraft approach the surface must be significantly slowed in a short time to land smoothly. Nailing down the landing process is key to lunar exploration, whether it’s sending out a robotic spacecraft or a crew of astronauts.

“Our turnkey solution for delivering, communicating and ordering customer payloads on and around the Moon is revolutionary,” Intuitive President and CEO Steve Altemus told us in a statement. “Adding Lonestar Data Holdings and other commercial payloads to our lunar missions is a critical step towards creating and defining the lunar economy by intuitive machines.”

The path from a book-sized prototype to full fledged cloud storage data centers, however, is a wavy one. Stott said Lonestar has plans for future missions to launch servers capable of holding five petabytes of data in 2024 and 50 petabytes of data by 2026. By then, he hopes the data center will be able to host data traffic to and from the Moon at rates of 15 Gigabits per second – much faster than home broadband Internet speeds – broadcast from a series of antennas.

If the company wants to continue to scale and store data long-term, it will need to find a way to protect its data centers from cosmic radiation and cope with fluctuations in the Moon’s surface temperatures, which can range from from 222.8°F (106°C) during the day to -297.4°F (-183°C) at night.

Stott has an answer to this: nest data centers in lunar lava tubes, cavernous pits carved beneath the Moon’s surface by the flow of ancient basalt lava. Inside these pits, the temperature will be more stable and the servers will be better protected from harmful electromagnetic rays.

And how is the Lonestar going to get them there? “Robots…lots of robots,” Stott said. ®

The sky this week May 20-27

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Saturday May 21
Mercury reaches inferior conjunction at 3:00 p.m. EDT. The smallest planet in the solar system will reappear in the morning sky by next month.

Instead, let’s focus on a few other planets to the east early this morning. Two hours before sunrise, Jupiter, Mars, and Neptune all share the Pisces region directly below (to the southeast) the Circlet asterism. The Circlet consists of seven stars: Gamma (γ), 7, Theta (θ), Iota (ι), 19, Lambda (λ) and Kappa (κ) Piscium. This approximate circle of stars lies about 12° south of a line drawn between Algenib and Markab, which marks one side of the Grand Square of Pegasus. Gamma Psc is the brightest of the bunch – thought luminosity is relative, as it shines at magnitude 3.7.

While your eyes are on the Circlet, take a look at 19 Psc, also cataloged as TX Psc. It is a variable star whose unmistakable dark red color comes from the abundant carbon in its atmosphere. TX Psc fluctuates between magnitude 4.9 and 5.5 over approximately 220 days.

Now look down at the horizon from TX, and you’ll fall directly on Jupiter, shining at magnitude -2.2. About 5° to the upper right (west) is Mars, a reddish magnitude of 0.7. Neptune, whose magnitude 7.8 glow will require binoculars to spot, lies an additional 2° west of Mars.

Magnitude 0.7 Saturn lies far to the west, lingering in Capricorn near the 1st magnitude star Deneb Algedi. And in an hour, Venus will climb above the horizon, the brightest of our morning planets at magnitude -4.2.

Sunrise: 5:40 am
Sunset: 8:14 p.m.
Moonrise: 01:25
Moon setting: 11:09
Moon phase: Waning gibbous (62%)

Sunday May 22
The Moon passes 4° south of Saturn at 1:00 a.m. EDT. One hour before sunrise, while the sky is still dark, our satellite is just over 5° directly below (southeast) the ringed planet in the southeastern sky. Although much of the moonlight washes away nearby Saturn, it’s still worth trying to glimpse the planet’s magnificent ring system through a telescope.

Then turn your gaze to the Moon. The large circular Mare Imbrium stands out in the lunar northwest, its southeastern edge marked by the rugged Apennine Mountains, named for the terrestrial mountain range in Italy. Just to the south is the bright Copernicus Crater, which stretches for about 93 kilometers. This lunar pockmark is extremely young, probably less than a billion years old, with several bright rays of ejecta – material thrown and pushed away by the impact – around it.

The last quarter moon occurs shortly after noon at 2:43 p.m. EDT.

Sunrise: 5:39
Sunset: 8:15 p.m.
Moonrise: 02:01
Moon setting: 12:21 p.m.
Moon phase: Waning gibbous (51%)

Choosing the Right Career: Balancing Financial Needs with the Work You Love

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Is the right career the one that pays the bills or the one that excites you? Is it possible to have the best of both worlds?

“Do what you love and you won’t work one day!” A common saying, but one that needs to be removed. As we’ve seen with the gig economy, turning your passion into a job is…well…a job. All jobs have levels of stress, even if you love what you do. So when it comes to supporting yourself, should you choose the career you love or the one that pays the bills? Is it possible to do both?

go inside

First and foremost, decide what you like to do. Since an average career can last up to 10 years or more, you want to make sure you’re getting into something you love doing or are passionate about. Thinking long term is key here.

The next thing is to decide which lifestyle do you prefer? Keep in mind the 10 year rule here. Are you a day person or a night person? Do you want to own a house or would you agree to rent an apartment? Would you like to own a luxury car or two, or are you happy with a decent electric vehicle?

You need to consider the type of lifestyle you prefer, as this will help determine how much money you need to earn. This exercise will show you how much you would eventually need to earn. Once you’ve decided what will be an acceptable and enjoyable lifestyle for you, you can dig deeper into your career choice.

Meet the right people

Once you know what you want to do and how much you’d like to earn, find the people who are already doing it. Take them out for a cup of coffee or watch them. Start meeting people in the industry you want to work in and start interviewing them. Ask them questions about how they like their job, if there is a work-life balance, and what they enjoy most about their profession.

The idea here is to get people in your “future” career to turn the tide. They can even help you with the right kind of courses and such. For example, acquiring fintech skills are a must if you love the online banking industry. Once you have all this information, making a choice shouldn’t be difficult. When you have gone through these steps, the response that should arise will be more precise and natural.

Conclusion

Choosing the right career means finding a balance between what you love and how you want to live. Also, keep an open mind as much as you can. It is also acceptable to branch out and explore other aspects of this industry or anything that may be completely different. As you progress through your career and accomplish various things, focus on maintaining a Competency-Based Resume and update it regularly. Thus, you will be ready to seize the opportunities that will arise along the way. Life always has its ups and downs, and if during this time you need more support then check out My salary in Canada for online payday loans. It is one of the most respected payday loan companies in Canada.

Fact Check: The Azimuthal Equidistant Map of the World, used by the USGS and the United Nations, is a clue that the Earth is flat.

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The azimuthal equidistant projection is useful, but like all 2D maps, it creates distortions because the Earth is an oblate spheroid.

Conspiracy theorist Mark Sargent has created a multi-part video series attempting to prove the discredited flat Earth theory. He separates his theories into “clues” which are supposed to prove that planet Earth is flat and that a secret group Sargent calls “the Authority” is keeping this from the public eye. In part three of his series, Sargent focuses on a specific map projection used by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) called the Azimuthal Equidistant, similar to maps favored by Flat Earthers. In both versions of the map, there appears to be a wall of ice surrounding the continents. He cites a note on Wikipedia that the USGS uses it for an atlas of the United States. Sargent also points out that NASA named a crater on the moon after the 11th-century Persian scholar Al-Biruni, who created an azimuthal equidistant projection map of the planet. Sargent claims this is proof that Al-Biruni created a truly correct map of the flat Earth. Additionally, Sargent cites the United Nations (UN) logo, which features the same projection. These are considered clues that the USGS, NASA and the UN are aware that the Earth is flat.

The Earth is an oblate spheroid that cannot be rendered accurately in any two-dimensional presentation. The azimuthal equidistant map does not represent the wall of ice that some flat-earth proponents believe encircles the flat world. This simply reflects the distortion of Antarctica that would occur when a map is based on a central point from which the rest of the map is projected outward, which in this case is the North Pole. If the map was instead projected from the South Pole, it would grossly distort the size of the other continents.

The flat Earth theory has been debunked countless times. As with his other videos, Sargent relies on speculation, pointing to supposed clues left by “The Authority.” The USGS uses the Azimuthal Equidistant Projection, as claimed by Sargent, along with many other types of maps, for various purposes.

The idea that any map is “correct” is a misunderstanding of what maps are. As previously noted by Logic, all two-dimensional maps are, in their own way, “misinformation” due to the limitations of any attempt to accurately represent the Earth – an oblate spheroid – in a flat form. Different map projections have different accuracies and are used in different ways. According to the USGS, the azimuth equidistant map helps show “airline distances from [the] center point of the projection. It is useful for radio, aviation and seismic mapping, and illustrates the polar hemispheres. The Mercator projection is used when mapping equatorial areas, and the equal-area sinusoidal projection better represents large landmasses that run north to south, such as Africa. In total, there are 18 map projections cited by the USGS in its Map Projections Report.

The azimuthal equidistant projection is the map projection used for the United Nations logo. Although Sargent claims this choice is a hint that the Earth is flat, the UN’s decision was more likely an aesthetic decision based on practicality, as it includes the world’s inhabited continents in a single image. The UN’s use of this map projection does not prove that they know the Earth is flat.

Map projections are all inaccurate to some degree. Legitimate uses of the Azimuthal Equidistant Projection do not prove that the Earth is flat.

Oil drilling in the Arctic and its environmental ramifications

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The Arctic, as the northernmost region of the world, is certainly distinctive. It is almost completely covered in water, most of it frozen. Some frozen features, such as glaciers and icebergs, are frozen fresh water. In fact, Arctic glaciers and icebergs make up about 20% of the Earth’s fresh water supply. Temperatures in the Arctic can drop below -50 degrees Celsius in winter. It is home to unique vegetation and creatures, such as stoats, wolverines and narwhals.

As a unique natural habitat, it is at the center of environmental attention, not least because the effects of global warming are most visible here, with the melting of the polar ice caps. However, no international treaty preserves its ecology from economic development.

The case of oil drilling in Norway

Picture file

Who really controls the Arctic? Who has the power to drill oil in this area? This is a topic that rages around the world. Although there are eight Arctic states, the North Pole and its surrounding waters do not belong to any of them. Norway, Russia, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, the United States, Canada, and Denmark all have territory and territorial waters within the Arctic Circle. Norway, Western Europe’s biggest oil producer, has granted a number of exploration licenses in the Barents Sea, just inside the Arctic Circle, since 2016.

Six young Norwegians and two environmental groups, Greenpeace Nordic and Young Friends of the Earth, filed a complaint with the European Court of Human Rights in 2021, challenging the Norwegian government’s policies. The drilling, according to Lasse Eriksen Bjoern, an activist for the indigenous Sami people of northern Norway, could harm Arctic fisheries and jeopardize their way of life. It is the cry of activists that the court verdict sets a precedent for the future.

The impact of oil drilling on marine life

most marine life would be extinct due to climate change by 2300
The New York Times

The survival of people and animals that live in the Arctic depends on its unique habitat. Since companies are investing money in new technologies, it has suddenly become conceivable to dig for oil under the seabed. Concerns about rapidly declining fish stocks in the region grew in the mid-1990s.

Whales, dolphins, seals and sea otters are among the sea creatures killed by oil spills. Oil can clog the blowholes of whales and dolphins, preventing them from breathing properly and interfering with their ability to communicate. The oil on the fur of otters and seals makes them susceptible to hypothermia.

One of the most profound environmental impacts of oil spills is the long-term damage to species, their habitats and nesting or breeding grounds. Sea turtles, for example, can be affected by oil in the water or on the beach where they lay their eggs, and newly hatched turtles can be oiled when they rush to the ocean on an oily beach.

Who drills in the Arctic?

arctic climate change
Getty Images

Major oil companies such as Shell and Exxon are aggressively pursuing a new “oil rush” in the Arctic Ocean. It has already started in some places. Gazprom, the Russian energy giant, has already started producing tiny volumes of oil from the Arctic Ocean north of Russia.

The argument over oil exploration in the Arctic is driven by more than the environment. The subject of cost is particularly important, especially because the construction of an oil well in cold weather is quite difficult. It is necessary to build ice highways and an ice airstrip. Overall, drilling and development is not a profitable business.

References

Oil drilling in the Arctic. (nd). green peace. Accessed May 20, 2022.

What are the challenges of oil drilling in the Arctic? (nd). Oil Industry News. Accessed May 20, 2022.

Who Owns the Arctic and Should They Drill for Oil and Gas? (2022, April 28). BBC. Accessed May 20, 2022.

For more explainers, news and current affairs from around the world, please visit Indiatimes News.

USACE Monitors Flood Risk From Ice Breakup Conditions In Chena River Basin After Record Snowfall | Article

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The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District is partnering with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service to measure winter snowfall levels and collect additional data from nine monitoring stations around the Chena River Basin. The agencies analyze this information to estimate the volume of runoff during the melting of the snowpack in the mountains. Shown here is an aerial image of the basin near Pleasant Valley and Munson Ridge on March 30. (Photo by Rosie Duncan, USACE-Alaska District)
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Chena River Basin Monitoring








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The inter-agency team traveled by helicopter on March 30 and again on April 30 to assess the latest snow conditions at remote monitoring sites in the Chena River Basin. Spread over approximately 1,500 square miles, the water contained in melting snow, known as the snow water equivalent, will eventually flow into the Chena River and flow through downtown Fairbanks. Pictured, one of the scientists returns to his helicopter flight after carrying out a snow survey on March 30. (Photo offered)
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Chena River in Fairbanks at sunset








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During normal operations, the Moose Creek Dam regulates the flow of the Chena River to no more than 12,000 cubic feet per second through downtown Fairbanks. The effects of flooding downstream along the river also depend on conditions in the Tanana and Little Chena rivers as well as local drainages. Low-lying areas near the Chena River may experience minor flooding, while elevated groundwater may occur for several thousand feet downstream of the dam. Shown here, the Chena River meanders through downtown Fairbanks at dusk on April 30. (Photo by Lauren Oliver, USACE – District of Alaska)
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Taking measurements at the telemetry station








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The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District is partnering with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service to measure winter snowfall levels and collect additional data from nine monitoring stations around the Chena River Basin. The agencies analyze this information to estimate the volume of runoff during the melting of the snowpack in the mountains. Pictured is Lauren Oliver, a civil engineer in the district’s hydraulics and hydrology section, beginning to take measurements at one of the Chena River basin telemetry sites on April 30. (Photo offered)
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JOINT BASE ELMENDORF-RICHARDSON – As the days get longer and temperatures warmer in the state’s interior region near Fairbanks, the US Army Corps of Engineers – Alaska District uses snow data to predict snow conditions. potential flooding on the Chena River during spring break-up season.

The organization is partnering with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service to measure winter snowfall levels and collect additional data from nine monitoring stations in the Chena River Basin. The agencies analyze this information to estimate the volume of runoff during the melting of the snowpack in the mountains. In turn, the USACE can anticipate potential flood events and the need to regulate flow by operating the Moose Creek Dam at the Chena River Lakes Flood Control Project at the North Pole.

The interagency team traveled by helicopter on March 30 and again on April 30 to assess the latest snow conditions at remote sites. Spread over approximately 1,500 square miles, the water contained in melting snow, known as the snow water equivalent, will eventually flow into the Chena River and flow through downtown Fairbanks.

Based on this data, officials predict strong spring runoff that will require USACE personnel to be ready to act if the river rises to significant levels.

“Snow records measured about double the normal SWE in the basin, which is the highest recorded since measurements began in 1980,” said Nathan Epps, hydraulics and hydrology section chief.

Last winter, the greater Fairbanks area experienced record snowfall and a freezing rain event which contributed to the unusually high amount of water seen in the snowpack at some of the telemetry stations.

“The freezing rain event in late December left a layer of ice in the snowpack, which was not found in the higher elevations of the upper Chena Basin,” said Rosie Duncan, an employee of the USACE which participated in the snow survey work. “If freezing rain has fallen into the basin, the [monitoring stations] would still record this and report it as part of the snow water equivalent.

In other words, a lot of snow has accumulated and its density is higher than what is typical for the interior, Duncan said. According to the National Weather Service’s “Spring Breakup Outlook”, the flood potential of the Chena and Tanana rivers is above average. However, the speed at which this snow melts will influence whether or not dams are necessary.

“Ideally, there will be a gradual increase in temperatures to just above freezing without additional precipitation or ice jams, resulting in a longer period in which snowmelt will add to the catchment,” a- she declared.

During normal operations, the Moose Creek Dam regulates the flow of the Chena River to no more than 12,000 cubic feet per second through downtown Fairbanks. The effects of flooding downstream along the river also depend on conditions in the Tanana and Little Chena rivers as well as local drainages. Low-lying areas near the Chena River may experience minor flooding, while elevated groundwater may occur for several thousand feet downstream of the dam.

Although the floodplain behind the dam remains dry for most of the year, USACE officials may retain water when river levels are high due to heavy snowmelt, ice jams or heavy rains. After the 1967 Fairbanks flood that caused approximately $80 million in damage, the Chena Project was built in the 1970s to protect the city, the North Pole, and Fort Wainwright from future disasters. Since then, the 7½ mile earth dam has operated 30 times to keep local communities safe and prevent approximately $418 million in flood damage.

“The Moose Creek Dam is a valuable asset to the Fairbanks North Star Borough,” said Mark DeRocchi, Manager of Engineering, Construction and Operations. “In 20 years, this has prevented potentially catastrophic flooding in the region.”

Meanwhile, construction will begin this spring to strengthen the structure. Dubbed a “mega project” and funded by the recently enacted Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, the Bauer Foundation Corp. of Florida was awarded a $75.5 million contract to establish an in-situ mixed concrete barrier wall at the base of the dam that spans 6,200 linear feet at depths of up to 65 feet.

The project stems from a 2017 modification study that recommended strengthening the dam to extend its life and improve the protection of the greater Fairbanks area for many years to come. Construction is expected to be complete by January 2026. The dam will continue to operate and regulate the flow of the Chena River as needed while work is underway.

“The successful completion of this modification project will allow us to address the risks associated with aging infrastructure and deliver an upgraded infrastructure that is built to last,” DeRocchi said.

The public is encouraged to stay informed of weather and flooding conditions by monitoring news reports and social media posts. It is also recommended that people remove their belongings from low areas, such as basements and crawl spaces, to protect these items from potential flood damage.

As the USACE prepares for a busy spring that may involve the operation of the Moose Creek Dam to reduce flood risk and make safety improvements to the structure itself, local citizens can rest assured that the team has their best interest in mind.

“Public safety is always our top priority,” DeRocchi said.

Athletics: Three Cadets Named to CoSIDA All-District At-Large Academic Team

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Athletics: Three Cadets Named to All-District At-Large Academic Team CoSIDA – Norwich


















































Future astronauts could swallow water from ancient lunar volcanoes

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NASA’s Artemis program isn’t just about bringing astronaut boots back to the moon for a brief jaunt. The space agency has plans for a longer-term presence, which focuses on where we might find water resources on the moon. A new study suggests that astronauts should be looking at water left behind by ancient volcanoes.

The moon appears to be a quiet place today, but volcanic eruptions rocked it billions of years ago. A study by researchers at the University of Colorado at Boulder suggests there may be slabs of ice up to hundreds of feet thick left on the moon’s poles as a legacy of its past. volcanic.

“We think of it as frost on the moon that has built up over time,” Andrew Wilcoski, lead author of the paper published in The Planetary Science Journal in May, said in a CU Boulder statement Wednesday.

The team used computer simulations to study the effects of volcanoes. The models suggest the volcanoes spewed water vapor that returned to the surface where it turned to ice, a process the researchers likened to the formation of frost on Earth after a cold night. “According to the group’s estimates, about 41% of water from volcanoes may have condensed on the moon as ice,” the university said.

The study adds to scientists’ evolving understanding of water on our lunar neighbor. In 2020, NASA announced definitive evidence of water on the moon. We know it’s there, but there are still questions about where, how much, where it came from and how to reach it. An article published earlier in 2022 discussed how the earth could bring water to the moon.

If the computer simulations hold true, that means there could be thick ice caps nestled in craters, hidden beneath the lunar floor. This water could be used for drinking or to make rocket fuel. Robotic or human explorers could confirm this. Says Wilcoski, “We really need to dig and look for it.”

from NASA Volatiles investigates the polar exploration roveror Viper, slated for launch in 2023, will search for ice deposits on the lunar south pole, giving researchers a new layer of data to work with to uncover the history of water on the moon.

8 climate change records the world broke in 2021

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  • A new report from the World Meteorological Organization details how climate change broke new records in 2021.
  • There have been record heat waves, droughts and hurricanes.
  • Global sea levels hit a new record high and rain was recorded for the first time at the highest point in Greenland.
  • Ending the use of fossil fuels and eliminating carbon dioxide are among the actions needed to urgently tackle climate change, according to the United Nations.

Climate change is breaking worrying records around the world, confirms a new report.

State of the Global Climate 2021, from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), details a series of extreme weather events over the past year and warns that there is now a “critical” need for early warning systems to help sectors to adapt to climate change.

Global warming has been breaking records for some time, of course. In 2020, NASA and the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reported that 2010 to 2019 was the warmest decade since records began in the late 1800s.

Carbon emissions from fossil fuels reached a new record in 2019. And in 2021, a new temperature record – of 18.3°C – was set in Antarctica, the UN has announced.

Here are eight climate change records the world broke in 2021, according to the WMO.

The hottest years on record

The past seven years, between 2015 and 2021, have been the hottest years on record, the WMO has warned. Last year alone was between the fifth and seventh warmest year on record globally. The global average temperature in 2021 was around 1.11°C above average global temperatures between 1850 and 1900 – known as the “pre-industrial average”.

sea ​​level record

Sea level also reached a new record high in 2021. Globally, sea level rose by an average of 4.5 mm per year between 2013 and 2021. In several regions, sea level is growing “significantly faster” than the global average, according to the WMO. These include the South West Pacific, the South West Indian Ocean and the South Atlantic.

The hole in the Antarctic ozone layer is growing “abnormally”

The ozone hole over Antarctica in 2021 was “larger and deeper” than 70% of ozone holes measured since 1979, according to the WMO. It expanded to its widest area of ​​the year – 24.8 million km² – in October. The WMO says it was dragged by colder than average conditions in 2021 into the stratosphere – the second layer of Earth’s atmosphere from ground level. A powerful polar vortex – the band of cold air around Earth’s North Pole – was another key contributing factor.

First rain at the highest point in Greenland

Rainfall was recorded for the first time at the highest point of the Greenland Ice Sheet. This is Summit Station, a research station located more than 3,200 meters above sea level.

Several hours of rain were observed at Summit Station on August 14, 2021. Air temperatures also remained above freezing for about nine hours. It was part of an “exceptional” melting event in mid-August for Greenland, linked to a mass of warm, moist air, according to the WMO.

record heat waves

In western North America and the Mediterranean, “exceptional heat waves” were breaking records, notes the state of the world’s climate 2021. Death Valley in California recorded the highest temperature in the world since at least the 1930s, when the temperature reached 54.4C on July 9, 2021. Italy set a new provisional European record on August 11 when a research station near Syracuse in Sicily recorded a temperature of 48.8°C. Kairouan in Tunisia hit a record high of 50.3C. Spain and Turkey also broke new national records, with a temperature of 47.4°C recorded in Montoro in southern Spain and 49.1°C in Cizre near the border between Turkey and Turkey. Syria.

Hurricane Ida reaches record wind speeds

When Hurricane Ida hit Louisiana in the United States on August 29 last year, its winds of 240 km/h were the strongest landfall on record for the state, according to the WMO. Ida was the strongest hurricane of the North Atlantic season, causing extensive wind damage and storm surge flooding. The hurricane caused approximately $75 billion in economic losses in the United States and is responsible for 115 deaths in the United States and Venezuela. There were 21 named storms in 2021, well above the average of 14 per year between 1981 and 2010, the WMO notes.

Record flooding in Western Europe

In mid-July 2021 Western Europe experienced some of the worst flooding on record. West Germany and eastern Belgium were the hardest hit. Hagen in western Germany reported 241mm of rainfall in 22 hours. Rivers overflowed, several cities were flooded and there were also landslides. Germany reported 183 deaths and Belgium 36. The floods are estimated to have cost Germany $20 billion in economic losses. France, the Netherlands, Luxembourg and Switzerland also experienced heavy flooding.

Lowest water level for US reservoir

The drought has resulted in a new low water level for Lake Mead, a reservoir on the Colorado River in the southwestern United States. In July, the reservoir fell 47m below full capacity, its lowest level on record. The drought has also affected other parts of the world, including Iran, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Turkey and Turkmenistan. In Canada, a severe drought meant forecast harvest levels for wheat and canola – a crop used to create cooking oil and animal feed – were 35% to 40% below 2020 levels.

Climate change is an urgent threat requiring decisive action. Communities around the world are already experiencing heightened climate impacts, from droughts to floods to rising seas. The World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Report continues to rank these environmental threats high on the list.

To limit the global temperature increase to well below 2°C and as close as possible to 1.5°C above pre-industrial levels, it is essential that businesses, policymakers and civil society advance short-term and long-term global climate actions in accordance with the objectives of the Paris Agreement on climate change.


The World Economic Forum Climate Initiative supports scaling and accelerating global climate action through public and private sector collaboration. The Initiative is working on several work streams to develop and implement inclusive and ambitious solutions.

This includes the Alliance of CEO Climate Leaders, a global network of business leaders from various industries developing cost-effective solutions for the transition to a low-carbon, climate-resilient economy. CEOs use their position and influence with policymakers and corporate partners to accelerate the transition and realize the economic benefits of a more secure climate.

Contact us to get involved.


What action is needed?

In its latest report on the actions needed to mitigate climate change, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calls for the rapid phase-out of fossil fuels, a large-scale transition to renewable energy and to investments in the elimination of carbon dioxide.

These and other actions are outlined in the IPCC’s Climate Change Mitigation Report, which found that between 2010 and 2019, global greenhouse gas emissions were at their highest ever levels. history of mankind.

The UN says affordable and scalable solutions are now available to help countries “move to cleaner and more resilient economies”.


Political Planet – Journal – DAWN.COM

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IN 2019, the journal Science Advances published a study on the state of glaciers around the world. This study found that glaciers in the Himalayan mountain range are melting much faster than at the end of the last century. Current losses at Siachen and other glaciers reveal they have lost a vertical foot and a half of ice since 2000 – a statistic that warns of a future of drought as those in South Asia face shrinking water supply to major waterways.

The melting of glaciers and the rise of seas, everyone knows (or should know) propels us towards an environmental catastrophe which in turn produces a human catastrophe.

The heat wave currently hitting South Asia is an iteration of the environmental cataclysm. For days, Jacobabad in Sindh remained among the hottest places on earth. Dozens of people have died across the subcontinent from the ravages of heat exhaustion and dehydration. They are the victims of climate change killed simply because humans had misconceptions about global warming or failed to pay attention when such a scenario was predicted.

Since their existence on Earth, humans have consumed the planet’s resources and, in recent decades, have released too much carbon dioxide into the planet’s atmosphere. Even now, growing economies like India and China are uninterested in committing to reducing carbon emissions for fear it will stunt the growth of their economies.

The fact that climate catastrophe does not respect national borders is proving to be a problem.

At the same time, it is precisely this phenomenon of environmental degradation that reveals how far old ways of understanding the nation-state as the primary political unit are failing. The Treaty of Westphalia signed in 1648 gave birth to the nation-state as the main political unit in the world. “Kingdoms” and “empires” gave way to countries organized around borders. Living inside or even traveling through them required documents, a very new concept. Ancient travelers like Ibn-i-Battuta never had to worry about passports and visas like all travelers now have to. But at the time of the treaty, it was about new ideas, including the fact that governance by the people would replace the system of monarchies held together for hundreds of years. It is very likely that just as we cannot envision a world without the nation-state, our ancestors also scoffed at the idea that there would be countries that were not ruled by kings and their courts. .

New systems appear when the old ones are not enough or because their shortcomings make them redundant. In our current situation, the fact that climate catastrophe does not respect national borders is proving to be a problem. When farmers in Indian Punjab burn straw stubble on their fields, smog settles over Lahore and produces days of air quality so low that even seeing a few feet away is very difficult. Nor is it smog alone, as many experts have pointed out. Pakistan’s status as a lower riparian vis-à-vis India also creates a security problem, serving as the sword of Damocles hanging over our collective heads. If the last few weeks have revealed the hell that climate change can be, imagine it multiplying many times over as rivers dry up permanently and drought becomes a regularity.

The nation-state model also fails because its outdated mechanisms are incapable of dealing with climate change fairly or equitably. Take for example the fact that Pakistan emits less carbon dioxide than most countries. Either way, no concessions are ever made for Pakistan to receive more resources to deal with climate challenges that it has contributed little to produce.

It follows, then, that one of the most important challenges of our time does not sit well with the nation-state model. Advances in studying ice cores from melting glaciers mean humans can now look at their planetary history stretching back thousands of years. The emergence and popularization of earth sciences such as geology and geophysics and others means that a large amount of data has been converted into numbers that can be put into predictive statistical models and reveal the future. Humans could barely predict the weather when the Treaty of Westphalia was signed; they can now predict weather and climate disasters with great accuracy. It is precisely this type of technology that has enabled humans to truly understand the depth of the climate catastrophe facing the planet.

Even though wars such as the one in Ukraine seem to emphasize the importance of the nation-state, and the construction of fortress-like border walls suggests as literal a meaning as possible of the nation-state, it may well be let this be the last gasp of the nation-state. Environmentalists point to the planet becoming a political unit such that its borders and general well-being become the basis for global cooperation. Simply put, the millennial-scale assessment of time made possible by scientific advances and supercomputers highlights the need for new political unities that focus on the interconnectedness of everyone and everything on the planet. The Covid-19 pandemic is arguably also the product of rising temperatures. He stressed that countries have yet to come up with a collective response.

The shift from nation-state to planetary cooperation is inevitable. The long-term vision of our planet, evidenced by ice cores from glaciers, revealed what the earth was like long before humans even. The planet is warming, habitats are disappearing, and environmental catastrophe is being courted and flirted with at every opportunity. The nation-state model of political organization has not produced the means to contain the greatest threat facing our planet. It might be time to consider a new one.

The author is a lawyer who teaches constitutional law and political philosophy.

[email protected]

Posted in Dawn, May 18, 2022

Virginians win $489 million in payday loan settlement – ​​Daily Press

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Online payday loan companies that charged up to 919% interest will spend $489 million to repay some 555,000 borrowers, to settle a class action lawsuit brought by eight Virginians.

The lawsuit alleged that Golden Valley Lending; Silver Cloud Financial, Inc.; Mountain Summit Financial, Inc.; and Majestic Lake Financial, Inc., all formed under the laws of the Habematolel Pomo Tribe of the Upper Lake Tribe in California, violated federal racketeering laws as well as Virginia’s usury and credit licensing laws to consumption.

He also leveled the same charges against three Kansas City, Missouri businessmen whose companies processed the loans, provided the capital the tribal corporations used to make the loans, and collected the bulk of the profits from the company.

Companies advertised online loans of up to $1,000 with the promise that borrowers could be approved in seconds. according to the lawsuit prepared by Consumer Litigation Associates based in Newport News, the Virginia Poverty Law Center and the law firm Kelly Guzzo in Fairfax.

One of the Virginians who sued, George Hengle, paid a total of $1,127 on three loans, with interest rates of 636%, 722% and 763%. Another, Steven Pike, paid $1,725 ​​on his loan with an interest rate of 744%, while Elwood Bumbray paid $1,561 on a loan with an interest rate of 543% and Lawrence Mwethuku paid $499.50 on a loan with an interest rate of 919%.

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Under the terms of the settlement, Tribal Businesses will forgive $450 million in balances owing on their loans. The businessmen will pay $39 million, which will be distributed to the borrowers as compensation.

Borrowers in Virginia, along with those in 21 other states, will get back any money they paid to lenders that exceeded their loan principal amount.

Borrowers in 26 other states will receive the difference between their state’s statutory interest rates and the interest they paid on their loans. Nevada and Utah borrowers will not receive any refunds; Utah has no formal cap on payday loan rates, and Nevada’s cap limits interest on payday loans to 25% of the borrower’s gross monthly income.

Virginia law caps loan rates at 12% unless a business obtains a consumer credit license. For these companies, the General Assembly capped rates at 36%, after years of daily press reports of high-interest loans.

The two law firms and the Poverty Law Center that filed the lawsuit have filed several others against payday and online lenders over the years, including one settled for $433 million in 2019.

The poverty law center also operates a helpline where borrowers can call for help at 866-830-4501.

Dave Ress, 757-247-4535, [email protected]

The Ponoka Broncs World Tour will continue this year – Ponoka News

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Ponoka Secondary Campus (PSC) students will soon be able to return to the battlefields and gravesites of fallen Canadian soldiers as part of the Broncs World Tour.

For over a decade, teacher Ron Labrie has guided his students on a journey to discover and uncover the biographies of all the Ponoka and area soldiers killed in action and ultimately visit their graves.

“It’s about icebergs,” Labrie said. “The tombstone is just the tip of the iceberg, but what is the story that lies beneath? Who is the soldier; what did they do in the service of the country and who were they as young people in Ponoka before the war?”

The Cenotaph Project and Broncs’ Word Tour grew out of the Year of the Veteran in 2005, where educators from across the county were invited to participate in a battlefield tour. This, combined with the 90th anniversary of Vimy Ridge in 2007, gave Labrie, an educator for 30 years now, the idea to launch the project.

“Due to logistics and cost, soldiers are buried where they died,” Labrie said. “For many years, there was little information available about the names of the young people inscribed on our local cenotaphs.”

Over the past decade, PSC students have uncovered the history of many of the names inscribed on the Ponoka Cenotaph.

“As we were learning about this decade-long project, we found some on the Cenotaph that actually survived the war,” Labrie said. “There are, no matter how hard we search, we can’t find any information, and then there are the very many who have been killed in service.”

Of the World War I names on the Ponoka Cenotaph, there are five names left for students to research out of 42, and five on the list of World War II names, out of 30.

“Research is the big part. It’s a great example of project-based learning,” Labrie said. “When the students receive this folder, it’s a sheaf of paper, but when they stand in front of the grave, it totally changes everything.”

As part of honoring the dead and serving as a living memory for the school, the Ponoka Secondary Campus developed the Hall of Valor displaying the names of Ponoka and area veterans. The classrooms are named after the battlefields of Canadian soldiers, such as Flanders, or Juno Beach and more recently Korea and Afghanistan.

“You have to work on remembrance,” Labrie said.

The Wolf Creek Board of Directors has approved in principle for students to travel overseas again in the 2022/23 school year for the Broncs World Tour. Approval will be reviewed prior to the new school year trip. For the past two years, the tour has been canceled due to COVID-19 travel restrictions.

– Submitted by Wolf Creek Public Schools

Wolf Creek Public Schools

History of the attraction: 20,000 leagues under the sea

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Magic Kingdom’s (and Disneyland Park’s) long-running classic attraction, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, has a rich history. Even though its disappearance from Disney theme parks in the United States is obvious, the attraction still lives today in other worldwide Disney parks, hidden gems, and will secure its own Disney+ limited series. If you’re a fan of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, let’s see where you can get your Disney Society of Adventurers and Explorers fix with Captain Nemo!

History of Disney’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea Ride

Disneyland Park hosted “Submarine Voyage” from June 14, 1959 to September 9, 1998, before closing and becoming Finding Nemo Submarine Voyage. While the ride debuted after the famous Captain Nemo movie, it entertained guests with a sense of adventure and a unique ride perspective. However, it was merely the predecessor to Magic Kingdom’s 1971 opening day attraction, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. The latter featured an IP based on the 1954 ride and combined elements found in Disneyland Park with the film.

Offering rides aboard the USS Nautilus, Disney Park visitors were taken for an ocean tour in a submarine, with small windows showcasing a passing seascape as aerial audio described the crew saga. The Magic Kingdom attraction was a hit on opening day and still holds a place in the hearts of many Disney park fans.

Credit: Disney

The ride started with a top-loading, two-sided system. The guests had folding seats and a porthole each. Wikipedia has a full point-by-point runtime of the ride, which will remind any guest who has experienced the attraction of the entertainment that awaits.

The adventure began as guests descended into the rear of the submarine, leaned over to miss the low-level raised rear hatch, and found a place on board. Throughout the journey, an eerie organ version of the Disney movie’s main theme would play on an endless loop, allowing for storytelling support as well as a drop-out music track if needed. After the standard Disney-style introduction and helmsman’s safety notes, the narration, in the voice of Captain Nemo, would begin.

With the submarine clear of the dock, the diving sequence began, with hundreds of air bubbles filling the view from the porthole, creating the illusion of descent. Once cleared, the captain introduced himself to his passengers, then showed them the underwater plains around Vulcania. In the lagoon, guests could see moray eels, crabs, lobsters, bass, clams and turtles as well as a multitude of small tropical fish.

Minutes later, in another homage to the Disney film, an “underwater party” of divers would appear, as animatronics wearing replicas of scuba diving gear designed by Harper Goff worked on beds of kelp and argued with wayward turtles.

nautilus walt disney world
Credit: Wikipedia

With the waterfall bubbles at the entrance to the cavern simulating a surface storm, the captain ordered the submarine to descend into the depths as a precaution, and guests entered the show’s construction section of the attraction. Within minutes, the devastation such a natural phenomenon can create was on full display with the eerie Graveyard of Lost Ships, with centuries-old shipwrecks littering the seabed, guarded by the silent, hovering silhouettes of sharks.

Leaving the destruction behind, the Nautilus would reach the North Pole, circling the polar ice cap below the surface and narrowly avoiding the large stabbing icebergs in the water. Venturing deeper, the Nautilus entered the eerie world of the Abyss, where guests saw examples of the many strange and bizarre species of deep-sea fish that thrive in such an environment.

Up slightly, one of the latest discoveries made is the ruins of Atlantis, complete with a typical Disney sea serpent, accompanying mermaids and a treasure trove full of jewels and gold. With the ruins of ancient civilization soon abandoned, the Nautilus would enter the final phase of its journey, with a tribute to the most iconic and memorable part of the 1954 Disney film: the attack of the giant squid. After seeing a much smaller sister, Nautilus, trapped in the clutches of one of these creatures (oddly marked XIII on the tail fin), the passenger sub would itself be attacked by long flapping tentacles.

With a final push to the surface, the Nautilus would clear the caverns of the dangerous squid and enter the safety of the tropical lagoon, en route to the dock.

20,000 leagues under the sea magic kingdom of the nautilus
Credit: walt dated world

20,000 Leagues Under the Sea has a history of closure hampered by disappointment, as the closure was never officially announced before the attraction was demolished. It was a favorite of those visiting Magic Kingdom, despite its exorbitant maintenance costs and low carrying capacity compared to other attractions. Without notice, the ride was closed on September 14, 1994 for a period of maintenance. Although the attraction was supposed to reopen in 1996, it was permanently closed.

Three fan-favorite underwater vehicles have been rescued from the fleet and installed behind the scenes for Walt Disney World guests to view. The others were scrapped. Two ships were sunk at Castaway Cay for snorkeling and artificial reef development, but one was so badly damaged due to weather conditions that it was pulled. The third vehicle was parked as a backstage feature for those on the Backlot Tour at Disney’s Hollywood Studios, but was eventually moved to an empty lot. After Disney’s Hollywood Studios redesign for Toy Story Land and Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge, the submarine was shut down, to be retired for runDisney and other events.

shipwrecked nautilus cay
Nautilus Castaway CayCredit: Reddit

Meanwhile, the giant lagoon and 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea ride area was renamed “Ariel’s Grotto” and a King Triton Fountain was installed. This lasted until 2004, when the entire area was demolished, making way for Pooh’s Playful Spot (2005). This playground would give way in 2016 to Magic Kingdom’s large Enchanted Forest Fantasyland expansion, including Storybook Circus, Seven Dwarfs Mine Train, Under the Sea: Journey of the Little Mermaid, and Be Our Guest Restaurant, among other attractions.

However, the Imagineers were not without a sense of history. They hid a silhouette of the Nautilus in The Little Mermaid: Ariel’s Undersea Adventure in a rock face, and there’s a small sculpture of the Nautilus inside Piglet’s Treehouse. Trader Sam’s Grog Grotto also hosts a cocktail called (and served in a) Nautilus!

nautilus sam cocktail trader
Nautilus cocktail from Trader Sam’s Grotto Credit: Reddit

Which Disney parks have the 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea ride?

Thanks to global Disney parks like Disneyland Paris and Tokyo DisneySEA, we can get League-flavored excitement. At Disneyland Paris, you can experience “Les Mystères du Nautilus” (that’s French for “The Mysteries of the Nautilus”), which is a step-by-step attraction. This is an updated version of the 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea walkthrough attraction that stood at Disneyland in Anaheim, California in the early 1950s, based on the movie of the same name, before to be transformed into an underwater voyage. Although not the original ride, it is very similar and will give fans a taste of the movie.

Tokyo DisneySEA greets guests in a small remote-controlled submarine developed by Captain Nemo. They go on a tour to explore the underwater world, but of course the remote goes wrong and as the sub attempts to rise, the sub is attacked by the Kraken and loses control, resulting in a detour into an unknown world.

tokyo disneysea 20000 leagues under the sea
Credit: Tokyo disneySEA

But what about the original car? For Disney fans who loved the 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea attraction, there’s still a chance to relive the attraction! Thanks to the Defunctland virtual reality project, you can now climb back onto the Nautilus underwater ship and sail with Captain Nemo and the crew. An entire YouTube series hosted and created by Kevin Perjurer delves into defunct theme park attractions like JAWS the Ride, ExtraTERRORestrial: Alien Encounter, Back to the Future, Captain EO, and more. Each episode of the Defunctland series is an Imagineering story and mashup, creating a digital theme park out of once-beloved attractions. Even Disney Hollywood Studios’ Sorcerer Hat is getting a VR experience.

vr 20000 leagues under the sea
1 credit: Defunctland

the Nautilus Disney+ TV Series

For big fans of this classic attraction, Disney+ will host a 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea series titled, Nautilus. In development for over six years, the show will be streaming-focused and is written and executive produced by James Dormer. According to the film’s director, Bryan Singer (X-Men), 20th Century Fox’s version of Jules Verne’s classic “steampunk” inspirational novel, which is set to begin filming later this year, will depend heavily on the tensions of post-reconstruction the American Civil War.

Acting as a prequel to the original titular 1954 film starring Kirk Douglas, Nautilus will follow Captain Nemo in his youth before he meets Ned Land, as an “Indian prince bereft of his birthright and family”, who is a prisoner of the East India Company – the same company determined to destroy Jack Sparrow in Pirates of the Caribbean — and is determined to right the wrong that stole his life. The series will see the mysterious Captain Nemo battling enemies and discovering “magical undersea worlds” with his motley crew aboard the Nautilus, surely proving to be a storybook-worthy adventure,” reports Collider.

20000 leagues-under-the-sea-nautilus disney plus art
Credit: Disney

For Disney fans who wish we had one more sci-fi chance to dive deep into the sea, we highly recommend planning a trip to Disneyland Park and swimming with Dory on the Finding Nemo Underwater Journey, which will give you the physical experience of the Nautilus contraption and a similar 3D puppet aquarium visual of the original 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea attraction.

Are you a fan of the 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea attraction? Leave us a comment below!

PM sets up climate change task force amid heatwave and melting glaciers

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ISLAMABAD: Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif on Monday set up a task force on climate change in view of the heat wave and melting glaciers in the country.

The task force included relevant federal ministers, secretaries, provincial chief secretaries and relevant provincial secretaries, the chairman of the National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) and senior officials from other agencies.

The task force will develop a comprehensive strategy to mitigate the effects of climate change in the country and prevent incidents such as the glacier incident in Hunza.

Chairing a high-level emergency meeting on the recent heat wave and the effects of climate change, the Prime Minister ordered action to prevent food and water shortages and to conserve water and forests .

The meeting was attended by Federal Ministers Syed Khurshid Shah, Sherry Rehman, Ehsas-ur-Rehman Mazari, Tariq Bashir Cheema, Maryam Aurangzeb, NDMA Chairman Lt. Gen. Akhtar Nawaz and heads of relevant agencies. Participation by video link of Federal Minister of Education Rana Tanveer Hussain and Provincial Secretaries.

Prime Minister Sharif ordered to take immediate action in this regard and report back at the next meeting. The meeting was informed that climate change was the main reason for the intense heat wave and that Pakistan was the fifth most vulnerable country in the world in terms of climate change.

It was pointed out that Pakistan, although having significant glacier reserves, was also threatened by water scarcity which could have a direct impact on the country’s agriculture. The Prime Minister ordered to formulate a comprehensive strategy in this regard on an urgent basis and also underlined the launching of a public awareness campaign for water conservation.

He called for immediate action to ensure rainwater storage before the next monsoon.

The Prime Minister was also informed of the water shortage in Cholistan, to which he directed an immediate supply of water for human settlements and animals. He ordered to ensure immediate relief activities during the recent heat wave in Cholistan by the district administration and relevant agencies.

Prime Minister Sharif ordered the chairman of NDMA to go to Hunza immediately and also insisted on the reconstruction of the bridge which collapsed during the melting of the glaciers. The Prime Minister also requested a detailed report at the next meeting regarding the progress of the construction of the bridge.

Prime Minister Sharif also ordered the Ministry of Education to implement SOPs to prevent the recent heat wave in public schools and to order private schools to implement them. He ordered the Ministry of Health to immediately submit a detailed report on the research and possible effects of the new COVID-19 subvariant.


Concert at Hawk Mountain to Benefit Injured Chainsaw Carver [Spotlight] – Reading eagle

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Concert at Hawk Mountain to Benefit Injured Chainsaw Carver [Spotlight] – Reading eagle

Hawk Mountain Sanctuary, Kempton, will host Road to Recovery, a concert in aid of Todd Gladfelter, the chainsaw carver who created artwork for the sanctuary’s amphitheater, on May 28, from 11:45 a.m. to 5 p.m. . Gladfelter suffered a spinal cord injury. during a fall last November. Free entry; donations will be requested.

Scheduled concerts are Keith Brintzenhoff at 11:45 a.m., Crow Hill at noon, Luke Hertzog at 1 a.m., Texas Rose Band at 1:15 a.m., Big Valley Bluegrass at 2 a.m., The Youngers at 3 a.m., and Dave Kline and the Mountain Folk Band at 4 a.m. The day will end with the singing of “You’ll Never Walk Alone” and a final jam featuring Gladfelter, Kline and other musicians.

Gladfelter has designed several replicas of 32 species of native Appalachian wildlife, and the resulting work makes the amphitheater a destination in itself. He has received many accolades in the sculpting world, including championships at the Mid-Atlantic National Chainsaw Competition. His work building his log home was detailed in the book “Log Cabin Years: How One Couple Built a Home From Scratch and Created a Life”, written by his wife, Cindy Ross.

“Todd Gladfelter’s work has made the Sanctuary Amphitheater an iconic space for all,” said Sanctuary President Sean Grace. “It’s a chance for the community to come together in support of Todd and his family.”

Kline, a Berks County singer-songwriter, community advocate and friend of Gladfelter and his wife, coordinated the musicians for the day.

“Todd’s tragic fall left him with a spinal cord injury and debilitating paralysis in multiple areas of his body, but he bravely pushed through those deficits and continues to recover and progress steadily,” Kline said. “This fundraiser will help Todd and his family pay for medical bills, therapies and disability services.”

Bring a blanket or camping chair to sit on. Vince’s Cheesesteaks and The Nesting Box ice cream food trucks will be on site.

For more information, visit hawkmountain.org/events or call 610-756-6961.

Music

DCappella have announced a fall US tour, “Deck the Halls With Disney Featuring DCappella”, which will include a stop at the Santander Performing Arts Centre, Reading, on December 18.

Last week, in honor of Star Wars Day, DCappella, Disney’s first a cappella singing sensation, unveiled a video for “Cantina Band,” their rendition of the John Williams-composed song that appeared in the film. from 1977’s “Star Wars: A New Hope”. .”

The “Cantina Band” video marks the first time an outside film crew has been allowed to shoot Oga’s Cantina in Star Wars: Galaxy’s Edge at Disney’s Hollywood Studios at Walt Disney World, and the first music video ever captured on location. . The song is part of “Magic Reimagined,” DCappella’s latest EP, released on Friday.

Known for their reimagined classics from the Disney songbook, DCappella was originally formed following a nationwide search for the best a cappella and on-stage vocal performance talent. Since debuting on the “American Idol” stage on Disney Night in 2018, DCappella has toured across North America and Japan.

Tickets have also gone on sale for A Day To Remember, whose ‘Just Some Shows Tour’ will stop at Santander Arena on August 6, with openings The Ghost Inside and Bad Omens. Earlier this year, A Day To Remember shared a new version of their single “Re-Entry” featuring Blink-182’s Mark Hoppus. “Re-Entry” originally appeared on A Day To Remember’s final studio album. “You’re welcome.” The 14-track collection is highlighted by singles “Brick Wall”, “Degenerates”, “Resentment”, “Mindreader” and the No. 1 Active Rock hit single “Everything We Need”.

Other new show announcements include Latin singer-songwriter Carin Leon, who will appear July 29 at the Santander Arena. and comedian/YouTuber Daniel Howell, appearing Oct. 21 at the Santander Performing Arts Center. Tickets for all shows are on sale at ticketmaster.com.

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Berks Youth Chorus will perform the final concert of its 30th anniversary season, “Songs of Belonging,” today at 4 p.m. at Atonement Lutheran Church, Wyomissing. The concert will include performances by two BYC ensembles: MasterSingers (grades 8-12) and Chorale (children grades 4-7), both conducted by Sam Barge.

Tickets are $10 for general admission, $5 for students and $25 for VIPs and will be available at the door.

“Songs of Belonging” will also bring relief to victims of the conflict in Ukraine as part of the BYC Chorus for Causes project. The singers designed conflict awareness wristbands to sell at the concert, with proceeds going to Save the Children, an organization that serves the needs of crisis-affected children.

The music will include African American spirituals, American folk tunes, pop songs and musical theater tunes, all centered on messages of hope, compassion, gratitude and resilience.

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The “Unleashing Your Inner Opera Fan” series continues Tuesday at 7 p.m. in the Wyomissing Highlands. The 60-80 minute multimedia presentation will be led by Berks Opera Director of Education and Outreach, David Richie.

The opera presented will be “Lucia di Lammermoor” by Donizetti, with star singer Kevin Patrick, baritone, who has sung with Opera Delaware, Boheme Opera New Jersey, Baltimore Concert Opera and Delaware Valley Opera Company. He made his off-Broadway debut in 2017 in “Dorian Gray: The Musical” at the New York New Musical Festival.

Admission is $20 for adults and seniors, $15 for those under 30, payable at the door by cash or check, or use the “Donate” button on berksopera.org.

An HD Met broadcast of “Lucia di Lammermoor” will air Saturday at 12:55 p.m. at Fox Berkshire, Wyomissing. Reserve your tickets at foxshowtimes.com.

juggling party

The Cascade Brigade Juggling Club at Brandywine Heights High School will present a juggling festival on Saturdays from noon to 9 p.m., with a free performance at 6:30 p.m. in the high school’s auditorium. The event includes juggling lessons, workshops and games.

Expert jugglers Jen Slaw and Michael Karas, who took part in the International Juggling Festival and performed off-Broadway, will perform in the evening show, which is free. (A canned donation voucher for Friend, Inc. is requested.)

The Cascade Brigade Jugglers will also perform in the show and do a black light stage, which is done in the dark with lighted equipment. Students will also juggle balls, rings, Poi, devil sticks, diablos, clubs and scarves.

Theater

The Pines Dinner Theater in Allentown is staging “Why Do Fools Fall in Love?” » until June 26th. Written and created by Roger Bean, the show centers on an impromptu bachelorette party where Millie (Gianna Graziano) and her best friends Sally (Shannon Cabato Berg), Florence (Aviana Rivera) and Dee Dee (Elizabeth Robinson) dive in age-old questions about love, marriage, and the crushing dating game. As the celebration grows, the girls reveal secrets about their love life, as they poke fun and challenge each other to take control of their lives.

Featuring 1960s pop hits such as “My Boy Lollipop”, “I Will Follow Him”, “You Don’t Have To Say You Love Me” and “Hey There Lonely Boy”, the show reaffirms that during the struggles of life, true friendship will prevail.

Ticket prices are $32 for adults and $22 for ages 2-12, which includes a seat for the show, all taxes, and box office fees. All appetizers, main courses, desserts and beverages are available à la carte at an additional cost. The show is rated PG.

For show times and ticket information, call the box office at 610-433-2333 or visit pinesdinnertheatre.com.

Art

Yocum Institute for Arts Education, West Lawn, will host “Altered Scapes”, a group exhibition of paintings, mixed media, ceramics and glass, from May 28 to June 30 at its Holleran Gallery, with an opening reception on May 27, from 5 a.m. to 7 p.m.

The works focus on the mix of unique colors, shapes and textures that the Earth shares with us. These landscapes, depicting land, sea or sky, reflect the expressive and moving interpretations of the beauty of the Earth by five female artists: Linda RohrbachAusterberry, Maureen Bowie, Rhonda Counts, Maxine Rhoads and Elaine Soltis.

Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.

Film

Reading Public Library will join in the celebration of Queen Elizabeth’s Platinum Jubilee on June 4 with festivities starting at 11am and including a screening of the film ‘The Queen’, starring Helen Mirren, accompanied by refreshments. A Princess Tea Party will be held at the Youth Library beginning at 1:30 p.m. Both events will take place at the Main Library, 100 S. Fifth St. They are free and no advance registration is required.

New book’s world tour of boreal forests establishes their value to life on Earth

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“The Treeline: The Last Forest and the Future of Life on Earth”

By Ben Rawlence. Press Saint-Martin, 2022. 307 pages. $29.99.

The boreal forest, that ring of trees that circles the globe at high latitudes, is the largest living system after the ocean; it is also the “lung” of the planet and therefore the key to the health of our planet. Ben Rawlence, who lives in Wales and whose latest book was about a refugee camp in Africa, shared his human rights concerns at the disastrous effects of climate change. From 2018 to 2021, he traveled the forests of the north – in Norway, Russia, Alaska, Canada and Greenland – to meet locals and scientists and to learn for himself what is happening with the trees. further north and the life associated with them.

How interesting can treeline be? Incredibly interesting, it turns out that the subject is in the hands of such a talented researcher and writer. A book about trees can, we find, turn the page. Part travel adventure, part deep dive into emerging science, part reflection on our history on Earth, part philosophical questioning of Earth’s fate – “The Treeline” is a vivid and beautifully written weave of fascinating topics.

Organizationally, the book travels the world, with each chapter focusing not just on a different forest, but on the tree species most important to that forest. A map at the beginning, looking towards the North Pole, shows the forests, their northern extent, and the main communities the author visited.

Rawlence begins in its neighboring Scotland, considered the limit of the Arctic treeline in Europe, although most of its trees were felled centuries ago. Forest succession after the last ice age led Scots pine to cover about 80% of the territory in the past. Today, ‘rewilding’ efforts aim to restore some of this great woodland, but global warming projections suggest the UK’s climate will soon be too inhospitable for pine trees.

In the next chapter, featuring Norway and the downy or European white birch, Rawlence visits the Sami reindeer herders of the far north. Here and elsewhere, the author makes it abundantly clear that forest health is directly linked to human rights and the abilities of indigenous peoples to maintain their cultural connections and livelihoods. The warmer, wetter weather has caused the Norwegian birch to “race” across the tundra, reducing the habitat required by reindeer and their herders.

In the chapter on Russia, featuring larch, Rawlence visits several forest areas in winter and meets with scientists and indigenous people. He travels hundreds of miles in a tank-like vehicle with huge tires to find the world’s northernmost trees – spindly larches that grow in extreme cold on thick permafrost. Elsewhere, the thawing of the permafrost causes the water tables to rise and the “drowning” of the larches. He learns that scientists predict that at least 50% of Siberia’s forest will turn into treeless steppe by the end of this century.

By the time Rawlence investigated Alaska’s treeline and dominant spruce species, the world was in the midst of COVID-19 lockdowns. Unable to visit in person, he did an impressive job studying maps, photos and reports and talking to researchers and residents. As he points out, “Alaska is the most studied region of the Arctic; the United States has the resources and the scientific clout that other nations lack… a frontier in our understanding of what is happening in geographical and scientific terms. He details his conversations in Alaska with Ken Tape, who studied how beavers have recently transformed the landscape; writer Seth Kantner, who grew up along the Kobuk River treeline; and Roman Dial, who has studied the evolution of vegetative dynamics, particularly that of spruce, in the Arctic for more than 40 years. It also details the influences of fungal networks on forest health, how warmer air affects photosynthesis, and the relationship between Alaska spruce evapotranspiration and precipitation in the US Midwest.

In Canada, Rawlence spent time in Ontario with Diana Beresford-Kroger, “one of the most eminent scholars of the boreal forest” – and, we learn, the model for a character in the novel “The Overstory” by Richard Powers – then in and around Churchill on Hudson’s Bay. Here, we learn how critical the northern forest is to regulating water, air, soil, climate, and ocean productivity. We also learn where the subtitle of the book comes from, referring to “the last forest”. Beresford-Kroger believes that the Amazon and other rainforests are “probably finished,” threatened because they are not just from intentional deforestation, but from drying out and burning. The boreal forest, spanning a wide range of temperatures, has perhaps the best chance of adaptation. In Canada, its flagship species is balsam poplar, or cottonwood poplar.

Rawlence’s last stop – in organization, not in real time – is Greenland. As the island’s ice cap melts, the land becomes more habitable for trees, of which there are four native species, primarily mountain ash or mountain ash. Rawlence joins a tree-planting group and discusses the emerging field of “strategic ecology,” which is not based on current climatic conditions but on assumptions about the future. “Assisted migration” is another term related to helping species, including trees, move to places where they could survive a warmer world.

Ultimately, by showing how the boreal forest interacts with all life on Earth, Rawlence paints a grim picture of where we are headed. It does not offer false hope but rather speaks of a necessary change in the way humans live. “Curiosity and observation are the humble but radical conditions for a new relationship with the Earth. Systems change when there is a culture that demands it. The revolution begins with a walk in the woods. Rawlence’s contributions to the cause include founding and directing Black Mountains College, a school in Wales dedicated to teaching climate change mitigation and adaptation skills.

Total lunar eclipse: the moon will appear to turn red for many lucky earthlings

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Many earthlings will be able to see the Moon briefly turn red on Sunday. The event will mark the first total lunar eclipse this year.

The rare visual is caused by the Moon passing through Earth’s shadow, blocking much of the Sun’s light from reaching our nearest neighbor.

The wonderful thing is that when the Moon is entirely in shadow…the Moon will appear to your eyes as some sort of pink or orange color,” said Michelle Thaller, a NASA scientist.

“The only light rising on the Moon at this point is the light streaming through the Earth’s atmosphere.”

However, not everyone will have the same vision of the event. Those in South America and parts of North America will be able to see a full eclipse.

While others from regions as far apart as New Zealand and Eastern Europe may see a partial eclipse.

The event comes as scientists prepare to return to the surface of the Moon, as it still has much to teach us.

“What I find most important about the Moon is that its surface has been largely unchanged for billions of years since practically the beginning of the solar system. And on Earth, of course, we have no not that opportunity,” Thaller said.

NASA plans to land a crew on the surface of the Moon by 2024. And next year it will attempt to land a lunar rover called VIPER.

The rover will search for resources at the Moon’s south pole, such as possible ice, so that the agency can one day establish a base camp on our celestial neighbor.

This is a crucial step in order to one day be able to explore Mars. “When people go to Mars, they’ll have to be completely independent. They’ll have to be able to fix their spacecraft, deal with any kind of medical emergency. Even communications will be more complicated with people on Mars,” Thaller added.

“The moon is this planetary body that we can stand on and test things out, and really expose our technology to this rugged space environment.

“And so, to me, that seems like an obvious testing ground to go further into the solar system.”

Virginia Court Approved $489 Million in Aid for Victims of Illegal Internet Payday Loans

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RICHMOND, Va. (WRIC) – The federal court in Richmond has given preliminary approval to a class action settlement that would provide $489 million in relief to victims of illegal internet lending.

The ruling was released Thursday, May 12, and will affect approximately 555,000 consumers who have been charged more than 600% interest on loans by predatory internet payday lenders.

Litigation against predatory lenders began more than three years ago when a coalition of law firms, including the Virginia Poverty Law Center, Kelly Guzzo and Consumer Litigation Associates, came together to address the ongoing challenge of lending illegal wages.

“These law firms have taken the illegal lenders to court,” said Jay Speer, executive director of the Virginia Poverty Law Center. “We are very grateful for their tenacity and passion in engaging in this three-year fight for today’s settlement.”

Today’s settlement is one of many these law firms have secured with illegal internet lenders in recent years, including a $433 million settlement in 2019.

The proposed settlement provides $450 million in consumer debt forgiveness that will be paid in cash for most consumers.

The settlement will also set aside $39 million for the creation of a common fund for those who have repaid illegal amounts.

Settlement Class Members will not need to submit a Claim Form and will receive notice by email or US Mail.

In addition to litigation, VPLC assists borrowers through the organization’s predatory lending hotline (866-830-4501) and advocate for better laws to protect borrowers.

StockNews.com puts Glacier Bancorp (NASDAQ:GBCI) on “Hold”

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Bancorp Glacier (NASDAQ: GBCIGet a rating) has been updated by StockNews.com from a “sell” rating to a “hold” rating in a research report released Thursday to clients and investors.

Separately, Zacks Investment Research downgraded Glacier Bancorp from a “buy” rating to a “hold” rating in a report on Tuesday, February 1.

Shares of GBCI opened at $46.35 on Thursday. The company has a market capitalization of $5.13 billion, a price-earnings ratio of 17.36 and a beta of 0.87. The company has a 50-day moving average of $49.08 and a 200-day moving average of $53.61. The company has a debt ratio of 0.09, a current ratio of 0.62 and a quick ratio of 0.62. Glacier Bancorp has a 1 year minimum of $44.43 and a 1 year maximum of $62.00.

Bancorp Glacier (NASDAQ: GBCIGet a rating) last reported results on Thursday, April 21. The bank reported earnings per share of $0.61 for the quarter, meeting analyst consensus estimates of $0.61. Glacier Bancorp had a return on equity of 10.02% and a net margin of 32.03%. In the same period of the previous year, the company had earned earnings per share of $0.85. As a group, sell-side analysts expect Glacier Bancorp to post year-to-date EPS of 2.76.

Institutional investors have recently changed their positions in the company. Clearstead Advisors LLC acquired a new stake in Glacier Bancorp in the third quarter worth approximately $26,000. Covestor Ltd acquired a new stake in Glacier Bancorp in the fourth quarter worth approximately $28,000. Byrne Asset Management LLC acquired a new stake in Glacier Bancorp in the fourth quarter worth approximately $29,000. Ten Capital Wealth Advisors LLC acquired a new stake in Glacier Bancorp in the third quarter worth approximately $51,000. Finally, Rockefeller Capital Management LP increased its stake in Glacier Bancorp by 665.8% in the third quarter. Rockefeller Capital Management LP now owns 919 shares of the bank valued at $50,000 after acquiring an additional 799 shares during the period. 68.64% of the shares are held by hedge funds and other institutional investors.

About Glacier Bancorp (Get a rating)

Glacier Bancorp, Inc operates as a bank holding company for Glacier Bank which provides commercial banking services to individuals, small and medium businesses, community organizations and public entities in the United States. It offers non-interest bearing deposit accounts and interest bearing deposit accounts, such as negotiable withdrawal orders and demand deposit accounts, savings accounts, money market deposit accounts, fixed rate deposit, negotiated rate jumbo certificates and individual retirement accounts.

Further reading



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Justin Min’s Sparrow Academy Ben

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Earlier today, series star Justin Min and showrunner & EP Steve Blackman open on what viewers can expect from that alternate Ben Hargreeves in the third season of Netflix’s adaptation of Gerard Road & Gabriel Bait is The Umbrella Academy (More on that in a minute). But now we have the second part of this update, in the form of three new preview images highlighting Sparrow Academy’s brash and arrogant No. 2. Here is an overview…

cr. Christos Kalohoridis/Netflix © 2022
The Umbrella Academy S03 Spotlight: Justin Min's Sparrow Academy Ben
cr. Courtesy of Netflix © 2022
umbrella academy
The Umbrella Academy. cr. Christos Kalohoridis/Netflix © 2022

In the following highlights from their interview with EOMin and Blackman discuss key differences between Umbrella Academy and Sparrow Academy, how Min’s two “Bens” compare, what it was like to offer an alternate reality take on a beloved character, and more Again :

Min is believed to be done with TUA after Ben’s Season 2 finale sacrifice: “It was a very emotional day for me because I thought it was my last day on set. I was completely foggy. I remember going to my hair and makeup artists and saying, ‘ thank you so much for being with me on this journey. I gave them thank you cards!”

Blackman on the difference between Fundamental Umbrella Academy and Sparrow Academy“The way I thought about Season 3 is that the Umbrellas are a family that never knew how to be superheroes. The Sparrows are superheroes who never knew how to be a family. C That’s the fundamental difference in how they go about being superheroes.”

Min on the impact raising a “sparrow” and not an “umbrella” had on Ben: “Steve [Blackman] and I really talked at length about this balance between nature and nurture, and what it would do to someone like Ben. I think Ben, at his core, is a very impressionable person, so I think education is a huge driving force behind who Ben is and who Ben becomes. So in this alternate reality where they’re trained as these powerful assassins and superheroes that are famous and well-known, those are all things that we talked about, leaving a big impression on Ben.”

Min made sure ‘Sparrow’ Ben wouldn’t be confused with ‘Umbrella’ Ben (and it was ‘exhausting’)“I worked with a voice coach while I was filming to lower my range a bit, as well as learn how to project more. And they wanted me to physically embody the character, so I had to go to the gym for the first time in many years. Having those external factors in place in terms of body and voice really helped me to inhabit the character in a real and compelling way.

Unlike his “Umbrella” counterpart, “Sparrow” Ben is more than fine with using his powers.“I think the previous version of Ben was afraid of his powers. It was something he never fully learned to control on his own, so when those tentacles went wild he didn’t know what But since the Sparrows have been trained from a young age to use their powers in battle, it’s something the new Ben feels a lot more in control of. to assert his superiority. In the very first montage where we feature the Sparrows, you even see him using his tentacles to smoke a cigar and drink. It’s something he goes out as a party trick and will do very casually. He has control over it and he is very proud of it.

After putting an end to the 1963 apocalypse, the Umbrella Academy returns home to the present, convinced that they have prevented the initial apocalypse and fixed this cursed timeline once and for all. But after a brief moment of celebration, they realize things aren’t quite (okay, not at all) the way they left them. Enter Sparrow Academy. Clever, elegant, and about as warm as a sea of ​​icebergs, the Sparrows immediately confront the Umbrellas in a violent confrontation that turns out to be the least of everyone’s worries. Navigating their own unique challenges, losses and surprises – and facing an unidentified destructive entity wreaking havoc on the universe (something they may have caused) – now all that all they have to do is convince Dad’s new and possibly better family to help them right what their arrival has done wrong. Will they find their way back to their pre-apocalyptic life? Or is this new world about to reveal more than just a glitch in the timeline?

umbrella academy
cr. Courtesy of Netflix © 2022
umbrella academy
The Umbrella Academy. cr. Courtesy of Netflix © 2022

The Umbrella Academy stars Tom Hopper like Luther aka Spaceboy aka Number One, David Castaneda like Diego aka The Kraken aka Number Two, Emmy Raver Lampman like Allison aka The Rumor aka Number Three, Robert Sheehan like Klaus aka The Séance aka Number Four, Aidan Gallagher as Five aka The Boy, Justin H. Min like Ben aka The Horror aka Number Six/Ben aka Sparrow Number 2, Elliot Page like Viktor aka The White Violin aka Number Seven, Colm Feore as Sir Reginald Hargreeves, and Ritu Arya like Lilac. And speaking of Sparrow Academy, we also have Justin Cornwell as Marcus aka Number One, Britne Oldford as Fei aka Number Three, Jake Epstein like Alphonso aka Number Four, Genesis Rodriguez as Sloane aka Number Five, Cassie David as Jayme aka Number Six, and Psykronium cube inducing existential terror as Christopher aka Number Seven. Besides, Javon Walton (Euphoria, Utopia) joined the cast in an undisclosed role.

The Umbrella Academy S03 Spotlight: Justin Min's Sparrow Academy Ben
Picture: Netflix

Created by showrunner and executive producer Blackman and produced by UCP (a division of Universal Studio Group) for Netflix, The Umbrella Academy is also produced by Jeff F. King, Keith Goldberg, Mike Richardson & Jeremy Webbwith Way & Ba co-executive production and Steve Wakefield produce.

Posted in: Netflix, Preview, streaming, TV | Tagged: justin min, netflix, preview, season 3, umbrella academy

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Launch of NASA’s CAPSTONE Cubes to the Moon postponed to May 31

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A tiny moon-bound spacecraft will wait at least a few more days to launch.

Liftoff for the CAPSTONE mission, short for Cislunar Autonomous Positioning System Technology Operations and Navigation Experiment, has been pushed back four days to May 31 at the earliest, NASA announced this week.

“We will continuously assess the date of the first target launch attempt during the launch window, which extends through June 22,” agency officials wrote Wednesday, May 11 on its blog for the Artemis Moon program. The message did not specify why the launch was slightly delayed.

The microwave-sized CAPSTONE spacecraft will launch from New Zealand aboard a Rocket Lab Electron rocket with a Lunar Photon upper stage. Its mission is to verify the stability of a near-rectilinear halo orbit (NRHO) around the moon, by modeling what Gateway – the small lunar-orbiting space station that is a key part of the Artemis plan – will need to follow with astronauts on board.

Related: Rocket Lab and its Electron booster (photos)

Artist's rendering of the power and propulsion element of Gateway, the orbital base NASA plans to build to anchor human exploration of the moon.

Artist’s rendering of the power and propulsion element of Gateway, the orbital base NASA plans to build to anchor human exploration of the moon. (Image credit: NASA)

The planned orbit will bring CAPSTONE within 1,000 miles (1,600 kilometers) of a lunar pole at its closest point, providing access to the south pole. It is the primary target of crewed Artemis missions, given the likely presence of water ice in the permanently shadowed polar craters.

At its highest altitude, CAPSTONE will hover 43 times higher at 43,500 miles (70,000 km). The advantage of such an orbit is that future spacecraft to and from the lunar surface at the south pole will not need to fly as high to meet Gateway, but the halo orbit has not yet been tested by other spacecraft.

To complicate matters, the moon has known mascons (mass concentrations) that can disrupt orbits. NASA is therefore looking for an inexpensive test before sending the much more expensive Gateway into such orbit.

CAPSTONE’s secondary mission is to evaluate spacecraft navigation and communication systems with NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, which has circled the moon since 2009. CAPSTONE was originally scheduled to fly in 2021, but the mission was delayed from then on due to COVID-related issues.

Follow Elizabeth Howell on Twitter @howellspace. follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

Journey to the End of the Earth

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“As the largest island in the Svalbard archipelago, Spitsbergen has a variety of wildlife and history that will appeal to visitors,” says Erwin-Rose. “Visiting Ny-Ålesund, the northernmost city in the world, is a highlight – this city was once the starting point for many expeditions to the North Pole.

Le Commandant Charcot combines the best of French luxury with expert polar guidance. PONANT

“Glaciers dominate the landscape here, and guests will have the opportunity to view these stunning structures from the ship and from the fleet of zodiac boats. Polar bears, walruses and whales rule this beautiful, wild and remote part of Norway and a meeting with them is always a very special event.

Spitsbergen is the last piece of land before the Arctic sea ice begins – once you’ve said goodbye to its jagged coastline and thousand-year-old glaciers, there’s only ice and ocean before your expedition begins. reaches the geographic North Pole. This is the time to watch, transfixed, Commander Charcot cut through the ice, heading ever north, until you finally arrive at 90 degrees north latitude, the apex of the spin axis of Earth.

The geographic North Pole is covered in ice all year round – it is permanently dark for six months, then permanently light for the rest of the year. It is a place that has fascinated explorers and held an almost mythical presence for so many others, a zone of deep calm and a true must-visit experience.

And then, of course, it’s time to turn back to Spitsbergen and enjoy the time aboard Commandant Charcot. This ship is essentially a five-star cocoon that travels with you to some of the most remote and amazing places in the world. The ship is the first hybrid-electric luxury polar exploration vessel, where there is so much to enjoy and experience.

Expand your horizons in style. PONANT

The service is five-star luxury, with a French flair, from sumptuous dining options to elegant interior design. You can enjoy a spa or sauna treatment, relax with a book and a cup of coffee in the observatory lounge, or get involved in some of the many activities organized by the cruise director. And of course there are lectures given by the expedition team, as well as regular excursions aboard the zodiac boats.

“The Expedition Team’s expertise ensures guests have a fully immersive experience,” says Erwin-Rose, “with detailed explanations of the environment, whether ashore or on the Zodiacs.”

There are so many highlights to this expedition – although there is nothing quite like that unique, exhilarating moment when you travel to the ends of the earth.

Click here to find out more about Le Commandant Charcot, or call 1300 737 178 (Australia), 0800 767 018 (New Zealand) for more information or to order a brochure.

Cash advance: what is it and should you get one?

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petekarici/Getty Images

Difficult financial situations happen from time to time for most people. When this happens, it’s not always obvious where to turn for help. In these situations, however, a cash advance can be an attractive option because it is faster and easier to obtain than other options.

Depending on the severity of the circumstances, you may not have the time and energy to consider options that take longer and involve more paperwork.

But despite their benefits, cash advances can also come with significant costs. Therefore, it is important to understand what cash advances are and how much they could cost you. It is also important to know the alternatives available to you in case of need.

What is a cash advance?

A cash advance is a short-term loan offered by a bank or other financial institution, often with very high interest and fees. But the trade-off is that they allow borrowers to easily access the funds they need, faster than other types of loans.

When people think of cash advances, they often think of credit card cash advances. It’s one of the most common types of cash advances, but it’s not the only one.

However, the cost of using a cash advance can be high and can lead to an endless cycle of interest accrual. Therefore, it is important to understand how they work and all the parts that are involved.

Types of cash advances

“Cash advance” always refers to a form of borrowing, but there is not just one type of cash advance. There are a few common types, but how each works is different.

Credit card cash advances

Credit card cash advances are the most common type of cash advance and involve borrowing up to a cash advance limit on your account. Note that with this method there is a cash advance limit, and this limit is usually less than your purchase limit. The cash advance limit is usually only a fraction of your credit limit.

Additionally, the APR for credit card cash advances is often several percentage points higher than the APR for purchases and balance transfers. To complicate matters further, there is no grace period for credit card cash advances.

There is a grace period that requires card issuers not to charge interest for at least 21 days after the payment due date. However, cash advances don’t have that luxury and will start earning interest immediately after you receive your money.

Payday loans

Payday loans provide small cash advances to individuals that must be repaid on the borrower’s next payday. These loans generally require proof of income such as a pay stub to show that the borrower is able to repay the loan. However, payday loans can also use other sources of income to cover the balance.

Payday loans are short-term loans, usually for small amounts; it’s not uncommon for a payday loan to be for $100. Nevertheless, their high interest rates can make payday loans a very expensive way to borrow.

For example, the borrower might have to pay a fee of $20 to borrow $100. $20 sounds like a small fee, but as a percentage, it’s 20% of the principle, which is high. But payday loans usually have a repayment period of 14 days. So, if this 20% interest charge is annualized, it equates to over 500% APR.

To make matters worse, some states allow payday loans to be renewed. In this case, any amount that the borrower cannot repay by his next payday can be turned into a new loan. Additionally, there may be interest charges, late fees, and other charges payable. And it’s all on top of our previously mentioned 500% APR.

Cash Advances to Merchants

Merchant cash advances are a way for businesses to get the funds they need. Merchant cash advances use past sales or future sales projections to determine the amount of the advance. This is similar to the pay stub requirement for payday loans. Merchant cash advances are a relatively easy way for small businesses to access the cash they need, as the whole process often only takes a few days.

How does a cash advance work?

When you take out a cash advance, you are borrowing an amount that will be subject to interest and fees associated with the advance. There may be additional charges, such as cash advance fees. Additionally, cash advances such as credit card cash advances often come with a higher APR than other types of transactions.

Depending on the type of cash advance, you may have a few different options for taking out a cash advance.

Try these methods:

  • In line. Your card issuer may allow you to request a cash advance through their website or mobile app, saving you the hassle of having to travel to request an advance.
  • In person. If you have a bank-issued credit card, you can take the card there and ask for a cash advance.
  • At an ATM. You may be able to request a cash advance at your bank’s ATM. However, as with most ATM transactions, you will need a PIN to be able to request a cash advance in this way. If you don’t have a PIN, you can request one; however, your bank may not be able to provide you with one immediately. Therefore, you may have to wait a few days for your PIN.
  • By convenience check. Your bank may offer convenience checks that you can issue or the amount you need as an advance.

Costs and fees

There are a few costs and fees to consider if you’re considering a cash advance. Depending on the terms of the advance, these fees can be significant. Therefore, you should be aware of all the implications before applying for one.

For credit card cash advances, for example, cash advances may have a higher APR than balance transfers and purchases. Then, in addition to the higher APR, you will have to pay a separate cash advance fee.

Cash advance fees are typically 3% to 5% of the cash advance amount. So a $500 cash advance would incur a fee of $15 to $25, on average.

There are also other fees you might encounter. For example, if you request a cash advance at an ATM, fees may apply. It could also be the money if you request a cash advance in a foreign currency, which could incur additional charges.

Cash Advance FAQs

Here are the answers to some of the most frequently asked questions about cash advances.

  • Is a cash advance hurting your credit?
    • Asking for a cash advance will not necessarily hurt your credit. However, it will increase your credit utilization, which could hurt your credit if it pushes your utilization too high. As a general rule, you should try to keep your credit utilization below 30%.
  • What is an example of a cash advance?
    • The most common form of cash advance is a credit card cash advance. With this type, you ask your card issuer to extend a cash advance to be repaid later. For example, you can request a $250 advance from your card issuer. Remember that there will be cash advance fees and most credit cards have a cash advance APR that is higher than the purchase APR.
  • Is an advance a loan?
    • Yes, a cash advance is a loan. Another term for this is a line of credit, which you might see used with your credit card. However, all these terms are just terms used to refer to different types of loans.

Our in-house research team and on-site financial experts work together to create accurate, unbiased and up-to-date content. We check every stat, quote and fact using trusted primary resources to ensure that the information we provide is correct. You can read more about GOBankingRates processes and standards in our Editorial Policy.

About the Author

Bob Haegele is a personal finance writer specializing in topics such as investing, banking, credit cards, and real estate. His work has been featured on The Ladders, The Good Men Project and Small Biz Daily. He also co-runs Modest Money and is a dog sitter and walker.

How to Destroy Icebergs Easily in Dread Hunger

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In order to escape the harsh Arctic environment in Dread Hunger, an iceberg will need to be destroyed in order for the ship to reach open water.

From the start of each game in The terrible hunger, explorers are tasked with moving their ship to the other side of the map and reaching open water by destroying the large iceberg blocking the exit. The Iceberg can be destroyed with Nitroglycerin, but it’s hard to get and even harder to deliver. In order to win in Team Explorer, players will need to work together to deliver the explosives safely while battling various groups of enemies, such as cannibals in The terrible hunger.

Before the explorers can hope to destroy the iceberg and escape the Arctic, they will have to move the ship forward. The only way forward is to continually fill the boiler with coal. Each player, whether an Explorer or a Thrall, starts the match with a Coal, then that resource must be looted from various containers around the map. When there is fuel in the boiler, a player can steer the ship towards the iceberg. As the ship moves, the bar at the top indicates how close the ship is to reaching the other end of the map.

Related: Among Us: How To Work Together As Imposters

Carrying nitroglycerin to an iceberg is arguably the most difficult task to complete in order to survive in The terrible hunger, and that will require more than one explorer. When the Nitroglycerin Crate is picked up, it will take up an inventory slot and add a lot of weight to the player carrying it. Nitroglycerin has a health meter that depletes whenever the player carrying it sprints or when it is on the ground and the crate takes damage. When the health meter is depleted, the Nitroglycerin will emit a hiss signal signaling that it is about to explode.

Tips to Get Nitroglycerin and Destroy an Iceberg in Scary Hunger

How to Destroy Icebergs Easily in Dread Hunger Wearing Nitro

Once the explorers have reached their final obstacle, they will need to collect the Nitroglycerin from the old Expedition Camp. The camp can be reached by following the path up the side of the mountain, but conditions are harsh and there will be several enemies to fight, including packs of wolves, polar bears, and any groups of cannibals called in by the Thralls . After reaching camp, the crew will need to have one person dedicated to delivering the explosives while the others protect them.

As a carrier, the easiest way to The terrible hunger bringing nitroglycerin to the iceberg means running until enemies are spotted, then staying out of the fight until it’s safe to sprint again. Players also have the option to drop Nitroglycerin and join the fight, but it’s not recommended. Dropping the crate will make it vulnerable, and any Thralls in the party can easily set it off, potentially killing multiple explorers. As a Protection Team player, taking out enemies that target the Nitroglycerin Carrier is top priority. Slaves can send cannibals after whoever is carrying the explosives, so any explorer protecting them must stand in the way of enemies and eliminate them before they can reach their target.

Since The terrible hunger is primarily a game of social deduction, it can be difficult to determine who to trust when transporting nitroglycerin. Letting a Thrall pick up the explosives can lead to a catastrophic end for the explorers, but it’s just as dangerous to have one of these impostors on the protection team. Given that the iceberg is at the end of the game, Thralls will likely do whatever it takes to kill the explorers rather than play it safe to conceal their identities. As the match draws to a close, players must carefully determine who will carry the Nitroglycerin and who will help deliver it.

As a last resort, players can ram the iceberg with the ship, but whether or not it breaks depends on how hard it is hit and its health. At full health, the iceberg will need to be rammed several times, but this can quickly create too many holes in the ship that will need to be repaired quickly to avoid sinking. Gunpowder also does minimal damage to the iceberg. Although there are other methods, the most reliable way to destroy the iceberg by The terrible hunger is to carry a crate of nitroglycerin and blow it up.

Next: Elden Ring: How to Install the Ascended Mod (and What It Does)

The terrible hunger is available for PC.

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The North and South poles are melting. It’s time to take it seriously

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NOTnothing on earth compares to the icy sweeps of the planet’s polar extremes. That is why, perhaps, explorers and scientists who have been there often seek more distant analogies, describing the austere expanses of frozen terrain of the poles in lunar, supernatural terms with their reduced palettes of white, black and icy blue. Home to only the best-adapted organisms, the Arctic and Antarctica are largely lethal to mankind, unforgiving with their dark winters, harsh winds and bitter cold. Yet these remote and inhospitable places impact our lives more than almost anything close to home. The poles regulate our climate, our weather and even our maritime food supply. And they are warming faster than anywhere else on earth, with untold consequences for those who live in the planet’s most accommodating latitudes.

I saw it with my own eyes on February 6, 2020, when Antarctica recorded its hottest temperature on record – 18.3°C (64.9°F) – at the Esperanza weather station in Argentina . I was on nearby Anvers Island, accompanying a team of ornithologists from Stony Brook University in New York conducting a census of the region’s chinstrap penguin population. Expedition members enjoyed the mild weather, stripping down to T-shirts, but it was an ominous sign for the species they were there to document.

Photography by Acacia Johnson

Penguins aren’t just adorable icons of Antarctica. It is a sentinel species, an animal whose behaviors can tell scientists if something is wrong in a particular environment. Chinstraps feed primarily on krill, tiny crustaceans that are the base of the marine food chain. Almost every animal in the ocean eats krill or something else that eats krill, right down to the tuna that ends up on our tables. Krill feed on algae and phytoplankton that cling to the underside of ocean ice. As global temperatures rise due to rising carbon emissions, sea ice is shrinking. It would be impossible to investigate the health of the world’s krill populations, but if the chinstraps aren’t doing well, it’s likely that krill and anything that eats krill aren’t doing well either. And our carbon canaries are not doing well. The Stony Brook researchers found that most chinstrap colonies had declined over the past 50 years, some by half and others by as much as 77%.

Read more: Climate change is decimating Antarctic chinstrap penguins

We can wring our hands at the impending loss of a charismatic species, but “Save the Penguins: Use Solar Power” doesn’t go far enough as a slogan. It does not fully encompass what the loss of this penguin species portends for the future of humanity on this planet. Climate change moves so slowly that it seems almost imperceptible to us – what difference, after all, does a fraction of a degree make in our everyday lives? – but place that trajectory on something more fragile and less resilient like chinstraps, and it quickly becomes clear that the domino effect of climate change is already beginning to reach uncomfortably close to home.

Or at least it should. There is an incomprehensible disconnect between what climate science says needs to be done – an immediate change in the way we generate energy, travel and eat – and what we and our leaders are prepared to do. When does the distant threat of ecological collapse take on the fierce urgency of the present? When the sea ice will have completely disappeared? When are the penguins?

It will then be too late.

Baker in the port of Orne, Antarctica, on February 7, 2020.

Courtesy picture

The Arctic is approaching this tipping point. Nearly five months after Antarctica’s record high temperature, the Siberian city of Verkhoyansk hit an all-time high of 38°C (100.4°F) on June 20, 2020, heralding a summer of extreme heat and wildfires in an area best known for ice storms. Overall, 2020 was the warmest year on record for both poles, and both the Arctic and Antarctica saw precipitous sea ice declines. When there is not enough ice to reflect the sun’s rays back into space, this heat is absorbed by the dark ocean, accelerating the rise in water temperatures and the melting of the ice, changing the currents ocean waves, weakening the jet stream and altering wind patterns. The effects ripple through the global ecosystem, manifesting in greater drought, heat, flooding and storms. “What happens in the Arctic doesn’t stay in the Arctic,” Admiral Karl L. Schultz, commander of the U.S. Coast Guard, told me during a September 2021 visit to the forward- Canadian arctic post at Resolute. Hurricane Ida had just passed through the Caribbean and parts of the United States, killing 107 people from Venezuela to Connecticut and costing more than $75 billion in damage. While Resolute seemed worlds away from the destruction left in Ida’s wake, the two were opposite sides of the same coin, Schultz said. Ida was a tropical storm that exploded into a hurricane without warning – the kind of rapid intensification caused by the warming Arctic, and a harbinger of more to come.

Read more: Why the warming Arctic has the US Coast Guard worried about the rest of the country

What happens on top of the planet matters to everyone on earth. But it matters most to those who live there. A lack of sea ice exposes vulnerable shorelines to rapid erosion, forcing indigenous villages that have lived in harmony with the extremes of the Arctic for centuries to move inland. Seal, walrus and polar bear hunting – a mainstay of Arctic indigenous traditions and subsistence survival – is not possible without the thick patches of winter ice. For many communities on the fringes, the loss of sea ice means cultural disruption as well as dislocation in insight into what global warming, if left unchecked, will ultimately bring to the rest of the world.

A few weeks after leaving Resolute, I traveled to the village of Unalakleet on the northwest coast of Alaska to meet Laureli Ivanoff, an Inupiaq climate activist. The freezer in Ivanoff’s house was overflowing with the bounty of Arctic Alaska’s short summer season: tundra berries and greens, wild rhubarb, salmon caviar, caribou fat, and bear meat. The only thing she doesn’t have is the food that has sustained her culture for generations: ugruk, or bearded seal. When a seal is harvested, every part of the animal is used, from fat to skin and intestines. It anchors the hunter in a community ritual of sharing and respect for nature. When Ivanoff was a child, the ice formed in early fall and stayed until spring. Today, she wonders if she will see ice in the years to come.

“Colonization and assimilation took away so much,” Ivanoff told me, including the language, dance, and ceremonies that unite the community. Only indigenous food traditions remain. “And now climate change is taking even that.” She watched her 3-year-old son play on the floor as he took a toy boat on an imaginary ugruk hunt. “How much of his culture will he be able to retain? »

A fundamental part of human nature is to want to pass on to the next generation something that symbolizes our values, whether it is a cultural tradition or material possessions acquired during a lifetime of work. If my daughter inherits a damaged planet, shaken by heat waves, fouled by a tide of plastic and witnessing waves of climate migrants fleeing uninhabitable lands, what does that say about the values ​​my generation has cultivated in its relentless pursuit of perpetual growth? The science is clear: to avoid climate devastation, we need to nearly halve greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 from 2010 levels. This means real sacrifices in the short term, especially for those of us who are fortunate enough to live in highly developed areas of the world. At this point, prioritizing climate offers a stronger guarantee for the future than continuing to accumulate wealth as we have.

Read more: Polar paradox: Arctic melting could destroy native ways of life while enriching some Alaskans

I came out of both poles with a growing sense of frustration with an overall reluctance to act in the face of a certain fate, as well as fear. A warming Arctic is not just a warning. It has the potential to take us with it in its demise. Permafrost, the layer of permanently frozen ground that underlies both poles, is a carbon bomb ready to explode. When the ground thaws, it releases greenhouse gases, further warming the region and setting off a perpetual feedback loop. Scientists don’t yet know if Arctic emissions are comparable to those of a small developing country or, more likely, another China. (The South Pole’s permafrost is trapped under the Antarctic Ice Sheet. If that melts, we have bigger problems to worry about, like a sea level rise of 200 feet).

We tend to think of Earth’s polar regions as the victims of our own carbon binge. But if we push them beyond the tipping point, they will become authors. Our polar regions protect life as we know it only to the extent that we protect them. It’s worth sacrificing a little more to make sure we leave behind a better world.

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LIFF 2022’s competitive documentaries, a magnificent mix

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LEAP OF FAITH: ‘On the Edge’ by Israeli filmmaker Rina Papish documents the incredible story of champion skydiver Avner Zehori, who was paralyzed in a base jump accident. (Photo provided)

The 14th annual Lighthouse International Film Festival is just around the corner, kicking off June 2 and running through June 5.

It will screen all kinds of films during its run, including opening night and yet-unannounced closing features, landmark films and surf films, as well as panel discussions, networking events and parties. . Yet, the highlight of almost every film festival is its competitive categories of which LIFF has plenty – dramatic features, shorts, episodes, high school films and, of course, documentaries.

LIFF has announced the eight representatives of the latter who will compete for top honors at this year’s festival. They are certainly international. Admittedly, four are American entries. But the others come from the UK, Canada, Austria and Israel. And they cover a very wide variety of topics.

Here they are in alphabetical order:

“Eternal Spring,” directed by Jason Loftus, is an 85-minute Canadian film that chronicles an incident in China in March 2002. Members of a banned spiritual group, Falun Gong, hacked into a state television signal to counter the government’s rhetoric about their practices. Loftus combines current imagery with 3D animation created by exiled Chinese comic artist Daxiong, who now lives in New York, to retrace the event on its 20th anniversary.

The film’s publicist said it “brings to life a story of unprecedented defiance, harrowing accounts of persecution, and an uplifting story of determination to defend political and religious freedoms, whatever the cost” . However, it will be interesting to see if the Falun Gong media organization, The old timeswill be mentioned given that he has promoted conspiracy theories, anti-vaccine misinformation, and far-right political groups in Europe and the United States

“Exposure”, an 88-minute American film directed by Holly Morris, follows the adventures of a Muslim chaplain, a French biologist, a Qatari princess and eight other women from the Arab and Western world as they attempt to ski through the melting ice of the Arctic Ocean to reach the North Pole. Led by veteran polar explorer Felicity Aston, they deal with frostbite, polar bear threats, sexism and self-doubt in an intimate story of resilience, survival and global citizenship.

“Finite: The Climate of Change,” is the UK entry, making its US premiere. Director Rich Felgate’s 98-minute documentary follows worried German citizens as they step forward to save an ancient forest from the spread of one of Europe’s biggest coal mines. They form an unlikely alliance with a frustrated community in rural North East England where residents are forced into action to protect their own homes from a new mine.

Another film is making its American debut at LIFF, this one from Austria. Director Philipp Fussenegger’s 80-minute “I am the Tigress” is an observation-style documentary that aims to visually capture the internal and external journey of Tischa “The Tigress” Thomas during the final year of her bodybuilding career. The film shows her going from one stage to the next as a dominatrix, bodybuilder, grandma, and girlfriend! As the ad copy says, “Tigress prowls extremes.”

American director Austin Spiers captured, of all things, the very brief annual bloom of a special purple tree in his two-hour “Jacaranada,” which at first glance doesn’t seem like very interesting material. But here’s the thing – Spiers also featured three different people’s experiences in the summer of 2020 and the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic. In other words, the director captured two “flowers”, one beautiful, the other horrible, at once. Now there is a juxtaposition.

“Luminous” is a 95-minute American film directed by Sam Smartt. It premiered on the East Coast at LIFF and had been in production since 2014. Why so long? Because it took astronomer Larry Molnar and his team of students five years to test an unprecedented prediction after they stumbled upon a strange star. Hmm, have you ever heard of Molnar or his hypothesis? And could most laymen understand Molnar’s quest? It’s hard to explain the deep weeds of astronomy and if Smartt was able to do that, it might make observing interesting. It helps that Molnar’s prediction was unbelievable, in that he said the star would explode, meaning his theory would die out with either a boom or a collapse.

Russia is still in the news today thanks to Vladimir Putin’s efforts to recreate the USSR. “Oleg”, directed by Nadia Tass, is therefore timely, even if it is about events that took place in 1985. The 97-minute documentary tells the life story of Oleg Vidov, one of most famous movie stars of the Soviet Union. Despite his fame, he was unwilling to live under the oppressive totalitarian Soviet state and in 1985 he planned a daring escape to freedom in the west. It’s likely most viewers wouldn’t be interested in the story of an actor they probably don’t know, although after his defection he starred in films with Arnold Schwarzenegger, Mickey Rourke and Kevin Costner . But, as they say, timing is everything.

“On The Edge”, directed by Israeli filmmaker Rina Papish, is by far the shortest of the documentaries in the competition, at just 54 minutes. This is the extraordinary story of Avner Zehori, who was a champion skydiver and base jumper until, at the age of 28, he crash-landed while jumping from a bridge in California and was paralyzed. “Through touching encounters and rare photographs, the discrepancy between his life before and after the accident is revealed,” says the film’s press officer.

Variety, your name is the Lighthouse International Film Festival.

Rick Mellerup

Mars’ carbon dioxide glaciers are on the move

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In 1666, the famous Italian astronomer and mathematician Giovanni Cassini (the man who discovered four of Saturn’s largest moons) observed the Martian polar caps for the first time. However, it was not until the late 18th century, when Sir William Herschel recorded his own observations, that the connection to Earth’s own ice sheets was made. In his later treatise,On the remarkable apparitions in the polar regions of the planet Mars(1784), noted how the south cap grew and shrunk due to seasonal changes.

With the development of modern telescopes and robotic explorers, scientists have learned much more about these polar deposits. In 2011, they learned that unlike the northernmost ice sheet, the southern ice sheet is largely made up of frozen carbon dioxide (aka “dry ice”). According to new research by the Institute of Planetary Sciences (PSI), glaciers of carbon dioxide ice have been move and sculpt functions in the southern polar region for over 600,000 years – and are on the move right now!

The research team was led by isaac smithformer PSI researcher and Assistant Professor of Earth and Space Sciences at York University in Toronto (where he also holds a Canada Research Chair in planetary sciences). He was joined by geologists, glaciologists and engineers from PSI, York University, Institute of Low Temperature Sciences and arctic research center at Hokkaido University in Japan and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).

Ice at the south pole of Mars. Credit: ESA/DLR/FU Berlin/Bill Dunford

The presence of carbon dioxide glaciers in the south polar region of Mars has been first confirmed in 2011 by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Along with data obtained by ESA’s Mars Express, the scientists noted that they flowed much like water-ice glaciers do here on Earth, based on the surface features they carved in their wake. As Smith described in a recent PSI Press release:

“About 600,000 years ago, CO2 ice has begun to form at the Martian south pole. Due to climatic cycles, the ice increased several times in volume and mass, interrupted by periods of loss of mass by sublimation. If the ice had never sunk, it would mostly be where it was originally deposited, and the thickest ice would only be about 45 meters thick. Instead, because it flowed downward into spiral basins and troughs – curvilinear basins – where it accumulated, it was able to form deposits up to a kilometer thick.

These observations also showed that the part of the ice sheet composed of water ice appears to be stationary, remaining at high altitude. In previous research, to which Smith helped contribute while still at PSI, scientists studied the resistance properties (i.e. flow laws) of carbon dioxide glaciers to determine why this was happening. Their results indicated that in the kinds of conditions that exist around the southern polar region, carbon dioxide ice flows were almost 100 times faster than water ice glaciers.

For this, they concluded that CO2 ice behaves like glaciers here on Earth, which makes the slow-moving ice sheet appear stationary. “Glaciers have enough mass that if sublimated they would double the atmospheric pressure of the planet,” Smith added, quoting a 2018 article by Than Putzig, senior scientist at PSI and co-author of this article. “The longest glacier is about 200 kilometers long and about 40 kilometers wide. These are great!”

The South Pole on Mars.  Picture: NASA.
Artist’s impression of the ice sheet around the South Pole on Mars. Credit: NASA.

For this study, Smith and his colleagues relied on NASA Ice sheet and sea level system model (ISSM) to model the movements of the glacier. Once adapted to conditions on the surface of Mars and with CO2, they found that typical methods did not displace carbon dioxide glaciers. They found that while activity continues, flows peaked about 400,000 years ago, when deposition was at its peak. Since their ice mass is currently shrinking, Smith said, glacier flow is currently in a “slow period”:

“Atmospheric deposition would place the ice in a pattern that we don’t see. It would be much more evenly distributed and thinner. What the glacier interpretation provides is a mechanism to move ice from high places to lower basins which are also at lower levels. [latitudes].

“If atmospheric deposition were the only process acting on the ice, then most of it would be at the highest latitude and highest altitude. This is simply not the case. Ice flows down into ponds, much like water flows down into lakes. Only glacial flow can explain the distribution we found in 2018.”

This work is bolstered by additional research by Smith and his team, which identified several surface features that are very good analogues for features seen on terrestrial glaciers. These include topographic profiles, crevices and compression ridges, which provided a basis for comparison with their adapted ISSM models. These findings could also inform future planetary investigations and point to more “Earth-like” glacial activity.

The southern polar cap of Mars, seen in April 2000 by Mars Odyssey. Credit: NASA/JPL/MSSS

To date, Earth, Mars, and Pluto are the only bodies in the solar system known to have actively flowing ice, ranging from water ice to CO2 with frozen nitrogen. But there are many other icy bodies in the solar system, including the larger satellites orbiting Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, and the growing number of smaller planets discovered in the Kuiper Belt. Many of these same bodies experience regular exchanges between their interiors and their surfaces (endogenous resurfacing, cryovolcanism, etc.).

Many of these bodies will likely have their own glaciers composed of substances like carbon monoxide, ammonia and methane, which could behave in even more exotic ways! In the years to come, scientists will be able to test these theories with missions like the European Clipper and the Enceladus Orbiter, which will explore two major satellites that have interior oceans and may even harbor life. The dynamics of their icy surfaces could provide further evidence for the formation and evolution of these moons.

The article describing their findings recently appeared in the journal JGR Planets, a publication overseen by the American Geological Union (AGU).

Further reading: psi

Employee compensation options, short and long term

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In 2021, employee retention has become a trending topic. The company feared labor shortages and the media covered the so-called “Big Resignation”.

However, in the second quarter of 2022, inflation drove down stock prices and forced some companies to lay off state-owned or venture capital-backed companies. The demand for labor may have weakened slightly.

Regardless of the ebb and flow of the economic tides, companies must consider how employee compensation enriches both company shareholders and the employees themselves.

Compensation Factors

Focusing on monetary compensation or compensation, excluding perks and benefits, it could be argued that there are three essential factors or considerations.

  • Is the compensation appreciated in the short term or in the long term?
  • Is compensation guaranteed or performance-based?
  • Can the employee access the compensation value?

A few examples will help clarify these factors.

Salary or salary

Remuneration may take the form of an hourly wage or a negotiated annual salary paid in regular installments after the work is completed.

This form of employee compensation is both guaranteed and short-term.

The employee expects a paycheck to arrive on a designated date. And the interval between payments is usually only a week or two.

Short-term guaranteed payouts provide employees with ground-level financial stability. They have predictable income to help guide their financial decisions.

Performance based

There are also short-term, but performance-based forms of employee compensation. Perhaps the most common are commissions paid to salespeople, profit-sharing proceeds distributed among workers, and bonuses for exceptional work and merit.

These employee payments can be added to a regular paycheck or split quarterly or annually. This form of compensation can be considered short-term and performance-based.

These payments give workers a goal to achieve and help the company rally them around set goals.

401(k) Correspondence

Company pension plans are most beneficial to employees when the company matches the worker’s contribution.

So if someone decides to save 7% of each paycheck and put it — pre-tax — into a 401(k) plan, the employer adds 7% in matching, doubling the investment.

A good 401(k) match begins on the first day of work and is both fully guaranteed and long-term. The employee can depend on the match but will not benefit from it until retirement.

A 401(k) matching plan ensures that employees can look forward to retirement and be sure they will have funds available when they are no longer working. These programs can also contribute to better employee retention.

pensions

The Hearst Corporation, a large media company, is known for having a well-funded and effective employee retirement plan that began in 1967.

In the case of the Hearst pension, employees will receive a regular payment after retirement prorated to their peak salary and time spent with the company.

Like 401(k) plans, pension plans offer guaranteed long-term compensation.

This form of compensation may not be as popular with relatively new companies, but many companies still use it, especially with unionized workers.

Equity

When employees share ownership of a business, they receive long-term, performance-based compensation.

Equity is the value an owner (shareholder) would receive if a business were sold and its debts paid off.

The long-term nature of equity means that the business (or part of it) is sold before the employee can enjoy its value.

Equity is performance-based because the business must thrive, or at least survive, before it sells.

Finally, equity is a favorite of employees because in some companies it can make employees quite wealthy. Imagine receiving equity from Amazon at the start.

Combine compensation types

When a company develops its employee compensation plan, it may be good to include at least four types of compensation.

  • Short term and guaranteed,
  • Short-term and performance-based,
  • Long lasting and guaranteed,
  • Long term and performance based.

A company might consider four types of compensation.

When a company offers this type of compensation, it helps its workers find financial security now and in the years to come.

Availablity

A final consideration is an employee’s ability to access value when needed.

Here are two more examples that will help explain the benefit of making money available to workers.

Access salaries now

For the first example, consider a new employee at a retail store. Paid by the hour, this individual could be among the most financially vulnerable workers in a company.

A report by LendingClub and PYMNTS estimated that 67% of American workers were living paycheck to paycheck in January 2022. If that were the case for the retailer described above, something so common that a minor car problem could be an emergency.

Too often, that employee will have to turn to an almost usurious payday loan to survive, paying annual interest rates as high as 499% in some places.

This one-time loan can impact employee attendance and performance as the worker turns to a second job or gigs like Doordash or Uber to cover interest.

Some companies help solve this problem by making part of a worker’s salary available on demand.

For example, the retail worker described above might be able to access something like 70% of her daily wage one hour after the end of a shift.

In this case, availability could help a vulnerable employee avoid high-interest loans.

Access equity

Hourly workers aren’t the only ones living paycheck to paycheck. The same LendingClub and PYMNTS report estimated that 48% of workers who earned more than $100,000 a year were living paycheck to paycheck in January 2022.

According to the report, these employees would not be able to cover an emergency of just $400.

This report implies that many salaried and highly paid workers have either high debt or high expenses, which they could mitigate with the value stored in equity.

To this end, some companies allow employees to sell their vested options. These sales can take the form of a direct purchase from the company or a secondary sale.

For example, AngelList Venture offers a liquidity product called Transfers that effectively allows shareholders to sell shares. A company could schedule this type of sale every 24 months, allowing invested employees to access their equity value to pay off debt or buy a home.

Companies that care about employees will develop compensation plans that ultimately lead to financial security.

The Bondi institution’s Icebergs dining room and bar is closing until September for refurbishment

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The Bondi institution Icebergs Dining Room and Bar has closed its doors until September. The clifftop Italian restaurant of legendary restaurateur Maurice Terzini had its last service on Sunday, May 8, before closing to undergo extensive renovations over the winter.

The renovation will be undertaken in conjunction with Roman architectural firm Lazzarini Pickering, who oversaw the original design of Icebergs – whose sleek palette matches the ocean views beyond the windows – two years ago. decades. Not only will the public spaces be upgraded, but, according to an Instagram post by head chef Alex Prichard, the 20-year-old kitchen will also get a zhoosh.

Icebergs Dining Room and Bar opened in 2002 under Terzini, who had made a name for himself with new wave Italian restaurants in Melbourne before moving to Sydney and opening Otto of Woolloomooloo, which he sold before opening Icebergs. Since then, the restaurant and bar has become a mainstay of Sydney’s foodie scene, attracting locals and international visitors alike to its remarkable dining room, built into the Bondi Cliffs above the Icebergs Pool. Terzini continued to make his mark on the city’s culinary, fashion and art scenes, launching popular restaurants such as Cicciabella, litter-free bar Re and clothing line Ten Pieces.

“I was [lucky] enough to have taken the first meal on December 14, 2002… and last night a very emotional last meal from the engine room [at Icebergs Dining Room and Bar] …see you all of September,” Terzini posted on Instagram about the shutdown.

The Icebergs dining room and bar are now closed and are expected to reopen in September 2022.

idrb.com

Climate limit of 1.5°C is about to be exceeded, warn scientists | Climate crisis

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The year in which the world will first cross the 1.5°C global heating limit set by international governments is fast approaching, according to a new forecast.

The chance of one of the next five years exceeding the limit is now 50%, scientists led by the UK Met Office have found. As late as 2015, there was no way that would happen in the next five years. But that jumped to 20% in 2020 and 40% in 2021. The global average temperature was 1.1°C above pre-industrial levels in 2021.

There is also almost certainty – 93% – that by 2026 a year will be the warmest on record, beating 2016, when a natural El Niño weather event supercharged temperatures. It is also almost certain that the average temperature for the next five years will be higher than that of the past five years, as the climate crisis intensifies.

“The 1.5°C figure is not a random statistic. Rather, it is an indicator of the point at which climate impacts will become increasingly harmful to people and even to the entire planet,” said Professor Petteri Taalas, head of the World Meteorological Organization, which published the new report. .

“As long as we continue to emit greenhouse gases, temperatures will continue to rise,” Taalas said. “As well, our oceans will continue to warm and acidify, sea ice and glaciers will continue to melt, sea levels will continue to rise, and our climate will become more extreme.”

Natural weather cycles can cause global temperatures to rise or fall. But the Paris Agreement obliges nations to keep the underlying, human-driven rise well below 2C, as well as to continue efforts to limit the rise to 1.5C. Scientists around the world warned in 2018 that 1.5°C of global warming would have serious consequences for billions of people.

“A single year of overshoot above 1.5°C does not mean that we have crossed the emblematic threshold of the Paris Agreement, but it does reveal that we are getting closer and closer to a situation where 1, 5°C could be exceeded for an extended period,” Dr Leon Hermanson told the Met Office.

“The possibility of exceeding the 1.5C threshold, even for just a year, is worrying,” said Dr Andrew King, from the University of Melbourne. “Our greenhouse gas emissions are still at near record highs and until we get our emissions down to zero we will continue to see global warming. Rapid and drastic cuts in emissions are urgently needed. .

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“To really go beyond the [Paris] goal, we should be above 1.5C even in a ‘normal’ year” unaffected by natural climate variations, said Professor Steven Sherwood of the University of New South Wales. “But the report reminds us that we are getting uncomfortably close to that goal.”

The annual forecast leverages the best forecasting systems from climate centers around the world to produce practical information for decision makers. It found a higher probability of rain in 2022 compared to the past 30-year average in northern Europe, the Sahel, northeast Brazil and Australia, while drier conditions than d habit are predicted for southwestern Europe and southwestern North America. .

Professor Taalas also warned of particularly rapid warming at the North Pole: “Arctic warming is disproportionately high and what happens in the Arctic affects us all. Shrinking sea ice and its repercussions have been linked to extreme weather events in Europe, North America and Asia, including heat waves, floods and even snowstorms.

Forecasts indicate that the temperature increase in the Arctic will be three times higher than the global average over the next five years.

The world’s first icebreaker cruise is sailing to the North Pole this summer

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Ever wanted to visit the vast, endless cold of the North Pole, but don’t feel like hiking through freezing wilderness, potentially getting severe frostbite, and, uh, dying? Well, there will soon be a much more comfortable and less life-threatening alternative. The world’s first icebreaker cruise ship is set to sail to the Arctic Circle this summer.

The ship is called Le Commandant Charcot and is operated by the French cruise line Ponant. Running on a special hybrid engine that uses liquefied natural gas and apparently has minimal impact on the environment, the Charcot has the capacity to take up to 270 guests across the ice to the North Pole.

The Charcot is not only the first icebreaker cruise of its kind: it is also a really very luxurious liner. On board are chic designer suites, several lounges, an observation deck, a theatre, shops, a spa, a pool deck (with indoor and outdoor pools) and two restaurants, one of which is run by Alain Ducasse – a chef best known for winning 21 Michelin stars.

If all that wasn’t enough, Le Charcot also offers plenty of off-boat experiences, from snow hiking and kayaking to exploring by dog ​​sled and helicopter. The crew apparently includes one naturalist guide for every ten passengers, all to help guests navigate fjords and icebergs – and maybe even spot the odd polar bear. Here are some additional shots of the ship.

Photography: Ponant / Gilles Trillard

Commander Charcot
Photography: Ponant / Gilles Trillard

Commander Charcot
Photography: Ponant / Olivier Blaud

In addition to offering the possibility of visiting the far north, the Charcot also has a research wing with two on-board laboratories. In collaboration with the Polar Citizen Science Collective, Charcot’s team provides feedback on the Arctic environment and helps supply research centers.

As for whether icebreakers are bad for the environment…well, ice melts faster when broken. Thus, if used on a large scale, icebreaker ships could pose a serious problem by accelerating the melting of the ice caps. The Charcot, as a single ship, is unlikely to make much of a difference. But let’s hope the idea doesn’t pass also popular.

The cheapest cruise starts at £11,600 ($14,800) for a ten-night voyage, but more luxurious packages cost over £30,000 ($38,000). Cruises depart from either Reykjavik, Iceland, or Longyearbyen, Norway, with the price of the latter often including a flight from Paris to the frozen island of Svalbard.

Avid explorers, here is your chance to join the handful of people who have visited the North Pole. And if polar bears aren’t your thing, fear not. Later this year, the Charcot will also make trips to Antarctica.

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Is there a way to prevent or weaken hurricanes? | John Lindsey | John Lindsey

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Atmospheric scientists from Colorado State University, Florida State University and hurricane experts from AccuWeather say the 2022 season could be very similar to last year – the third most active hurricane season. never recorded. In other words, most long-range models agree that 2022 will see a busy hurricane season, and that’s one of the reasons why.

La Niña, the cooling of the eastern equatorial Pacific, is expected to strengthen during this year and possibly in the first part of 2023. La Niña generally tends to drive the storm’s path (jet stream) well into north of where hurricanes often form and intensify in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean. This condition reduces the amount of wind shear in the middle and upper troposphere, allowing these tropical cyclones to thrive if sea surface temperatures are warm enough.

El Niño generally reduces hurricane activity in the Atlantic Basin. As the jet stream moves south, it creates wind shear in the upper atmosphere, disrupting the formation of hurricanes.

Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 to November 30 each year, peaking on or around September 10. Hurricane season in the Eastern Pacific lasts a bit longer, from May 15 to November 30.

Seawater temperatures must be at least 80 degrees Fahrenheit (26.7 Celsius) or higher for these storms to strengthen. This is why it is rare for tropical cyclones to reach the California coast. Nevertheless, it happens. In 1939, a tropical storm hit Long Beach with high winds and torrential rain; Mount Wilson reported 11.6 inches of rain in 24 hours. Forty-five people in the Los Angeles area drowned in the resulting flooding, and high seas and winds carried 48 souls out to sea.

Once one of these storms reaches a sustained wind speed of 74 mph or more, it is classified as a hurricane, typhoon, or cyclone. The only difference between a cyclone, hurricane or typhoon is where the storm forms.

The term “hurricane” is used in the Atlantic and Northeast Pacific. In the Pacific Northwest, this is called a “typhoon” and “cyclones” occur in the South Pacific and the Indian Ocean.

The first person to name tropical cyclones was Clement Lindley Wragge of Queensland, Australia in the late 1800s. Wragge had a bad temper and he took to naming cyclones after politicians he disliked . A forecaster might publicly describe a storm named after a politician as “roaming the Pacific aimlessly or aimlessly.”

This brings us to the question: Is there a way to prevent the genesis of a hurricane? Or, if one develops, is there a way to change its course or weaken it?

At this point, it is more cost effective to move homes and businesses to areas that are not highly vulnerable to such storms and sea level rise due to climate change, but that may change.

You see, scientists and engineers have been working on technologies to reduce the threat over the years.

The US government program called Stormfury attempted to weaken hurricanes using cloud seeding with aircraft-mounted silver iodide flares, but it had very little success and has since been abandoned.

Another idea was to cover the ocean with a Jell-O-like substance or gigantic-sized rolls of plastic wrap to reduce evaporation from the ocean surface.

One suggestion was to use wave energy to drive pumps on surface barges or ships that would bring cold water from the depths of the ocean to the surface in hopes of lowering surface temperatures by seas below 80 degrees in the hurricane’s path to sap its strength.

Another idea along these lines was to tow arctic icebergs in the path of a cyclone.

A Norwegian company called OceanTherm, led by retired Norwegian submariner Olav Hollingsaeter, recently came up with an intriguing method to reduce the strength of hurricanes, eliminate them, or prevent them from forming.

The devastating damage caused by Hurricane Katrina in 2005 motivated Olav to develop the idea of ​​OceanTherm. He and his team came up with the innovative idea of ​​creating an artificial water lift using bubble curtains.

Upwelling occurs naturally along the California coast, generated by northwesterly winds. Relentless gales this spring have sent seawater temperatures plummeting by up to 40 degrees as cold, clear and nutrient-rich water rises to the surface along the immediate coastline.

A bubble curtain is a perforated pipe lowered into the water. The pipe is placed over an expanse of ocean, such as a narrow straight line, and works by delivering bubbles of compressed air to the depths. As the bubbles rise, they carry cold deep water with them to the surface of the ocean.

Currently they are running a pilot project in Norway, and the results are encouraging.

At 50 meters (164 feet) below the sea surface, they were able to lift the cooler water and reduce the sea surface temperature to 0.5 degrees Celsius or 0.8 degrees Fahrenheit above the water temperature at bubble curtain depth.

Going forward, they want to test bubble curtains at 150 meters (492 ft) and 200 meters (656 ft), which would place the bubble curtain well below the average thermocline between 250 and 350 ft in the major part of the Atlantic basin. This seawater at such depths is cold enough to kill the hurricane’s heat engine.

John Lindsey is Pacific Gas and Electric Co.’s Diablo Canyon Power Plant marine meteorologist and media relations representative. Email him at [email protected] or follow him on Twitter @PGE_John.

The Cold Truth Told Warmly: Stories from Antarctica

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COEUR d’ALENE — David Grann admits it — he hates the cold.

“I enjoy reading these stories, preferably near the warm comfort of a fire,” the bestselling author and award-winning journalist said as he opened his speech Friday night.

This aversion to freezing temperatures hasn’t stopped him from immersing himself in the harrowing, heroic, and heartbreaking stories he uncovered while researching his non-fiction book, “The White Darkness: A Journey across Antarctica.” .

He was drawn to this subject not only because it was one of the greatest feats of endurance with a family love story at the center, he said, “but it’s also a story of leadership and the choices we make”.

“I think something, which is central to our humanities theme, teaches us something about the human condition,” Grann said.

Grann was the keynote speaker at the 17th Annual Northern Idaho Distinguished Humanities Conference at the Coeur d’Alene Resort. Humanities Council of Idaho executive director David Pettyjohn said Grann was booked for 2020, but his appearance was postponed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We knew his stories and his ability to tell those stories would be of great interest to the citizens of northern Idaho,” Pettyjohn said. “David is a non-fiction writer. He shows how stranger than fiction and how very interesting truth can be. He’s an incredibly talented speaker. He connects in so many ways; he brings the story as few authors can.”

Grann shared bits of the true story of British explorer Henry Worsley, a man determined to cross Antarctica on a lonely, unaided quest. Worsley embarked on this journey hoping to achieve what his hero, Ernest Shackleton, had failed to do 100 years earlier. Prior to the solo mission, Worsley led an expedition and found the hut that Shackleton and his party had built and inhabited before heading to the South Pole in 1908.

“Shackleton had called the refuge ‘the Mecca of all our hopes and dreams,'” Grann wrote in a passage in his book.

He said that like a general developing a plan of attack, Worsley studied Antarctica and plotted routes for the expedition.

“The more he studied it, the more off-limits this place seemed to him,” Grann said. “The continent – and I really wasn’t aware of this before I started researching this story – it’s almost 5.5 million square miles, it’s bigger than Europe and it’s double size in winter when coastal areas freeze.About 98% of Antarctica is covered by an ice cap.Antarctica is classified as a desert because there is so little precipitation and nothing lives there. “

As Grann recounted Worsley and his unfortunate adventure, he spoke with compassion and amazement, with a feeling that only writers know when they follow the trail of information and feel a closeness to their subjects.

“One of Shackleton’s real lessons was that in failure there can be triumph and there are always elements of our lives, probably Antarctica more than anything else, that are not conquerable,” Grann said. “In that failure, when you have that triumph, you recognize that one of those triumphs is the triumph of life itself.”

Worsley died shortly after returning from the single-player mission, which he was unable to complete. Grann said Worsley and his family would want his lifelong spirit remembered and his life investigated.

“It’s a tragic story, a very sad story,” Grann said. “But I think we all face in some ways those times on our own terms, in our own lives, where we have to come to terms with our own limitations and the questions we ask and the leadership decisions we make.”

Game Leather and Skin Products Market Size and Forecast

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New Jersey, United States – Comprehensive analyzes of the fastest growing companies Game Leather and Skin Products Market provide information that helps stakeholders identify opportunities and challenges. Markets in 2022 could be another big year for game leather and skin products. This report provides an overview of the company’s activities and financial situation (a company profile is required if you want to raise capital or attract investors), recent developments (mergers and acquisitions) and recent SWOT analyses. This report focuses on the Game Hide & Skin Products market over the assessment period 2029. The report also provides an analysis of the Game Hide & Skin Products market growth which includes the Five Factor Analysis Porter’s and supply chain analysis.

It describes the behavior of the industry. It also outlines a future direction that will help companies and other stakeholders make informed decisions that will ensure strong returns for years to come. The report provides a practical overview of the global market and its changing environment to help readers make informed decisions about market projects. This report focuses on growth opportunities that allow the market to expand its operations in existing markets.

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The report helps both major players and new entrants to analyze the market in depth. This helps key players determine their business strategy and set goals. The report provides key market insights including niche growth opportunities along with market size, growth rate and forecast in key regions and countries.

The Game hide & skin products report contains data based on rigorous studies in primary and secondary schools using the best research practices. The report contains exhaustive information which will enable you to evaluate each segment of the Leather and Game Skin Products market. This report has been prepared considering various aspects of market research and analysis. It includes market size estimates, market dynamics, and company and market best practices. Entry marketing strategy, positioning, segmentation, competitive landscape and economic forecasts. Industry-specific technology solutions, roadmap analysis, alignment to key buying criteria, in-depth vendor product benchmarking

Key Players Mentioned in the Game Leather and Skin Products Market Research Report:

Glacier Wear, Klein Karoo, African Gameskin Group (Pty) Ltd, AfriTan Tannery, Rocky Mountain Tanners, Sunderland Leather

Game Leather and Skin Products Market Segmentation:

By Product Type, the market is primarily split into:

• Natural leather
• Synthetic leather

By application, this report covers the following segments:

• In line
• Fairs
• Craft workshops
• Other

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Scope of the Leather and Game Skin Products Market Report

ATTRIBUTES DETAILS
ESTIMATED YEAR 2022
YEAR OF REFERENCE 2021
FORECAST YEAR 2029
HISTORICAL YEAR 2020
UNITY Value (million USD/billion)
SECTORS COVERED Types, applications, end users, and more.
REPORT COVER Revenue Forecast, Business Ranking, Competitive Landscape, Growth Factors and Trends
BY REGION North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Latin America, Middle East and Africa
CUSTOMIZATION SCOPE Free report customization (equivalent to up to 4 analyst business days) with purchase. Added or changed country, region and segment scope.

Geographic segment covered in the report:

The Game Leather and Skin Products report provides information on the market area, which is sub-categorized into sub-regions and countries/regions. In addition to the market share in each country and sub-region, this chapter of this report also contains information on profit opportunities. This chapter of the report mentions the market share and growth rate of each region, country and sub-region over the estimated period.

• North America (USA and Canada)
• Europe (UK, Germany, France and rest of Europe)
• Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, India and the rest of the Asia-Pacific region)
• Latin America (Brazil, Mexico and rest of Latin America)
• Middle East and Africa (GCC and Rest of Middle East and Africa)

Answers to key questions in this Leather and Skin Products Market report

  1. How much revenue will the Gaming Leather & Skin Products Market generate by the end of forecast period?
  2. Which market segment is expected to have the maximum market share?
  3. What are the influencing factors and their impact on the Leather and Game Skin Products market?
  4. Which regions are currently contributing the maximum share of the overall game leather and skin products market?
  5. What indicators are likely to drive the Game Skin Products Market?
  6. What are the key strategies of the major players in the Game Skin Products market to expand their geographical presence?
  7. What are the key advancements in the Game Skin Products market?
  8. How do regulatory standards affect the market for game hide products?

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Pandemic delays will plague polar science until the end of this decade | Science

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In March 2020, staff at McMurdo Station, the main US research base in Antarctica, thought the future was bright. Long-planned renovations had begun, including replacing the decrepit dormitories with shiny new lodges capable of housing more than 200 people. But then the pandemic hit, ending most of the two summer field seasons at McMurdo and other polar research sites, mostly in Antarctica and Greenland. In some places, the effects of this shutdown will linger for the rest of the decade, the National Science Foundation (NSF) announced this week, delaying projects and limiting access to one of the rarest resources in geoscience: the time on the ice.

In Greenland, government entry restrictions kept most researchers away in the summer of 2021. Although the NSF has kept its high-altitude Summit station in operation year-round, only minimal maintenance has taken place, explains Jennifer Mercer, chief of the NSF Arctic Section. Since almost a meter of snow falls on the camp each year, this summer will require a lot of snow removal. “We have a constant battle to keep buildings above ground level,” Mercer says.

After the excavations, research in Greenland will be about to return to normal. That’s not the case in Antarctica, where “we’ve been saturated for some time in key logistics areas,” says Stephanie Short, Antarctic logistics manager at NSF. No work has been done on McMurdo’s renovation in the past 2 years, and space in the old dorms had to be reserved to accommodate possible COVID-19 cases, leaving the agency further down. of 200 beds. “To regain our full strength,” Short says, “we need this accommodation building.”

For now, research in Antarctica will prioritize ongoing projects that feature either strong international participation – such as the international collaboration on the Thwaites Glacier – or critical annual measurements, says Michael Jackson, Antarctic Earth Science Manager at the NSF. New start-ups will favor projects led by early-career researchers. But some new projects will still have to be delayed, he says. “It’s heartbreaking for us,” he said. “Having to call someone who’s been postponed for 2 years and tell them they’re postponed again is not a good call.”

In 2019, before the pandemic, workers could keep Summit station in spades.US National Science Foundation

One such deferred project is a plan to drill into the Dome of Hercules, a stretch of ice 400 kilometers from the South Pole. Ice cores from the dome could capture evidence of when the West Antarctic Ice Sheet last collapsed in a slightly warmer climate and help predict when it might happen again. When the NSF agreed to fund the project in 2020, researchers thought drilling could begin by 2023. Now 2025 seems more likely, says Eric Steig, the project’s principal investigator and glaciologist at the University of Washington, Seattle. .

Steig says the pandemic hit a business that was already overstretched. “NSF is always planning more projects [in Antarctica] than they are likely to be able to handle, so even without COVID we are still experiencing significant delays. And despite the agency’s plan to prioritize early-career projects, he says, many young researchers may be left behind, as projects led by senior researchers also typically support many early-stage researchers. career. But there are no simple solutions, and “I have great faith in the people responsible for the NSF program,” he says.

For all the misery of the pandemic, it has also spurred collaboration between American researchers and agencies in Greenland, including the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources. Early on, Greenlandic researchers worked on an NSF project led by Columbia University. It aims to help several Greenlandic communities understand the effect of climate change on local sea levels, which are unexpectedly likely to drop by the end of the century, some by several meters, as the earth rebounds after losing the weight of the ice and the gravitational pull of the massive ice cap on the surrounding ocean ebbs.

The Greenlandic researchers were able to continue working on the project even without the Columbia team present, says Kirsty Tinto, a Columbia geophysicist. They interviewed community leaders – hunters, fishermen, town planners – about how they use the waterfront. And Greenlandic geophysics students were able to sail on cruises that mapped the harbor’s seabed. “All sorts of serendipity happened in this setting,” says Tinto.

Even before the pandemic, this was a different type of geoscience project, one focused on local collaboration and politics. But the pandemic has shown its resilience, says Tinto. “I don’t like pandemics. I don’t like global desperation. But, she says, “I like to have my expectations mixed up.”

ELEVATE CREDIT, INC. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (Form 10-Q)

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The following Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and
Results of Operations ("MD&A") is intended to help the reader understand our
business, our results of operations and our financial condition. The MD&A is
provided as a supplement to, and should be read in conjunction with our
unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and the related notes and
other financial information included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form
10-Q.

Some of the information contained in this discussion and analysis, including
information with respect to our plans and strategy for our business, includes
forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. You should
review the "Note About Forward-Looking Statements" section of this Quarterly
Report on Form 10-Q for a discussion of important factors that could cause
actual results to differ materially from the results described in or implied by
the forward-looking statements contained in the following discussion and
analysis. We generally refer to loans, customers and other information and data
associated with each of our brands (Rise, Elastic and Today Card) as Elevate's
loans, customers, information and data, irrespective of whether Elevate directly
originates the credit to the customer or whether such credit is originated by a
third party.

OVERVIEW

We provide online credit solutions to consumers in the US who are not
well-served by traditional bank products and who are looking for better options
than payday loans, title loans, pawn and storefront installment loans. Non-prime
consumers now represent a larger market than prime consumers but are riskier to
underwrite and serve with traditional approaches. We're succeeding at it - and
doing it responsibly - with best-in-class advanced technology and proprietary
risk analytics honed by serving more than 2.7 million customers with $10.0
billion in credit. Our current online credit products, Rise, Elastic and Today
Card, reflect our mission to provide customers with access to competitively
priced credit and services while helping them build a brighter financial future
with credit building and financial wellness features. We call this mission "Good
Today, Better Tomorrow."

We earn revenues on the Rise installment loans, on the Rise and Elastic lines of
credit and on the Today Card credit card product. Our revenue primarily consists
of finance charges and line of credit fees. Finance charges are driven by our
average loan balances outstanding and by the average annual percentage rate
("APR") associated with those outstanding loan balances. We calculate our
average loan balances by taking a simple daily average of the ending loan
balances outstanding for each period. Line of credit fees are recognized when
they are assessed and recorded to revenue over the life of the loan. We present
certain key metrics and other information on a "combined" basis to reflect
information related to loans originated by us and by our bank partners that
license our brands, Republic Bank, FinWise Bank and Capital Community Bank
("CCB"), as well as loans originated by third-party lenders pursuant to CSO
programs, which loans originated through CSO programs are not recorded on our
balance sheet in accordance with US GAAP. See "-Key Financial and Operating
Metrics" and "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures."

We use our working capital and our credit facility with Victory Park Management,
LLC ("VPC" and the "VPC Facility") to fund the loans we directly make to our
Rise customers. The VPC Facility has a maximum total borrowing amount available
of $200 million at March 31, 2022.

We also license our Rise installment loan brand to two banks. FinWise Bank
originates Rise installment loans in 17 states. This bank initially provides all
of the funding, retains 4% of the balances of all of the loans originated and
sells the remaining 96% loan participation in those Rise installment loans to a
third-party SPV, EF SPV, Ltd. ("EF SPV"). These loan participation purchases are
funded through a separate financing facility (the "EF SPV Facility"), and
through cash flows from operations generated by EF SPV. The EF SPV Facility has
a maximum total borrowing amount available of $250 million. We do not own EF
SPV, but we have a credit default protection agreement with EF SPV whereby we
provide credit protection to the investors in EF SPV against Rise loan losses in
return for a credit premium. As the primary beneficiary, Elevate is required to
consolidate EF SPV as a variable interest entity ("VIE") under US GAAP and the
condensed consolidated financial statements include revenue, losses and loans
receivable related to the 96% of the Rise installment loans originated by
FinWise Bank and sold to EF SPV.



                                       39
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Beginning in the third quarter of 2020, we also license our Rise installment
loan brand to an additional bank, CCB, which originates Rise installment loans
in three different states than FinWise Bank. Similar to the relationship with
FinWise Bank, CCB initially provides all of the funding, retains 5% of the
balances of all of the loans originated and sells the remaining 95% loan
participation in those Rise installment loans to a third-party SPV, EC SPV, Ltd.
("EC SPV"). These loan participation purchases are funded through a separate
financing facility (the "EC SPV Facility"), and through cash flows from
operations generated by EC SPV. The EC SPV Facility has a maximum total
borrowing amount available of $100 million. We do not own EC SPV, but we have a
credit default protection agreement with EC SPV whereby we provide credit
protection to the investors in EC SPV against Rise loan losses in return for a
credit premium. As the primary beneficiary, Elevate is required to consolidate
EC SPV as a VIE under US GAAP and the condensed consolidated financial
statements include revenue, losses and loans receivable related to the 95% of
the Rise installment loans originated by CCB and sold to EC SPV.

The Elastic line of credit product is originated by a third-party lender,
Republic Bank, which initially provides all of the funding for that product.
Republic Bank retains 10% of the balances of all loans originated and sells a
90% loan participation in the Elastic lines of credit. An SPV structure was
implemented such that the loan participations are sold by Republic Bank to
Elastic SPV, Ltd. ("Elastic SPV") and Elastic SPV receives its funding from VPC
in a separate financing facility (the "ESPV Facility"), which was finalized on
July 13, 2015. We do not own Elastic SPV, but we have a credit default
protection agreement with Elastic SPV whereby we provide credit protection to
the investors in Elastic SPV against Elastic loan losses in return for a credit
premium. Per the terms of this agreement, under US GAAP, we are the primary
beneficiary of Elastic SPV and are required to consolidate the financial results
of Elastic SPV as a VIE in our condensed consolidated financial statements. The
ESPV Facility has a maximum total borrowing amount available of $350 million at
March 31, 2022.

Today Card is a credit card product designed to meet the spending needs of
non-prime consumers by offering a prime customer experience. Today Card is
originated by CCB under the licensed MasterCard brand, and a 95% participation
interest in the credit card receivable is sold to us. These credit card
receivable purchases are funded through a separate financing facility (the "TSPV
Facility"), and through cash flows from operations generated by the Today Card
portfolio. The TSPV Facility has a maximum commitment amount of $50 million,
which may be increased up to $100 million. As the lowest APR product in our
portfolio, Today Card allows us to serve a broader spectrum of non-prime
Americans. The Today Card experienced significant growth in its portfolio size
despite the pandemic due to the success of our direct mail campaigns, the
primary marketing channel for acquiring new Today Card customers. We are
following a specific growth plan to grow the product while monitoring customer
responses and credit quality. Customer response to the Today Card is very
strong, as we continue to see extremely high response rates, high customer
engagement, and positive customer satisfaction scores.

In January 2022, we collaborated with Central Pacific Bank ("CPB") to invest in
the launch of a new fintech company, Swell Financial, Inc. ("Swell"). The Swell
App includes several groundbreaking features to help customers automatically
control their spending, tackle debt, and invest in exclusive private market
opportunities with as little as $1 thousand. We will help CPB and Swell offer
the Swell Credit line of credit product with APRs between 8% and 24%. Our
current total investment carrying value in Swell, using equity method
accounting, is $5.5 million and we have a non-controlling interest in Swell.

Our management evaluates our financial performance and our future strategic objectives using key indicators based primarily on the following three themes:

•Revenue growth.   Key metrics related to revenue growth that we monitor by
product include the ending and average combined loan balances outstanding, the
effective APR of our product loan portfolios, the total dollar value of loans
originated, the number of new customer loans made, the ending number of customer
loans outstanding and the related customer acquisition costs ("CAC") associated
with each new customer loan made. We include CAC as a key metric when analyzing
revenue growth (rather than as a key metric within margin expansion).

•Stable credit quality.   Since the time they were managing our legacy US
products, our management team has maintained stable credit quality across the
loan portfolio they were managing. Additionally, in the periods covered in this
Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of
Operations, we have maintained our strong credit quality. With the adoption of
fair value for the loans receivable portfolio effective January 1, 2022, the
credit quality metrics we monitor include net charge-offs as a percentage of
revenues, change in fair value of loans receivable as a percentage of revenues,
the percentage of past due combined loans receivable - principal and net
principal charge-offs as a percentage of average combined loans
receivable-principal. Prior to our adoption of fair value for the loans
receivable portfolio effective January 1, 2022, our credit quality metrics also
included the combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of outstanding combined
loans and total provision for loan losses as a percentage of revenues. Under
fair value accounting, a specific loan loss reserve is no longer required to be
recognized as a credit loss estimate is a key assumption used in measuring fair
value. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for further information.



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•Margin expansion.   We aim to manage our business to achieve a long-term
operating margin of 20%. In periods of significant loan portfolio growth, our
margins may become compressed due to the upfront costs associated with
marketing. Prior to our adoption of fair value for the loans receivable
portfolio, we incurred upfront credit provisioning expense associated with loan
portfolio growth. When applying fair value accounting, estimated credit loss is
a key assumption within the fair value assumptions used each quarter and
specific loan loss allowance is no longer required to be recognized. As we
continue to rebuild and scale our portfolio from the impacts of COVID-19, we
anticipate that our direct marketing costs primarily associated with new
customer acquisitions will be approximately 10% of revenues and our operating
expenses will decline to 20% of revenues. While our operating margins may exceed
20% in certain years, such as in 2020 when we incurred lower levels of direct
marketing expense and materially lower credit losses due to a lack of customer
demand for loans resulting from the effects of COVID-19, we do not expect our
operating margin to increase beyond that level over the long-term, as we intend
to pass on any improvements over our targeted margins to our customers in the
form of lower APRs. We believe this is a critical component of our responsible
lending platform and over time will also help us continue to attract new
customers and retain existing customers.

Choice of fair value option

Prior to January 1, 2022, we carried our combined loans receivable portfolio at
amortized cost, net of an allowance for estimated loan losses inherent in the
combined loan portfolio. Effective January 1, 2022, we elected the fair value
option to account for all our combined loan portfolio in conjunction with our
early adoption of Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments ("ASU
2016-13") and the related amendments. We believe the election of the fair value
option better reflects the value of our portfolio and its future economic
performance as well as more closely aligns with our decision-making processes
that relies on unit economics that align with discounted cash flow methodologies
that are utilized in fair value accounting. Refer to Note 1 for discussion of
the election and its impact on our accounting policies.

In accordance with the transition guidance, on January 1, 2022, we released the
allowance for loan losses and measured the combined loans receivable at fair
value at adoption. The cumulative-effect adjustment, net of tax, was recognized
collectively as a net increase of $98.6 million to opening Retained earnings.

In comparing our current period results under the fair value option to prior
periods, it may be helpful to consider that loans receivable are carried at fair
value with changes in fair value of loans receivable recorded in the Condensed
Consolidated Statements of Operations. The fair value takes into consideration
expected lifetime losses of the loans receivable, whereas the prior method
incorporated only incurred losses recognized as an allowance for loan losses. As
such, changes in credit quality, amongst other significant assumptions,
typically have a more significant impact on the carrying value of the combined
loans receivable portfolio under the fair value option. See "-Non-GAAP Financial
Measures" for further information.

Impact of COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic and related restrictive measures taken by governments,
businesses and individuals caused unprecedented uncertainty, volatility and
disruption in financial markets and in governmental, commercial and consumer
activity in the United States, including the markets that we serve. As the
restrictive measures have been eased in certain geographic locations, the U.S.
economy has begun to recover, and with the availability and distribution of
COVID-19 vaccines, we anticipate continued improvements in commercial and
consumer activity and the U.S. economy. While positive signs exist, we recognize
that certain of our customers are experiencing varying degrees of financial
distress, which may continue, especially if new COVID-19 variant infections
increase and new economic restrictions are mandated.

In 2020, we experienced a significant decline in the loan portfolio due to a
lack of customer demand for loans resulting from the effects of COVID-19 and
related government stimulus programs. These impacts resulted in a lower level of
direct marketing expense and materially lower credit losses during 2020 and
continuing into early 2021. Beginning in the second quarter of 2021, we
experienced a return of demand for the loan products that we, and the bank
originators we support, offer, resulting in significant growth in the loan
portfolio from that point. This significant loan portfolio growth resulted in
compressed margins in 2021 due to the upfront costs associated with marketing
and credit provisioning expense related to growing and "rebuilding" the loan
portfolio from the impacts of COVID-19. We continue to target loan portfolio
originations within our target CACs of $250-$300 and credit quality metrics of
45-55% of revenue which, when combined with our expectation of continuing
customer loan demand for our portfolio products, we believe will allow us to
return to our historical performance levels prior to COVID-19 after initially
resulting in earnings compression.



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Both we and the bank originators are closely monitoring the key credit quality
indicators such as payment defaults, continued payment deferrals, and line of
credit utilization. While we initially anticipated that the COVID-19 pandemic
would have a negative impact on our credit quality, instead the monetary
stimulus programs provided by the US government to our customer base have
generally allowed customers to continue making payments on their loans. At the
beginning of the pandemic, we expected an increase in net charge-offs as
compared to prior periods but experienced historically low net charge-offs as a
percentage of revenue in the second half of 2020 and early 2021. With the
increased volume of new customer loans we originated in the third and fourth
quarters of 2021 as we grew the loan portfolio to a level that approximated our
pre-pandemic size and the ending of government assistance, we are experiencing a
short-term increase in net charge-offs in excess of our targeted range with an
expectation of net charge-offs returning to our targeted range of 45-55% of
revenue as the portfolio becomes more seasoned with a balance of new and
returning customers, in the second half of 2022.

We have implemented a hybrid remote environment where employees may choose to
work primarily from the office or from home and gather collectively in the
office on a limited basis. We have sought to ensure our employees feel secure in
their jobs, have flexibility in their work location and have the resources they
need to stay safe and healthy. As a 100% online lending solutions provider, our
technology and underwriting platform has continued to serve our customers and
the bank originators that we support without any material interruption in
services.

COVID-19 has had a significant adverse impact on our business, and while
uncertainty still exists, we believe we are well-positioned to operate
effectively through the present economic environment and expect continued loan
portfolio growth and strong credit quality into the next year. We will continue
assessing our minimum cash and liquidity requirement, monitoring our debt
covenant compliance and implementing measures to ensure that our cash and
liquidity position is maintained through the current economic cycle.

KEY FINANCIAL AND OPERATIONAL INDICATORS

As discussed above, we regularly monitor a number of metrics in order to measure
our current performance and project our future performance. These metrics aid us
in developing and refining our growth strategies and in making strategic
decisions.

Certain of our metrics are non-GAAP financial measures. We believe that such
metrics are useful in period-to-period comparisons of our core business.
However, non-GAAP financial measures are not an alternative to any measure of
financial performance calculated and presented in accordance with US GAAP. See
"-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for a reconciliation of our non-GAAP measures to
US GAAP.

Revenues

                                                                                        As of and for the three months ended
                                                                                                      March 31,
Revenue metrics (dollars in thousands, except as noted)                                       2022                   2021
Revenues                                                                               $     124,244            $    89,733
Period-over-period change in revenue                                                              38    %               (45) %
Ending combined loans receivable - principal(1)                                        $     511,319            $   353,089
Average combined loans receivable - principal(1)(2)                                    $     535,857            $   378,877
Total combined loans originated - principal                                            $     205,487            $   133,514
Average customer loan balance(3)                                                       $       1,993            $     1,817
Number of new customer loans                                                                  19,303                 13,890
Ending number of combined loans outstanding                                                  256,615                194,331
Customer acquisition costs                                                             $         323            $       316
Effective APR of combined loan portfolio                                                          93    %                96  %


_________

(1)Combined loans receivable is defined as loans owned by us and consolidated
VIEs plus loans originated and owned by third-party lenders pursuant to our CSO
programs. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a
reconciliation of Combined loans receivable to Loans receivable, net, / Loans
receivable at fair value, the most directly comparable financial measures
calculated in accordance with US GAAP.
(2)Average combined loans receivable - principal is calculated using an average
of daily Combined loans receivable - principal balances.
(3)Average customer loan balance is an average of all three products and is
calculated for each product by dividing the ending Combined loans receivable -
principal by the number of loans outstanding at period end.

Revenues. Our revenue is made up of Rise finance fees, Rise CSO fees (which are fees we receive from customers who obtain a loan through the CSO program for credit services, including loan guarantee, which we provide), revenue earned from the Elastic line of credit, and finance charges and fee revenue from the Today Card credit card product. See ”Components of Our Results of Operations – Revenues”.

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Ending and average combined loans receivable - principal.   We calculate the
average combined loans receivable - principal by taking a simple daily average
of the ending combined loans receivable - principal for each period. Key metrics
that drive the ending and average combined loans receivable - principal include
the amount of loans originated in a period and the average customer loan
balance. All loan balance metrics include only the 90% participation in the
related Elastic line of credit advances (we exclude the 10% held by Republic
Bank), the 96% participation in FinWise Bank originated Rise installment loans
and the 95% participation in CCB originated Rise installment loans and the 95%
participation in the CCB originated Today Card credit card receivables, but
include the full loan balances on CSO loans, which are not presented on our
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets.

Total combined loans originated - principal.  The amount of loans originated in
a period is driven primarily by loans to new customers as well as new loans to
prior customers, including refinancing of existing loans to customers in good
standing.

Average customer loan balance and effective APR of combined loan portfolio.
The average loan amount and its related APR are based on the product and the
underlying credit quality of the customer. Generally, better credit quality
customers are offered higher loan amounts at lower APRs. Additionally, new
customers have more potential risk of loss than prior or existing customers due
to lack of payment history and the potential for fraud. As a result, newer
customers typically will have lower loan amounts and higher APRs to compensate
for that additional risk of loss. The effective APR is calculated based on the
actual amount of finance charges generated from a customer loan divided by the
average outstanding balance for the loan and can be lower than the stated APR on
the loan due to waived finance charges and other reasons. For example, a Rise
customer may receive a $2,000 installment loan with a term of 24 months and a
stated rate of 130%. In this example, the customer's monthly installment loan
payment would be $236.72. As the customer can prepay the loan balance at any
time with no additional fees or early payment penalty, the customer pays the
loan in full in month eight. The customer's loan earns interest of $1,657.39
over the eight-month period and has an average outstanding balance of $1,912.37.
The effective APR for this loan is 130% over the eight-month period calculated
as follows:

($1,657.39 interest earned / $1,912.37 average outstanding balance) x 12 months per year = 130%

8 months

In addition, as an example for Elastic, if a customer makes a $2,500 draw on the
customer's line of credit and this draw required bi-weekly minimum payments of
5% (equivalent to 20 bi-weekly payments), and if all minimum payments are made,
the draw would earn finance charges of $1,125. The effective APR for the line of
credit in this example is 107% over the payment period and is calculated as
follows:

($1,125.00 fees earned / $1,369.05 average unpaid balance) x 26 fortnight periods per year = 107%

20 payments

The actual total revenue we realize on a loan portfolio is also impacted by the
amount of prepayments and charged-off customer loans in the portfolio. For a
single loan, on average, we typically expect to realize approximately 60% of the
revenues that we would otherwise realize if the loan were to fully amortize at
the stated APR. From the Rise example above, if we waived $350 of interest for
this customer, the effective APR for this loan would decrease to 103%. From the
Elastic example above, if we waived $125 of fees for this customer, the
effective APR for this loan would decrease to 95%.

Number of new customer loans.  We define a new customer loan as the first loan
or advance made to a customer for each of our products (so a customer receiving
a Rise installment loan and then at a later date taking their first cash advance
on an Elastic line of credit would be counted twice). The number of new customer
loans is subject to seasonal fluctuations. New customer acquisition is typically
slowest during the first six months of each calendar year, primarily in the
first quarter, compared to the latter half of the year, as our existing and
prospective customers usually receive tax refunds during this period and, thus,
have less of a need for loans from us. Further, many customers will use their
tax refunds to prepay all or a portion of their loan balance during this period,
so our overall loan portfolio typically decreases during the first quarter of
the calendar year. Overall loan portfolio growth and the number of new customer
loans tends to accelerate during the summer months (typically June and July), at
the beginning of the school year (typically late August to early September) and
during the winter holidays (typically late November to early December).

Customer acquisition costs.  A key expense metric we monitor related to loan
growth is our CAC. This metric is the amount of direct marketing costs incurred
during a period divided by the number of new customer loans originated during
that same period. New loans to former customers are not included in our
calculation of CAC (except to the extent they receive a loan through a different
product) as we believe we incur no material direct marketing costs to make
additional loans to a prior customer through the same product.



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The following tables summarize the evolution of customer loans by product for the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021.

                                                                   Three Months Ended March 31, 2022
                                                Rise                    Elastic                 Today
                                                                       (Lines of
                                         (Installment Loans)            Credit)             (Credit Card)             Total
Beginning number of combined
loans outstanding                              134,414                   110,628                  35,464              280,506
New customer loans originated                   12,147                     4,392                   2,764               19,303
Former customer loans originated                15,702                       136                       -               15,838
Attrition                                      (44,187)                  (12,183)                 (2,662)             (59,032)
Ending number of combined loans
outstanding                                    118,076                   102,973                  35,566              256,615
Customer acquisition cost (in
dollars)                                $          330              $        462          $           70          $       323
Average customer loan balance (in
dollars)                                $        2,341              $      1,806          $        1,376          $     1,993



                                                                   Three Months Ended March 31, 2021
                                                Rise                    Elastic                 Today
                                                                       (Lines of
                                         (Installment Loans)            Credit)             (Credit Card)             Total
Beginning number of combined
loans outstanding                              103,940                   100,105                  10,803              214,848
New customer loans originated                    8,656                     2,852                   2,382               13,890
Former customer loans originated                12,856                        94                       -               12,950
Attrition                                      (33,944)                  (13,030)                   (383)             (47,357)
Ending number of combined loans
outstanding                                     91,508                    90,021                  12,802              194,331
Customer acquisition cost (in
dollars)                                $          327              $        475          $           83          $       316
Average customer loan balance (in
dollars)                                $        2,209              $      1,514          $        1,149          $     1,817



Recent trends.  Our revenues for the three months ended March 31, 2022 totaled
$124.2 million, an increase of 38% versus the three months ended March 31, 2021.
The increase in quarterly revenue is primarily attributable to higher average
combined loans receivable-principal as we saw growth in all of our products in
the first quarter of 2022. Rise, Elastic, and the Today products experienced
year-over-year increases in revenues of 38%, 29%, and 254%, respectively, which
were attributable to increases in year-over-year average loan balances as we
focused on growing the portfolios beginning in the second half of 2021. The
Today Card balances increased significantly over the past year due to an
increase in marketing and origination activity during the second half of 2021,
and due to the nature of the product which provides an added convenience of
having a credit card for online purchases of day-to-day items such as groceries
or clothing (whereas the primary usage of a Rise installment loan or Elastic
line of credit is for emergency financial needs such as a medical deductible or
automobile repair).

We experienced an increase in new and former customers as demand for the loan
products provided by us and the bank originators increased beginning in the
second quarter of 2021 and continuing through the first quarter of 2022. This is
in contrast to 2020 and early 2021 when the portfolio of loan products
experienced significantly decreased loan demand for both new and former
customers due to COVID-19, including the effects of monetary stimulus provided
by the US government reducing demand for loan products. All three of our
products experienced an increase in principal loan balances in the first quarter
of 2022 compared to a year ago. Rise and Elastic principal loan balances at
March 31, 2022 totaled $276.4 million and $186.0 million, respectively, up
roughly $74.3 million and $49.7 million, respectively, from a year ago. Today
Card principal loan balances at March 31, 2022 totaled $48.9 million, up $34.2
million from a year ago.



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Our CAC was slightly higher in the first quarter of 2022 at $323 as compared to
the first quarter of 2021 at $316, with the first quarter CAC generally higher
than our targeted range of $250-$300 due to the seasonal decrease in loan demand
due to income tax refunds in the first quarter of each year. The new customer
loan volume is being sourced from all our marketing channels including direct
mail, strategic partners and digital. We've seen a marked improvement in loan
volume from our strategic partners channel where we have improved our technology
and risk capabilities to interface with the strategic partners via our
application programming interface (APIs) that we developed within our new
technology platform ("Blueprint"). Blueprint will allow us to more efficiently
acquire new customers within our targeted CAC range. We believe our CAC in
future quarters, and on an annual basis, will continue to remain within or below
our target range of $250 to $300 as we continue to optimize the efficiency of
our marketing channels and continue to grow the Today Card which successfully
generated new customers at a sub-$100 CAC.

Credit quality

                                                                         As 

from and for the three months ended March, 31stCredit quality measures (in thousands of dollars), after adopting fair value

                                                                      2022               2021 (Pro-forma)(6)
Net charge-offs(1)                                                       $      76,819            $           30,890
Net change in fair value(1)(6)                                                   7,340                         4,667
Total change in fair value of loans receivable (6)                       $      84,159            $           35,557

Net charge-offs as a percentage of revenues (1)                                     62    %                       34  %
Total change in fair value of loans receivable as a percentage of
revenues(6)                                                                         68    %                       40  %
Percentage past due                                                                 11    %                        6  %
Fair value premium(6)                                                               10    %                       13  %


                                                                              As of and for the three months ended
                                                                                            March 31,

Credit quality measures (in thousands of dollars), before the adoption of fair value

                                                                                    2021
Net charge-offs(2)                                                            $                      30,890
Additional provision for loan losses(2)                                                              (9,920)
Provision for loan losses                                                     $                      20,970

Total provision for loan losses as a percentage of revenues                                              23       %
Net charge-offs as a percentage of revenues(2)                                                           34       %
Percentage past due                                                                                       6       %
Combined loan loss reserve(4)                                                 $                      39,159
Combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of combined loans
receivable(3)(4)(5)                                                                                      10       %


_________

(1)Net charge-offs and net change in fair value of loans receivable are not
financial measures prepared in accordance with US GAAP. Net charge-offs include
the amount of principal and accrued interest on loans that are more than 60 days
past due (Rise and Elastic) or 120 days past due (Today Card), or sooner if we
receive notice that the loan will not be collected, such as a bankruptcy notice
or identified fraud, offset by any recoveries. Net change in fair value reflects
the adjustment recognized related to the change in the fair value mark during
the reported period. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and
for a reconciliation to Change in fair value of loans receivable, the most
directly comparable financial measure calculated in accordance with US GAAP.
(2)Net charge-offs and additional provision for loan losses are not financial
measures prepared in accordance with US GAAP. Net charge-offs include the amount
of principal and accrued interest on loans that are more than 60 days past due
(Rise and Elastic) or 120 days past due (Today Card), or sooner if we receive
notice that the loan will not be collected, such as a bankruptcy notice or
identified fraud, offset by any recoveries. Additional provision for loan losses
is the amount of provision for loan losses needed for a particular period to
adjust the combined loan loss reserve to the appropriate level in accordance
with our underlying loan loss reserve methodology. See "-Non-GAAP Financial
Measures" for more information and for a reconciliation to Provision for loan
losses, the most directly comparable financial measure calculated in accordance
with US GAAP.
(3)Combined loans receivable is defined as loans owned by us and consolidated
VIEs plus loans originated and owned by third-party lenders pursuant to our CSO
programs. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a
reconciliation of Combined loans receivable to Loans receivable, net, the most
directly comparable financial measure calculated in accordance with US GAAP.
(4)Combined loan loss reserve is defined as the loan loss reserve for loans
originated and owned by us and consolidated VIEs plus the loan loss reserve for
loans owned by third-party lenders and guaranteed by us. See "-Non-GAAP
Financial Measures" for more information and for a reconciliation of Combined
loan loss reserve to Allowance for loan losses, the most directly comparable
financial measure calculated in accordance with US GAAP.
(5)Combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of combined loans receivable is
determined using period-end balances.



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(6)We have provided pro-forma information reflecting the adoption of fair value
in the 2021 financial period to provide comparability to the 2022 financial
period. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a
reconciliation to previously reported amounts for 2021 calculated in accordance
with US GAAP. The pro-forma fair value adjustments reflect fair value
methodology acceptable with US GAAP.

Net principal charge-offs as a percentage of
average combined loans receivable - principal                First              Second               Third              Fourth
(1)(2)(3)                                                   Quarter             Quarter             Quarter             Quarter
2022                                                          11%                 N/A                 N/A                 N/A
2021                                                          6%                  5%                  6%                  10%
2020                                                          11%                 10%                 4%                  5%


_________

(1)Net principal charge-offs is comprised of gross principal charge-offs less
recoveries.
(2)Average combined loans receivable - principal is calculated using an average
of daily Combined loans receivable - principal balances during each quarter.
(3)Combined loans receivable is defined as loans owned by us and consolidated
VIEs plus loans originated and owned by third-party lenders pursuant to our CSO
programs. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a
reconciliation of Combined loans receivable to the most directly comparable
financial measure calculated in accordance with US GAAP.

Net principal charge-offs as a percentage of average combined loans
receivable-principal for the first quarter of 2022 is higher than the first
quarter of 2021 and consistent with this credit metric during 2019 and the first
quarter of 2020. The above chart depicts the historically low charge-off metrics
from the third quarter of 2020 through the third quarter of 2021, due to
COVID-19 pandemic impacts such as a lack of new customer demand, our
implementation of payment assistance tools, and government stimulus payments
received by our customers. Beginning in the fourth quarter of 2021, net
principal charge-offs as a percentage of average combined loans
receivable-principal have returned to the levels consistent with 2019 due to the
increased volume of new customers being originated as we rebuilt the loan
portfolio from the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic in the second half of 2021
and return to a more normalized credit profile.

Upon adoption of fair value for the combined loans receivable portfolio on
January 1, 2022, in reviewing the credit quality of our loan portfolio, we break
out our total change in fair value in loans receivable that is presented on our
Condensed Combined Statement of Operations under US GAAP into two separate
items-net charge-offs and net change in fair value. Net charge-offs are
indicative of the credit quality of our underlying portfolio, while net change
in fair value is subject to more fluctuation based on loan portfolio growth and
changes in assumptions used in the fair value methodology. The net change in
fair value is the change in the reporting period between the current period fair
value mark as compared to the beginning of period fair value mark. With all
other assumptions held flat and a fair value premium associated with the
combined loan portfolio, we would expect the net change in fair value to be
positive in periods of growth in the loan portfolio and expect the net change in
fair value to be negative in periods of attrition in the loan portfolio.

Net charge-offs. Net charge-offs comprise gross charge-offs offset by recoveries
on prior charge-offs. Gross charge-offs include the amount of principal and
accrued interest on loans that are more than 60 days past due (Rise and Elastic)
or 120 days (Today Card), or sooner if we receive notice that the loan will not
be collected, such as a bankruptcy notice or identified fraud. Any payments
received on loans that have been charged off are recorded as recoveries and
reduce the total amount of gross charge-offs. Recoveries are typically less than
10% of the amount charged off, and thus, we do not view recoveries as a key
credit quality metric.

Net charge-offs as a percentage of revenues can vary based on several factors,
such as whether or not we experience significant growth or lower the APR of our
products. Additionally, although a more seasoned portfolio will typically result
in lower net charge-offs as a percentage of revenues, we do not intend to drive
down this ratio significantly below our historical ratios and would instead seek
to offer our existing products to a broader new customer base to drive
additional revenues.

Net charge-offs as a percentage of average combined loans receivable-principal
allow us to determine credit quality and evaluate loss experience trends across
our loan portfolio.



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Net change in fair value. Beginning January 1, 2022, we utilize the fair value
option on the combined loans receivable portfolio. As such, loans receivables
are carried at fair value in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets with
changes in fair value recorded in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of
Operations. To derive the fair value, we generally utilize discounted cash flow
analyses that factor in estimated losses and prepayments over the estimated
duration of the underlying assets. Loss and prepayment assumptions are
determined using historical loss data and include appropriate consideration of
recent trends and anticipated future performance. Hence, another key credit
quality metric we monitor is the percentage of past due combined loans
receivable - principal, as an increase in past due loans is a consideration in
the credit loss assumption used in the fair value assumptions as a significant
increase in the percentage of past due loans may indicate a future increase in
credit loss in the portfolio. As such, changes in credit quality, amongst other
significant assumptions, typically have a more significant impact on the
carrying value of the combined loans receivable portfolio under the fair value
option. Future cash flows are discounted using a rate of return that we believe
a market participant would require. Accrued and unpaid interest and fees are
included in Loans receivable at fair value in the Condensed Consolidated Balance
Sheets.

Additional provision for loan losses.  For financial data prior to January 1,
2022, in reviewing the credit quality of our loan portfolio, we broke out our
total provision for loan losses that was presented on our statement of
operations under US GAAP into two separate items-net charge-offs (as discussed
above) and additional provision for loan losses. The additional provision for
loan losses is the amount needed to adjust the combined loan loss reserve to the
appropriate amount at the end of each month based on our loan loss reserve
methodology.

Additional provision for loan losses relates to an increase in inherent losses
in the loan portfolio as determined by our loan loss reserve methodology. This
increase could be due to a combination of factors such as an increase in the
size of the loan portfolio or a worsening of credit quality or increase in past
due loans. It is also possible for the additional provision for loan losses for
a period to be a negative amount, which would reduce the amount of the combined
loan loss reserve needed (due to a decrease in the loan portfolio or improvement
in credit quality). The amount of additional provision for loan losses is
seasonal in nature, mirroring the seasonality of our new customer acquisition
and overall loan portfolio growth, as discussed above. The combined loan loss
reserve typically decreased during the first quarter or first half of the
calendar year due to a decrease in the loan portfolio from year end. Then, as
the rate of growth for the loan portfolio started to increase during the second
half of the year, additional provision for loan losses was typically needed to
increase the reserve for losses associated with the loan growth. Because of
this, our provision for loan losses varied significantly throughout the year
without a significant change in the credit quality of our portfolio.

Loan loss reserve methodology prior to January 1, 2022.  Our loan loss reserve
methodology was calculated separately for each product and, in the case of Rise
loans originated under the state lending model (including CSO program loans),
was calculated separately based on the state in which each customer resides to
account for varying state license requirements that affect the amount of the
loan offered, repayment terms and other factors. For each product, loss factors
were calculated based on the delinquency status of customer loan balances:
current, 1 to 30 days past due, 31 to 60 days past due or 61-120 past due (for
Today Card only). These loss factors for loans in each delinquency status were
based on average historical loss rates by product (or state) associated with
each of these three delinquency categories.

Recent trends.  Total change in fair value of loans receivable for the three
months ended March 31, 2022 and pro-forma three months ended March 31, 2021, was
68% and 40% of revenues, respectively, (See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for
more information and for a reconciliation to previously reported amounts for
2021 calculated in accordance with US GAAP.). Net charge-offs as a percentage of
revenues for the three months ended March 31, 2022 and 2021 were 62% and 34%,
respectively. The increase in net charge-offs as a percentage of revenues is due
to the increase in originations beginning in the second half of 2021 with a
heavier mix of new customers into the loan portfolio which have a higher credit
loss profile than returning customers. We expect the second quarter net
charge-offs as a percentage of revenue to be at the high end of our target range
of 45-55% of revenue and will return within our target range during the second
half of 2022 as the mix of new and returning customers in the portfolio
normalizes. We continue to monitor the portfolio during the economic recovery
resulting from COVID-19 and recent macro-economic factors and will adjust our
underwriting and credit policies to mitigate any potential negative impacts as
needed.

Past due loan balances at March 31, 2022 were 11% of total combined loans
receivable-principal, up from 6% from a year ago, due to the number of new
customers originated beginning in the second quarter of 2021 which is consistent
with our historical past due percentages prior to the pandemic. We, and the bank
originators we support, are no longer offering specific COVID-19 payment
deferral programs but continue to offer other payment flexibility programs if
certain qualifications are met. We are continuing to see that most customers are
meeting their scheduled payments once they exit the payment deferral program.



                                       47
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Net change in fair value as a percentage of revenue was 6% for both March 31,
2022 and pro-forma March 31, 2021, as the fair value premium was relatively flat
with the fair value premiums calculated during the prior reporting periods (See
"-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a reconciliation to
previously reported amounts for 2021 calculated in accordance with US GAAP.).
The fair value premium of the combined loans receivable-principal portfolio was
10% at March 31, 2022 compared to 13% at March 31, 2021 due to the composition
of the loan portfolio with an increased mix of newly originated loans at March
31, 2022 as compared to a more mature loan portfolio at March 31, 2021 due to
limited origination activity and significant paydowns experienced in the
portfolio due to the effects of COVID-19. The key assumptions used in the fair
value estimate at March 31, 2022 and 2021 are as follows:

                         March 31, 2022
Credit loss rate                   17  %
Prepayment rate                    27  %
Discount rate                      21  %



Total loan loss provision for the three months ended March 31, 2021, and prior
to the adoption of fair value, which was below our targeted range of
approximately 45% to 55%, was 23% of revenues. Net charge-offs as a percentage
of revenues for the three months ended March 31, 2021 was 34% due to reduced
demand and limited loan origination activity in 2020 and early 2021 coupled with
customers' receipt of monetary stimulus provided by the US government which
allowed customers to continue making payments on their loans.

The combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of combined loans receivable
totaled 10% as of March 31, 2021. The lower historical combined loan loss
reserve rate reflects the strong credit performance of the portfolio at March
31, 2021 due to the mature nature of the portfolio resulting from limited new
loan origination activity in 2020 and early 2021.



                                       48
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We also look at Rise and Elastic principal loan charge-offs (including both
credit and fraud losses) by loan vintage as a percentage of combined loans
originated-principal. As the below table shows, our cumulative principal loan
charge-offs for Rise and Elastic through March 31, 2022 for each annual vintage
since the 2013 vintage are generally under 30% and continue to generally trend
at or slightly below our 20% to 25% long-term targeted range. Our payment
deferral programs and monetary stimulus programs provided by the US government
in response to the COVID-19 pandemic have also assisted in reducing losses in
our 2019 and 2020 vintages coupled with a lower volume of new loan originations
in our 2020 vintage. While still early, we would expect the 2021 vintage to be
at or near 2018 levels or slightly lower given the increased volume of new
customer loans originated during the second half of 2021. It is also possible
that the cumulative loss rates on all vintages will increase and may exceed our
recent historical cumulative loss experience due to the economic impact of a
prolonged crisis resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic or the current
inflationary environment.[[Image Removed: elvt-20220331_g2.jpg]]

_________

1) The 2020 and 2021 vintages are not yet fully ripe from the point of view of losses. 2) UK included in 2013 to 2017 vintages only.


We also look at Today Card principal loan charge-offs (including both credit and
fraud losses) by account vintage as a percentage of account principal
originations. As the below table shows, our cumulative principal credit card
charge-offs through March 31, 2022 for the 2020 annual vintage is under 8%.
While our 2021 account vintage is currently performing better than 2020, we
expect the 2021 account vintage to have losses higher than the 2020 account
vintage based on the volume of new customers originated in the second half of
2021 and the performance of certain segments upon the release of the credit
model during 2021. The Today Card requires accounts to be charged off that are
more than 120 days past due which results in a longer maturity period for the
cumulative loss curve related to this portfolio. Our 2018 and 2019 vintages are
considered to be test vintages and were comprised of limited originations volume
and not reflective of our current underwriting standards.



                                       49
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[[Image Removed: elvt-20220331_g3.jpg]]

Margins

                                                    Three Months Ended March 31,
Margin metrics (dollars in thousands)               2022                       2021
Revenues                                     $      124,244                 $ 89,733
Net charge-offs(1)                                  (76,819)                 (30,890)
Change in fair value(1)                              (7,340)                       -
Additional provision for loan losses(1)                   -                    9,920
Direct marketing costs                               (6,226)                  (4,383)
Other cost of sales                                  (2,882)                  (2,047)
Gross profit                                         30,977                   62,333
Operating expenses                                  (38,281)                 (37,594)
Operating income (loss)                      $       (7,304)                $ 24,739
As a percentage of revenues:
Net charge-offs                                          62   %                   34  %
Change in fair value                                      6                 

Additional provision for loan losses                      -                      (11)
Direct marketing costs                                    5                        5
Other cost of sales                                       2                        2
Gross margin                                             25                       69
Operating expenses                                       31                       42
Operating margin                                         (6)  %                   28  %


_________

(1) Non-GAAP measure. See “-Non-GAAP Financial Measures – Net Write-offs and Net Change in Fair Value” and “-Non-GAAP Financial Measures – Net Write-offs and Additional Allowance for Loan Losses”.

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Gross margin is calculated as revenues minus cost of sales, or gross profit,
expressed as a percentage of revenues, and operating margin is calculated as
operating income expressed as a percentage of revenues. Due to the negative
impact of COVID-19 on our loan balances and revenue, we are monitoring our
profit margins closely. Long-term, we intend to continue to manage the business
to a targeted 20% operating margin.

Recent operating margin trends.  For the three months ended March 31, 2022, our
operating margin was (6)%, which was a decrease from 28% in the prior year
period, as originally reported, and a decrease of 11% on a pro-forma basis
considering the pro-forma adoption of fair value at the beginning of 2021 (See
"-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a reconciliation to
previously reported amounts for 2021 calculated in accordance with US GAAP.).
The margin decreases we are experiencing in 2022 are primarily driven by the
increased net charge-offs in the first quarter of 2022 due to a higher volume of
new customers originated in the loan portfolio during the second half of 2021 as
we rebuilt the portfolio from the impacts of COVID-19. As the portfolio matures
and we manage the mix of new and returning customers to the portfolio, we would
expect our net charge-offs to return to our target range of 45-55% and our gross
margin to normalize in future periods with our past historical performance. The
margins achieved in the first quarter of 2021 are not reflective of our
historical performance due to the limited origination activity in the loan
portfolio during 2020 and early 2021 due to a lack of customer demand resulting
from the effects of COVID-19 and related government stimulus programs. These
impacts resulted in a lower level of direct marketing expense and materially
lower credit losses during the first quarter of 2021 leading to an outsized
gross margin for the period.

Our operating expense metrics have been negatively impacted by the COVID-19
pandemic and its impact on loan balances and revenue. We began to see
improvements in our operating expense metric in the third and fourth quarter of
2021 due to the growth in the portfolio and associated increase in revenue
during those periods as we continued to manage and maintain a relatively
consistent operating expense during the latter half of the year and into the
first quarter of 2022. In the short term, with the continued growth in the loan
portfolio expected in 2022, we expect our expense metrics to continue to improve
and move toward our target range as we focus on growth to increase our new and
former customer loan volume and continue to scale the overall loan portfolio. In
the long term, as we grow the loan portfolio while actively managing our
operating expenses, we expect to see our operating expense metrics return to
approximately 20% of revenue.

NON-GAAP FINANCIAL MEASURES

We believe that the inclusion of the following non-GAAP financial measures in
this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q can provide a useful measure for
period-to-period comparisons of our core business, provide transparency and
useful information to investors and others in understanding and evaluating our
operating results, and enable investors to better compare our operating
performance with the operating performance of our competitors. Management uses
these non-GAAP financial measures frequently in its decision-making because they
provide supplemental information that facilitates internal comparisons to the
historical operating performance of prior periods and give an additional
indication of our core operating performance. However, non-GAAP financial
measures are not a measure calculated in accordance with US generally accepted
accounting principles, or US GAAP, and should not be considered an alternative
to any measures of financial performance calculated and presented in accordance
with US GAAP. Other companies may calculate these non-GAAP financial measures
differently than we do.


Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin

Adjusted EBITDA represents our net income (loss) adjusted to exclude:

• Net interest expense primarily associated with notes payable under credit facilities used to fund loan portfolios;

•Remuneration in shares;

• Depreciation of fixed assets and intangible assets;

• Gains or losses from an investment using the equity method;

•Settlement related to litigation included in non-operating income; and

•Income taxes.

Adjusted EBITDA margin is Adjusted EBITDA divided by revenue.

Management believes that Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin are useful
supplemental measures to assist management and investors in analyzing the
operating performance of the business and provide greater transparency into the
results of operations of our core business.



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Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin should not be considered as
alternatives to net income (loss) or any other performance measure derived in
accordance with US GAAP. Our use of Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin
has limitations as an analytical tool, and you should not consider it in
isolation or as a substitute for analysis of our results as reported under US
GAAP. Some of these limitations are:

•Although depreciation and amortization are non-cash charges, the assets being
depreciated and amortized may have to be replaced in the future, and Adjusted
EBITDA does not reflect expected cash capital expenditure requirements for such
replacements or for new capital assets;

•Adjusted EBITDA does not reflect changes or cash requirements for our working capital requirements; and

•Adjusted EBITDA does not reflect interest associated with notes payable used
for funding the loan portfolios, for other corporate purposes or tax payments
that may represent a reduction in cash available to us.

The following table provides a reconciliation of net earnings (loss) to Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA margin for each of the periods indicated:

                                          Three Months Ended March 31,
(Dollars in thousands)                    2022                       2021
Net income (loss)                  $      (13,923)                $ 12,716
Adjustments:
Net interest expense                       12,170                    8,786
Share-based compensation                    1,658                    1,602

Depreciation and amortization               3,761                    5,243

Equity method investment loss                 344                        -
Non-operating income                       (1,666)                    (207)
Income tax expense (benefit)               (4,229)                   3,444
Adjusted EBITDA                    $       (1,885)                $ 31,584

Adjusted EBITDA margin                       (1.5)  %                 35.2  %

Unaudited pro forma condensed consolidated financial information

The following unaudited pro-forma condensed consolidated statement of operations
information reflects the adoption of ASU 2016-13 as of January 1, 2021.
Management has made significant estimates and assumptions in its determination
of the pro-forma accounting adjustments based on certain currently available
information and certain assumptions and methodologies that we believe are
reasonable and consistent with US GAAP. Management believes the pro-forma
financial information is a useful supplemental measure to assist management and
investors in analyzing the operating performance of the business and provide
greater transparency into the results of operations of our core business.



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Three months completed March 31, 2021

                                                                                       Fair value          Pro-forma financial
(Dollars in thousands)                                    As reported                 adjustments              information
Revenues                                                $     89,733                $           -          $       89,733
Cost of sales:
Provision for loan losses                                     20,970                      (20,970)                      -
Change in fair value of loans receivable                           -                       35,557                  35,557
Direct marketing and other costs of sales                      6,430                            -                   6,430
Total costs of sales                                          27,400                       14,587                  41,987
Gross profit                                                  62,333                      (14,587)                 47,746
Total operating expenses                                      37,594                            -                  37,594
Operating income                                              24,739                      (14,587)                 10,152

Total other expense                                           (8,579)                           -                  (8,579)
Income before taxes                                           16,160                      (14,587)                  1,573
Income tax expense                                             3,444                       (2,940)                    504
Net income                                              $     12,716                $     (11,647)         $        1,069

Basic earnings per share                                $       0.35                $       (0.32)         $         0.03
Diluted earnings per share                              $       0.34                $       (0.31)         $         0.03

Adjusted EBITDA                                         $     31,584                $     (14,587)         $       16,997
Adjusted EBITDA margin                                          35.2   %                                             18.9     %


Free cash flow

Free cash flow (“FCF”) represents our net cash provided by operating activities, adjusted to include:

• Net write-offs – capital loans combined; and

• Capital expenditures.

The following table presents a reconciliation of the net cash provided by operating activities to the FCF for each of the periods indicated:

                                                         Three Months Ended March 31,
(Dollars in thousands)                                        2022                    2021

Net cash from operating activities(1) $49,935

        $ 31,880
Adjustments:
Net charge-offs - combined principal loans                 (59,793)                 (22,632)
Capital expenditures                                        (6,277)                  (3,383)
FCF                                               $        (16,135)                $  5,865


 _________

(1) Net cash from operating activities includes net charges – combined finance costs.



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Net charges and net change in fair value

We break out our total change in fair value into two separate items-first, the
amount related to net charge-offs, and second, net change in fair value needed
to adjust the current period fair value mark from the fair value mark from the
beginning of the reporting period. We believe this presentation provides more
detail related to the components of our total change in fair value when
analyzing the gross margin of our business.

Net charge-offs.  Net charge-offs comprise gross charge-offs offset by
recoveries on prior charge-offs. Gross charge-offs include the amount of
principal and accrued interest on loans that are more than 60 days past due
(Rise and Elastic) or 120 days (Today Card), or sooner if we receive notice that
the loan will not be collected, such as a bankruptcy notice or identified fraud.
Any payments received on loans that have been charged off are recorded as
recoveries and reduce total gross charge-offs.

Net change in fair value.  The net change in fair value is the change in the
reporting period between the current period fair value mark as compared to the
beginning of period fair value mark. With all other assumptions held flat and
fair value premium associated with the combined loan portfolio, we would expect
the net change in fair value to be positive in periods of growth in the loan
portfolio and expect the net change in fair value to be negative in periods of
attrition in the loan portfolio.

                                                                                Three Months Ended March 31,
(Dollars in thousands)                                                       2022                2021 (pro-forma)(1)

Net charge-offs                                                       $        76,819          $             30,890
Net change in fair value                                                        7,340                         4,667
Total change in fair value of loans receivable                        $        84,159          $             35,557


_________

(1)We have provided pro-forma information reflecting the adoption of fair value
in the 2021 financial period to provide comparability to the 2022 financial
period. See "-Non-GAAP Financial Measures" for more information and for a
reconciliation to previously reported amounts for 2021 calculated in accordance
with US GAAP. The pro-forma fair value adjustments reflect fair value
methodology acceptable with US GAAP.

Net write-offs and additional provision for loan losses

We break out our total provision for loan losses into two separate items-first,
the amount related to net charge-offs, and second, the additional provision for
loan losses needed to adjust the combined loan loss reserve to the appropriate
amount at the end of each month based on our loan loss provision methodology. We
believe this presentation provides more detail related to the components of our
total provision for loan losses when analyzing the gross margin of our business.

Net charge-offs.  Net charge-offs comprise gross charge-offs offset by
recoveries on prior charge-offs. Gross charge-offs include the amount of
principal and accrued interest on loans that are more than 60 days past due
(Rise and Elastic) or 120 days (Today Card), or sooner if we receive notice that
the loan will not be collected, such as a bankruptcy notice or identified fraud.
Any payments received on loans that have been charged off are recorded as
recoveries and reduce total gross charge-offs.

Additional provision for loan losses.  Additional provision for loan losses is
the amount of provision for loan losses needed for a particular period to adjust
the combined loan loss reserve to the appropriate level in accordance with our
underlying loan loss reserve methodology.

                                                 Three Months Ended March 31,
(Dollars in thousands)                                       2021

Net charge-offs                                 $                      30,890
Additional provision for loan losses                                   (9,920)
Provision for loan losses                       $                      20,970


Combined loan information

The Elastic line of credit product is originated by a third-party lender,
Republic Bank, which initially provides all of the funding for that product.
Republic Bank retains 10% of the balances of all of the loans originated and
sells a 90% loan participation in the Elastic lines of credit to a third-party
SPV, Elastic SPV, Ltd. Elevate is required to consolidate Elastic SPV, Ltd. as a
VIE under US GAAP and the condensed consolidated financial statements include
revenue, losses and loans receivable related to the 90% of Elastic lines of
credit originated by Republic Bank and sold to Elastic SPV.



                                       54
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Beginning in the fourth quarter of 2018, we started licensing our Rise
installment loan brand to a third-party lender, FinWise Bank, which originates
Rise installment loans in 17 states. FinWise Bank retains 4% of the balances of
all the loans originated and sells a 96% participation to a third-party SPV, EF
SPV, Ltd. We do not own EF SPV, but we are required to consolidate EF SPV as a
VIE under US GAAP and the condensed consolidated financial statements include
revenue, losses and loans receivable related to the 96% of Rise installment
loans originated by FinWise Bank and sold to EF SPV.

Beginning in 2018, we started licensing the Today Card brand and our
underwriting services and platform to launch a credit card product originated by
CCB, which initially provides all of the funding for that product. CCB retains
5% of the credit card receivable balance of all the receivables originated and
sells a 95% participation in the Today Card credit card receivables to us. The
Today Card program began expanding in 2020.

Beginning in the third quarter of 2020, we also license our Rise installment
loan brand to an additional bank, CCB, which originates Rise installment loans
in three different states than FinWise Bank. Similar to the relationship with
FinWise Bank, CCB retains 5% of the balances of all of the loans originated and
sells the remaining 95% loan participation in those Rise installment loans to EC
SPV. We do not own EC SPV, but we are required to consolidate EC SPV as a VIE
under US GAAP and the condensed consolidated financial statements include
revenue, losses and loans receivable related to the 95% of the Rise installment
loans originated by CCB and sold to EC SPV.

The information presented in the tables below on a combined basis are non-GAAP
measures based on a combined portfolio of loans, which includes the total amount
of outstanding loans receivable that we own and that are on our balance sheets
plus outstanding loans receivable originated and owned by third parties that we
guarantee pursuant to CSO programs in which we participate. There were no new
loan originations in 2021 under our CSO programs, but we continued to have
obligations as the CSO until the wind-down of this portfolio was completed in
the third quarter of 2021. See "-Basis of Presentation and Critical Accounting
Policies-Allowance and liability for estimated losses on consumer loans."

We believe these non-GAAP measures provide investors with important information
needed to evaluate the magnitude of potential loan losses and the opportunity
for revenue performance of the combined loan portfolio on an aggregate basis. We
also believe that the comparison of the combined amounts from period to period
is more meaningful than comparing only the amounts reflected on our balance
sheet since both revenues and cost of sales as reflected in our financial
statements are impacted by the aggregate amount of loans we own and those CSO
loans we guaranteed.

Our use of total combined loans and fees receivable has limitations as an
analytical tool, and you should not consider it in isolation or as a substitute
for analysis of our results as reported under US GAAP. Some of these limitations
are:

• Rise CSO loans were originated and held by a third party lender; and

• The Rise CSO loans were funded by a third party lender and were not part of the VPC Facility.

At each of the period ends indicated, the following table presents a reconciliation of:

•Loans receivable, net and at fair value, held by the Company (which correspond to our condensed consolidated balance sheets included elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q);

•Loans receivable, net, guaranteed by the Company (as disclosed in Note 3 of our
condensed consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Quarterly
Report on Form 10-Q);

•Loans receivable combined (which we use as a non-GAAP measure); and

•Combined loan loss reserve (which we use as a non-GAAP measure).

                                       55
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                                                                                       2021                                              2022
(Dollars in thousands)                                 March 31           June 30           September 30          December 31          March 31
Company Owned Loans:
Loans receivable - principal, current, company
owned                                                $ 331,251          $ 

372,068 $466,140 $501,552 $457,259
Loans receivable – principal, overdue, company property

                                           21,678             27,231                46,730              57,207             54,060
Loans receivable - principal, total, company
owned                                                  352,929            399,299               512,870             558,759            511,319
Loans receivable - finance charges, company
owned                                                   21,393             19,157                22,960              23,602             22,991
Loans receivable - company owned                       374,322            418,456               535,830             582,361            534,310
Allowance for loan losses on loans receivable,
company owned(5)                                       (39,037)           (40,314)              (56,209)            (71,204)                 -
Fair value adjustment, loans receivable-
principal                                                    -                  -                     -                   -             49,844
Loans receivable, net, company owned / Loans
receivable at fair value                             $ 335,285          $ 378,142          $    479,621          $  511,157          $ 584,154
Third Party Loans Guaranteed by the Company:
Loans receivable - principal, current,
guaranteed by company                                $     145          $   

$17 – $ – $ – Loans receivable – principal, past due, company guaranteed

                                       15                  4                     -                   -                  -
Loans receivable - principal, total,
guaranteed by company(1)                                   160                 21                     -                   -                  -
Loans receivable - finance charges, guaranteed
by company(2)                                               22                  4                     -                   -                  -
Loans receivable - guaranteed by company                   182                 25                     -                   -                  -
Liability for losses on loans receivable,
guaranteed by company                                     (122)                (7)                    -                   -                  -
Loans receivable, net, guaranteed by
company(3)                                           $      60          $      18          $          -          $        -          $       -
Combined Loans Receivable(3):
Combined loans receivable - principal, current       $ 331,396          $ 372,085          $    466,140          $  501,552          $ 457,259
Combined loans receivable - principal, past
due                                                     21,693             27,235                46,730              57,207             54,060
Combined loans receivable - principal                  353,089            399,320               512,870             558,759            511,319
Combined loans receivable - finance charges             21,415             19,161                22,960              23,602             22,991
Combined loans receivable                            $ 374,504          $ 418,481          $    535,830          $  582,361          $ 534,310
Combined Loan Loss Reserve(3):
Allowance for loan losses on loans receivable,
company owned(5)                                     $ (39,037)         $ 

(40,314) ($56,209) ($71,204) $ – Liability for losses on loans receivable, guaranteed by the company

                                     (122)                (7)                    -                   -                  -
Combined loan loss reserve(5)                        $ (39,159)         $ 

(40,321) ($56,209) ($71,204) $ – Combined Loans Receivable – Principal, Overdue(3)

                                               $  21,693          $  

27,235 $46,730 $57,207 $54,060
Combined loans receivable – principal(3)

               353,089            399,320               512,870             558,759            511,319
Percentage past due(1)                                       6  %               7  %                  9  %               10  %              11  %
Combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of
combined loans receivable(3)(4)(5)                          10  %              10  %                 11  %               12  %               -  %
Allowance for loan losses as a percentage of
loans receivable - company owned(5)                         10  %              10  %                 11  %               12  %               -  %
Fair value adjustment, combined loans
receivable- principal(6)                             $  44,458          $  

51,078 $50,036 $57,184 $49,844

Combined loans receivable at fair value(6)             418,962            469,559               585,866             639,545            584,154
Fair value as a percentage of combined loans
receivable- principal(3)(6)                                113  %             113  %                110  %              110  %             110  %


_________
(1)Represents loans originated by third-party lenders through the CSO programs,
which are not included in our condensed consolidated financial statements. The
wind-down of the CSO program was completed in the third quarter of 2021.
(2)Represents finance charges earned by third-party lenders through the CSO
programs, which are not included in our condensed consolidated financial
statements. The wind-down of the CSO program was completed in the third quarter
of 2021.
(3)Non-GAAP measure
(4)Combined loan loss reserve as a percentage of combined loans receivable is
determined using period-end balances.
(5)Effective January 1, 2022, upon the election to carry the loan portfolio at
fair value, a combined loan loss reserve and allowance for loan losses is no
longer required as a loan loss assumption has been included in the fair value
assumptions for the loan portfolio.
(6)The periods of March 31, 2021 to December 31, 2021 include pro-forma
adjustments reflecting the combined loans receivable at fair value consistent
with a fair value methodology acceptable with U.S. GAAP.





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COMPONENTS OF OUR OPERATING RESULTS

Revenue

Our revenues are composed of Rise finance charges and CSO fees (inclusive of
finance charges attributable to the participation in Rise installment loans
originated by FinWise Bank and CCB), cash advance fees attributable to the
participation in Elastic lines of credit that we consolidate, finance charges
and fee revenues related to the Today Card credit card product (inclusive of
finance charges attributable to the participations in the credit card
receivables originated by CCB), and marketing and licensing fees received from
third-party lenders related to the Rise, Rise CSO, Elastic, and Today Card
products. See "-Overview" above for further information on the structure of
Elastic.

Cost of sales

Change in Fair value. Beginning January 1, 2022, we elected the fair value
option for our loans receivable portfolio. As such, loans receivable are carried
at fair value in the Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets with changes in fair
value recorded in the Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations. To derive
the fair value, we generally utilize discounted cash flow analyses that factor
in estimated losses and prepayments over the estimated duration of the
underlying assets. Loss and prepayment assumptions are determined using
historical loss data and include appropriate consideration of recent trends and
anticipated future performance. Future cash flows are discounted using a rate of
return that we believe a market participant would require.

Provision for loan losses. Prior to January 1, 2022, provision for loan losses
consists of amounts charged against income during the period related to net
charge-offs and the additional provision for loan losses needed to adjust the
loan loss reserve to the appropriate amount at the end of each month based on
our loan loss methodology.

Direct marketing costs.  Direct marketing costs consist of online marketing
costs such as sponsored search and advertising on social networking sites, and
other marketing costs such as purchased television and radio advertising and
direct mail print advertising. In addition, direct marketing cost includes
affiliate costs paid to marketers in exchange for referrals of potential
customers. All direct marketing costs are expensed as incurred.

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Louis and Triplett will challenge the ranking pens at the PBR World Finals

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PUEBLO, Colo. — Montana cowboys Dakota Louis and Matt Triplett are back.

The duo will be among 45 bull riders who will compete in next week’s PBR World Finals and $1 Million Bonus at Dickies Arena in Fort Worth from May 13-22, the organization announced. They will join a bullpen of more than 100 cattle athletes selected to do battle in the season’s culminating event.

Louis is coming off the regular season finale with a stellar performance at Billings last weekend. Louis is 22nd in the world while Triplett is 27th. Joao Ricardo Vieira is No. 1 and at 37, he is trying to become the oldest to win a PBR world title.

Alongside the riders, the league’s fiercest bulls will also compete for the honor of 2022 YETI PBR World Champion and the $100,000 bonus that comes with it.

The 2022 YETI PBR World Champion bull will be the animal with the highest average bull score in his 6 highest rated regular season outings and two outings in the PBR World Finals.

The top bucking bulls competing in the final will receive three outs, and contenders for world champions can drop their lowest score to Fort Worth.

The 2022 PBR Global Finals will also nominate a Finals “Built for the Wild” YETI bull, who will receive a $25,000 bonus for posting the highest combined score based on his three outs in the culminating event of the final. season.

Reigning YETI PBR World Champion Bull Woopaa and Ridin Solo will compete in the event tied for first in the world, each finishing the regular season with an impressive world average of 46.29 points. They lead No. 3 contender Pookie Holler by 0.5 points.

In a dramatic end to the regular season campaign, as the final event approached in Billings, Montana, Woopaa held a 0.08-point lead over then-No. 2 Ridin Solo. While neither other were originally planned, equity entrepreneur Cord McCoy made the last-minute decision to enter Ridin Solo into the Treasure State event.

Recording two outs, Ridin Solo was able to tie Woopaa for first place in the standings when he posted a score of 46.25 points in the championship round after throwing Cody Jesus in 5.5 seconds.

Throughout 2022, Woopaa resisted 11 times on the elite Unleash The Beast, while Ridin Solo was a Road Warrior completing 13 trips on the first series.

Woopaa led the PBR in YETI “Built for the Wild” Bull of the Event honors, leading featherweight at five events including Duluth, GA, Oklahoma City, Arlington, Texas for the 2022 PBR Global Cup USA, Glendale , Arizona and Tulsa, Oklahoma. Hot on Woopaa’s hooves, Ridin Solo won the accolade three times, leading the pack in St. Louis, Little Rock, Arkansas and Everett, Washington.

During the regular season, 24 bull scores of 46 points or more were recorded. Woopaa recorded five, including three for 46.5 points or more. Woopaa’s best score so far in 2022 came in Oklahoma City when he scored 46.75 points for his 4.14 seconds on the job against Austin Richardson.

Ridin Solo recorded five matching scores of 46 or more points, including the bull’s best score of the season, scored a Little Rock best PBR of 47.5 points when he beat Dalton Kasel in 4.65 seconds.

As for the other sires, Moonlight Party, who is tied for 4th in the standings, will be looking to become the first Canadian-born bovine athlete to be crowned the PBR World Champion sire at the 2022 PBR World Finals.

Moonlight Party, which was bred by Allan Shields and then bought by Outlaw Buckers in Western Canada, now represents Gene Owen’s Oklahoma team. In his first full season in the first series, Moonlight Party held off 10 times, finishing the regular season with a world average of 45.63 points, 0.66 points off first place.

The striking bovine turned heads earlier in the season in Milwaukee, Wis., posting what is now the third best score of the season by beating Kasel in 1.67 seconds, a career high for Moonlight Party at 47 points.

Although not in contention for a World Championship, Moonlight Party will be joined by several other bulls with nationwide ties including Happy Camper, Gaume Farms Stickin ‘n’ Movin and Norse God who still call Canada home.

The other 10 active YETI PBR World Champion Bull Race Top 10 contenders who will compete in the Global Finals are: #3 Pookie Holler (average 45.79 points | -0.5 points); Juju n°4T (average of 45.63 points | -0.66 points); JAG Metals Grand Theft (average of 45.63 points | -0.66 points); Charmer n°10 (average of 45.13 points | -1.16 points).

As an added layer of excitement, ABBI (American Bucking Bull Inc.) will be pitting approximately 40 bulls in Round 1 and 20 bulls in Round 6 of the 2022 PBR World Finals when the top 3- and 4-year-old up-and- upcoming bulls will compete against the best riders in the country. These four-legged athletes will compete for a purse estimated at more than $45,000, of which $11,500 will be awarded to the top performers in the two rounds of competition.

Cattle to watch include the current ABBI Classic Cool Whip #1 bull (Julian / Staci Addison / D&H Cattle / Crooked W); Little Rock and Tulsa ABBI Classic Champion Blue Duck (Cord McCoy/Grin/Jacobson/Davis Rodeo Ranch); and Alakazam, champion of the Fort Worth ABBI Classic.

2022 PBR World Final bulls:

happy camper (Two-Bit Bulls)

Mike’s magic (Five Star Ranch/BS Cattle)

Number of bodies (Bob and Jeri Adams/BS Cattle Co.)

lean detroit (Blake Sharp/Henry Wilson)

Mr. Wicked (Blake Sharp/Koe Wetzel/Cody O’Neil)

Vanilla ice cream (Lightning Cattle/Blake Sharp)

Mike’s pattern (Blake Sharp/High Voltage Cattle/American Spirits/Koe Wetzel)

The contractor (Cornwell Bucking Bulls/Riley Bucking Bulls/PCP Bucking Bulls)

hard work (Addi Drury/Just Trying/Diggers)

Ground Assault (Stockyards/444/Winston/Melton Bull Co.)

Soy El Fuego (Winston/Melton/Stockyards Pro Rodeo)

Child Knapper (Phillips/Cooper/Scrugs Bucking Bulls)

Dr. X (Universal Pro Rodeo/Pepper/Freeman Cattle Co.)

cowboy ninja (Universal Pro Rodeo)

fury of war (Diamond G Rodeos Inc.)

Great Whiskey (5S Bucking Bulls/Tex Brothers Ranch)

Hang ’em high (Bryan T. Smith/Nathan Doss)

Gaume Fermes Stickin’n’Movin (Eno Bucking Bulls)

Long-haul (Evan Matthews)

Take risks (Frihauf Cattle Co.)

crossing (Bucking Bulls Shuler)

little train 2 (Jane Clark/Gene Owen)

moonlight party (Jane Clark/Gene Owen)

caspar (Crescent City Bucking Bulls/Lari Crane/Gene Owen)

Road test (Jane Clark/Gene Owen)

american mobster (Jane Clark/Gene Owen)

Hawk Eye (Jane Clark/Gene Owen)

Eddie Hawk (Lari Crane/Gene Owen)

norse god (Wild Hoggs Bucking Bulls)

Juju (Tommy Julian/D&H Cattle)

Upper shelf (P. Ro Ranch/OK Corralis/Gordon/D&H Cattle)

cherry bomb (Flinn/D&H Cattle Co.)

Chiselled (Flinn/D&H Cattle Co.)

Charmer (D&H Cattle Co./Buck Cattle Co.)

JAG Metals Grand Theft (D&H Cattle Co./Philip Elkins)

liston (P.Ro Ranch/Lone Star/Adams/D&H Cattle)

Manaba (Joe and Nina Webb/Julian/D&H Cattle Co.)

Arkansas (D&H Cattle Co.)

HomeBru (D&H Cattle Co./Buck Cattle Co.)

Black & Blue (OK Corralis/Gordon/D&H Cattle)

night falcon (Martinez Bucking Bulls, LLC)

born for sin (Martinez Bucking Bulls, LLC)

The sweat lodge testified (Martinez/Rockin T/T-Ray Bulls)

mule train (Martinez/Porter Cattle Co.)

The big one (Davis Rodeo Ranch)

Walk with your head held high (Davis Rodeo Ranch)

Mr. Clean (Julio Moreno/Equistride)

hi bartender (JQH Bucking Bulls/Skip & Elaine Jones)

Picture 8 (Paradigm Bull Company)

Marquis Metal Works Rouge Clark (Paradigm Bull Co./Wentz)

Chickasaw (Fabulous IV Ranch/Josh & Dalton Walling)

Hostage (Hart Cattle Co./Hale/Randy Wood)

ounces (TNT Bucking Bulls/Hart Cattle Co.)

I’m too legit (Hart Cattle Co./Hale)

wicked dreams (TNT Bucking Bulls/Hart Cattle Co.)

Montana Jacket (Berg/Coleman/Ogden/Hart)

Border crisis (Hart Cattle Co./Hale)

Bread basket (TNT Bucking Bulls/Hart Cattle Co.)

hundred bad days (TNT Bucking Bulls/Hart Cattle Co.)

gangster bones (Hart Cattle Company)

Tuff Jersey (McClellan/Lidgard/Hart)

Wizard (TNT Bucking Bulls/Hart Cattle Co.)

crystal fox (Hart Cattle Co./Diggers Bucking Bulls)

US Border Patrol (Hale/Berryman/Ogden/Hart)

First try (Hart Cattle Co./Farris)

Dixieland Delight (Hart Cattle Company)

show me buddy (Jo-Z Bucking Bulls/KC/Spark-lin Acres)

big black (KC Bucking Bulls/Joe and Nina Webb)

child of preachers (KC Bucking Bulls/RD Cattle)

Magic potion (KC Bucking Bulls/Daniels Cattle Co.)

Apper’s Mind Monster (Jo-Z Bucking Bulls/KC Bucking Bulls/Spark-Lin Acres)

nervous wreckage (CG Bucking Bulls/Big Rafter Rodeo)

sole survivor (Whitman Bucking Bulls/Jenkins Cattle Co.)

black ice (BMC Bucking Bulls/Jenkins Cattle Co.)
malaka (Jenkins Cattle Co.)

Buffalo Heifer (Lucas Manning Bucking Bulls)

Satan’s seed (Lucas Manning Bucking Bulls)

woopa (Barker Bulls/Hookin’W Ranch)

Marciano (Hookin’W Ranch)

Overview (XTB Cattle/Marty Foutch)

Harold’s real risk (M Rafter E Bucking Bulls)

thriller (Cordon McCoy/Pioneer Bulls)

Diddy Wa Diddy (Cordon McCoy/Bill McCarty)

ride solo (Cordon McCoy/Bill McCarty)

Terroir (Cord McCoy/Chad Reese)

Outlaw (Cordon McCoy/Big Sky Bulls, LLC)

It hurts so much (Cordon McCoy/David Wolfe)

Shock Tease (Cordon McCoy/BuzzBallz LLC)

rodeo thug (Garcia Rodeo Bulls/Farris/Hart Cattle Co.)
Dennis threatens her (Viducic Bucking Bulls/White Trash Buckers)

Expressway (Classic Jack Cattle/Bucking Bulls Viducic)

Sling lead (Viducic Bucking Bulls/Wyatt Bridge)

rear jack (Dakota Rodeo/Chad Berger)

Celestial Harbor (Wilks Ranch/Clay Struve/Dakota Rodeo/Chad Berger)

WSM Trail of Tears (WSM Auctioneers/Clay Struve/Dakota Rodeo/Chad Berger)

Oil Field Outlaw Yellow Feather (Bucking Bulls by Chad Berger/Oilfield Outlaw)

Mr. Winston (Dakota Rodeo/Mark Baker/Clay Struve/Chad Berger)

Jive Turkey from WSM (WSM Auctioneers/Clay Struve/Dakota Rodeo/Chad Berger)

Safety meeting (Hruby/Kainz/Clay Struve/Dakota Rodeo/Chad Berger)

Pookie Holler (Dakota Rodeo/Brian & Ashley Pintar/Clay Struve/Chad Berger)

Draco (Jeb Fredericks/Dakota Rodeo/Chad Berger)

Bubba G (Dakota Rodeo/Brian & Ashley Pintar/Clay Struve/Chad Berger)

WSM Wicked Wishes (WSM Auctioneers/Clay Struve/Dakota Rodeo/Chad Berger)

Dagger (Dakota Rodeo/Chad Berger)

(Editor’s note: PBR media information contributed to this story)

NASA Scientists Begin Studying 50-Year-Old Apollo 17 Frozen Moon Samples

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A frozen moon rock from Apollo 17 during processing at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. (Image credit: NASA/Robert Markowitz)

NASA scientists have begun studying 50-year-old samples of the moon’s surface that were collected during the agency’s last crewed moon landing mission, Apollo 17.

In March this year, NASA scientists opened a lunar sample collected during Apollo 17 and stored in 1972. The sample had sat in a freezer for decades at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, but was recently made its way to the agency’s Goddard spaceflight. Installation in Maryland, where researchers began to examine it. NASA aims for this work to support future lunar sample studies taking place with its new crewed lunar landing program, known as Artemis.

“By doing this work, we’re not just facilitating the exploration of Artemis, but we’re facilitating future sample return and human exploration in the rest of the solar system,” said planetary scientist and engineer Julie Mitchell. NASA, which leads the Artemis conservation team at Johnson, said in a statement.

“I feel very privileged to contribute in this small way by developing the capabilities for us to collect these materials, bring them home safely, and store them for the long term,” Mitchell added.

Related: NASA opens 50-year-old moon rock sample

Delicate logistics

Getting Apollo 17 moon samples from the NASA site in Texas to Maryland took years.

“We started this in early 2018, and we had to overcome a lot of technical challenges to get here,” Mitchell said. She added that moving these valuable and fragile samples serves as a rehearsal on how to handle and move future lunar samples. “It was seen as a practice to prepare a facility for future cold sample processing,” Mitchell said.

Before leaving for Goddard, the samples had to be processed while remaining frozen. They were handled with thick gloves in a transparent box in a walk-in freezer kept at minus 4 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 20 degrees Celsius). Managing these harsh and frigid conditions is important in preparing the team to collect future samples from Artemis.

“Being able to preserve frozen samples will be important for Artemis, as astronauts can potentially return ice samples from the moon’s south pole,” the NASA statement read.

Related: How NASA’s Artemis Moon Landing Works With Astronauts

Three scientists process frozen Apollo 17 samples in a walk-in freezer. (Image credit: NASA/Robert Markowitz)

“Everything we do involves a lot of logistics and a lot of infrastructure, but the addition of cold makes it a lot more difficult,” said Ryan Zeigler, Apollo sample curator at Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Division. NASA to Johnson, in the same statement.

“This is an important learning lesson for Artemis, because being able to process samples in the cold will be even more important for the Artemis mission than for Apollo,” Johnson added. “This work gives us some lessons learned and a good step forward for Artemis.”

Once processed, the samples were separated and shipped to Goddard “in a cooler with dry ice”, before being stored in a new secure freezer, according to the release.

Mysteries of the Moon

It may seem that we have learned all there is to learn from samples collected over 50 years ago. But NASA scientists have explained why they were so excited to explore these Apollo 17 rocks.

For example, previous research has found amino acids in lunar samples. As amino acids are essential for life as we know it on Earth, exploring this further could help scientists better understand how life originated not just on Earth, but possibly elsewhere in the solar system.

“We believe that some of the amino acids in lunar soils may have formed from precursor molecules, which are smaller, more volatile compounds such as formaldehyde or hydrogen cyanide,” said Jamie Elsila, a researcher at the Goddard’s Astrobiology Analysis Laboratory. volatile organic compounds, said in the release.

“Our research goal is to identify and quantify these small volatile organic compounds, as well as all amino acids, and use the data to understand the moon’s prebiotic organic chemistry,” Elsila said.

Related: 7 theories about the origin of life

Samples like these can also help scientists piece together the moon’s history, Natalie Curran, principal investigator of the Mid Atlantic Noble Gas Research Lab at Goddard, said in the same statement. Curran’s goal is to explore lunar samples and determine what the pieces of the moon may have endured over their lifetime.

“Our work allows us to use noble gases, such as argon, helium, neon and xenon, to measure how long a sample is exposed to cosmic rays, and this can help us understand the story of this sample,” Curran said. “Cosmic rays can damage organic matter that may be in a sample, so understanding the duration helps determine what effects the exposure has had on the organic matter.”

Curran then reflected on what it’s like to be able to study pieces of the moon here on Earth.

“When you think about how these samples came from another world, how far they traveled, and what solar system history they preserved inside, it always amazes me” , she said.

Email Chelsea Gohd at [email protected] or follow her on Twitter @chelsea_gohd. Follow us on twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

Whitehorse Glacier Bears race to qualify for Canada Summer Games – Yukon News

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Some competitors at a local swim meet last weekend are hoping to compete at the national level this summer.

The Yukon Invitational Championship swim meet was held April 29-30 at the Canada Games Center in Whitehorse.

Mia Barrault, 17, of the Whitehorse Glacier Bears Swim Club touched the wall under the watchful eyes of officials to mark the end of her run in the 400-meter freestyle timed finals on April 30. (Dana Hatherly/Yukon News)

Swimmers from the Whitehorse Glacier Bears Swim Club competed in the timed finals of freestyle, backstroke, breaststroke, butterfly and medley.

Sabine Keesey was one of the athletes who raced against the clock in hopes of qualifying for the Niagara 2022 Canada Summer Games which take place August 6-21.

Thirteen-year-old Sabine Keesey of the Whitehorse Glacier Bears Swim Club raced against the clock April 30 in an effort to qualify for her first Canada Summer Games.  (Dana Hatherly/Yukon News)

Thirteen-year-old Sabine Keesey of the Whitehorse Glacier Bears Swim Club raced against the clock April 30 in an effort to qualify for her first Canada Summer Games. (Dana Hatherly/Yukon News)

“Most of my events have been pretty exciting,” she said after competing in the 100-metre butterfly timed finals. “I think it’s going very well.”

Eleven competition records and four club records were broken at the event, meet manager Fraser Pearce said in an email after the April 30 competition.

A Whitehorse Glacier Bears Swim Club teammate joined the cheers of 11-year-old Cody Hirsch in the timed 400-meter freestyle finals on April 30.  (Dana Hatherly/Yukon News)

A Whitehorse Glacier Bears Swim Club teammate joined the cheers of 11-year-old Cody Hirsch in the timed 400-meter freestyle finals on April 30. (Dana Hatherly/Yukon News)

Contact Dana Hatherly at [email protected]

Swim

Lime Price Rise: Haunted by Life’s Unexpected Icebergs

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There were additions to the shopping list that needed to be made when I married my husband. His requests were simple: please always have tortillas, pinto beans, cheese and limes in the kitchen. With these ingredients, hunger could be relieved. Let’s make quesadillas, bean and cheese burritos, and with cheap meat, tacos drizzled with lime juice.

Over the past decade, there have always been fluctuations in the price of Key Limes at our local grocery store. You can grab them from bags, or you can stand side by side with an abuelita and watch her grab some, throw others, and do your best to imitate her when you throw your lemon picks into a bag in plastic.

Sometimes it was 16 limes for a dollar. Sometimes it was 20 for a dollar. Sometimes you only picked 10, because who would use them all before they went bad? Then your kids developed a taste for lime and you were back to full load for a buck. It was not a question; you just bought the limes.

Once a teenage girl came bounding up to me as I passed her with my bag of hand-picked limes to ask her how much they cost per lime. I told him that I didn’t remember. I came home and shared it with my husband. “It’s a staple; you just get the limes,” my husband said. It was a brief measure of our privilege.

For the first time, it was seven limes for a dollar. I pointed it out while we were shopping and our eyes met over our kids’ heads.

We had seen the price of meat rise steadily; bacon is also a morning staple for us. Even the cheap cuts have gone up. Cuts like the tongue, where I hunted my gringo friends to try just one as a novelty, friends who usually realized with this taco that they could overcome handling a recognizable part of the cow if it was tasty enough. Just two or three years ago, the language was something you could get for $15-$18. Now it’s closer to 30.

Before shopping, we had driven through town, marveling at the low level of inventory at car dealerships. My husband speculated that prices might stay high for cars. “At least we don’t need it,” he said, and I shouted. “You bring this back right now, or the car will hear you,” I said.

There are different reports on the economy, but as a millennial, I’m haunted by the turns it takes to stay afloat. Much like an infamous iceberg, there are things lurking in the currents that can be entirely beyond your control and threaten to sink you. A car accident for which you are not responsible. A diagnosis of cancer. Unexpected complications during childbirth.

The bill for my daughter’s birth was more than the cost of our house.

Increasingly, it feels like fundamental participation in the American economy is a cudgel to keep us tied to systems, ideologies, and ways of life that are out of step with how humans thrive. . It’s no surprise that being in charge ends with more millennials having no children by plan, but perhaps more by accident. Nor is it surprising that the things that were essential to living in America are out of reach, even for those who may have only basic privileges and just a dream for many who can’t. – not even be.

Cassie McClure is a writer, millennial, and die-hard Oxford Comma fan. She can be contacted at [email protected].

Scientists Begin Studying 50-Year-Old Frozen Apollo 17 Samples

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A frozen Apollo 17 sample being processed in a nitrogen purged glove box at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. The sample is one of many studied under the ANGSA program. Credit: NASA/Robert Markowitz

Scientists at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, recently received lunar surface samples that have been stored in a freezer at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston since Apollo 17 astronauts brought them back to Earth in December 1972.

This research is part of the Apollo Next Generation Sample Analysis Program, or ANGSA, an effort to study samples returned from the Apollo program ahead of upcoming Artemis missions to the moon’s South Pole.

However, the process of passing samples from Johnson to researchers at Goddard, as well as researchers at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley, the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D.C., and the University of arizona, Tucson, was not easy. . It’s a process that began more than four years ago when NASA’s Julie Mitchell and her Artemis conservation team at Johnson began designing and modernizing a facility to process frozen samples from Apollo 17. It’s This was a new approach and the scientists were excited to employ a technique that could be applied to future lunar missions.

“We started this in early 2018 and had to overcome a lot of technical challenges to get here,” Mitchell said. “It was seen as a practice to prepare a facility for future cold sample processing.”

“By doing this work, we are not only facilitating the exploration of Artemis, but we are facilitating future sample return and human exploration in the rest of the solar system,” Mitchell added. “I feel very privileged to be contributing in this small way by developing the capabilities for us to collect these materials, bring them home safely, and store them for the long term.”

Once the facility was ready, Ryan Zeigler, curator of Apollo samples in Johnson’s Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) division, and his team had to adapt to the unique conditions Mitchell’s team designed to maintain samples frozen during processing, which included reduced visibility due to freezing and difficulty handling samples while working with thick gloves in a nitrogen purged glove box, all in a walk-in freezer kept at minus 4 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 20 C). Being able to keep samples frozen will be important for Artemis, as astronauts could return ice samples from the moon’s south pole.






Scientists at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, recently received lunar surface samples that have been stored in a freezer at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston since Apollo 17 astronauts brought them back to Earth in December 1972. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

“Everything we do involves a lot of logistics and a lot of infrastructure, but the addition of cold makes it much more difficult,” Zeigler said. “This is an important learning lesson for Artemis, because being able to process samples in the cold will be even more important for the Artemis mission than for Apollo. This work gives us some lessons learned and a good step forward for Artemis.”

After the frozen samples were processed and subdivided at Johnson by Lunar Sample Processor Jeremy Kent, the samples were then express-shipped in a cooler with dry ice, immediately opened at Goddard and stored in a secure freezer. . For the scientists currently working with the treasures, there’s something special about receiving samples that haven’t been studied for nearly five decades.

Jamie Elsila, a research scientist at Goddard’s Astrobiology Analysis Laboratory, focuses on studying small volatile organic compounds for her research and sample analysis. Previous research has shown that some lunar samples contain amino acids, which are essential for life on Earth. His team wants to understand their origin and distribution in the solar system.

“We think some of the amino acids in lunar soils may have formed from precursor molecules, which are smaller, more volatile compounds such as formaldehyde or hydrogen cyanide,” Elsila said. “Our research goal is to identify and quantify these small volatile organic compounds, as well as all amino acids, and use the data to understand the moon’s prebiotic organic chemistry.”

Natalie Curran, principal investigator for the Mid Atlantic Noble Gas Research Lab at Goddard, focuses on understanding the history the samples may have had during their life on the moon. The Moon’s surface is a harsh environment, and unlike Earth, it has no atmosphere to protect it from exposure to space.

“Our work allows us to use noble gases, such as argon, helium, neon and xenon, to measure how long a sample is exposed to cosmic rays, and this can help us understand the story of this sample,” Curran said. “Cosmic rays can damage organic matter that may be in a sample, so understanding the duration helps determine the effects the exposure has had on the organic matter.”

Scientists Begin Studying 50-Year-Old Frozen Apollo 17 Samples

Three ARES scientists process frozen Apollo 17 samples inside a walk-in freezer kept at minus 4 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 20 C). Under the lab coat, they put on parkas, gloves and hats to keep warm. Credit: NASA/Robert Markowitz

Elsila and Curran are in possession of frozen and unfrozen lunar samples. When these samples were brought to Earth, part was stored at room temperature and another part was frozen, allowing comparison between the two groups. Scientists will analyze the two sets of samples to determine if there are any differences in organic content. Understanding all of the variations caused by different preservation methods could inform future decisions about how to store samples returned by Artemis astronauts, part of what Johnson’s ARES team will do.

For Elsila, “it’s very cool to think about all the work that went into collecting the samples on the moon, and then all the foresight and care that went into preserving them so that we could analyze them at this time,” she noted.

As for Curran, “when you think about how these samples came from another world, how far they traveled, and what solar system history they preserved inside, it makes me wonder. always amazes,” she added.


NASA Goddard teams to study unopened Apollo samples


More information:
Learn more about how NASA studies samples from Apollo and other celestial bodies at:

https://ares.jsc.nasa.gov

Provided by NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

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Helix enables banking as a service for fintechs

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Helix by Q2 provides highly flexible banking as a service (BaaS) to fintech companies that have developed innovative services and then decided to offer a bespoke banking component as well.

Helix’s clients include clients such as Acorns, Betterment, Credit Karma, Empower, Gusto, and M1.

“Our focus is on how we help these companies create unique products inside of what they already do,” said Ahon Sarkar, CEO of Helix in Q2. “They’re solving different problems for different demographics, and we’re moving from one size fits all to differentiated products built around people.”

The products that Helix by Q2 can offer include the building blocks of banking – accounts, cards, payments, data and controls, administration tools and monetization solutions – to facilitate the integration of personalized financial experiences.

For example, Gusto realized that the #1 problem many employees faced was managing cash flow and the #2 problem was building up savings. So they worked with Helix and launched Gusto Wallet – a way for employees to withdraw from their next paycheck for free instead of having to pay exorbitant interest to payday lenders. Gusto also launched an emergency savings product to help its customers save, which many users have accomplished for the first time.

Betterment, a pioneering robo-advisor (or digital wealth advisor in their marketing parlance), helps users create and maintain portfolios through its automated investment platforms. When customers wanted a way to spend the money that was in their Betterment account and maximize the return on the money they weren’t going to spend, Betterment partnered with Helix to launch a checking account alongside automated scanning functionality.

The checking account and debit card are provided by nbkc bank, originally the National Bank of Kansas City, which is a member of the FDIC and both a local brick-and-mortar bank and a national online bank .

Helix debuted about 10 years ago as Smartypig, a goal-based savings product, Sarkar said, with a very light banking core. It was rebranded as Social Money and later acquired by Q2 which markets itself as a leading provider of digital transformation solutions for banking and lending.

“Then, we [at Helix] realized that this kernel was more interesting than the products we built on it. We started to focus on customization. Everyone [in banking] was this one size fits all and we realized through our fintech partnerships that if you can actually customize the product for each user and give them progression, you see greater retention.

They started with payments, then goal-based savings, investing, money management with Credit Karma, and wealth management with Betterment.

“Now we’ll see people in loans, insurance, markets and games – concentric circles of adoption,” Sarkar said. “People are ready to adopt brand new technology that they have never seen before if someone in an adjacent industry has had success with it and they can figure out how to apply it.”

Helix expects announcements from new customers in these areas soon.

Credit Karma used Helix to provide banking services to its users. The company, known for providing credit ratings and advice on credit products, was acquired by Intuit in late 2020.

Credit Karma had up to 14 years of an individual member’s credit history – the amount they borrowed, their credit score, missed payments, and the amount of credit they used.

“We only had one aspect of a member’s financial life – borrowing and paying,” said Poulomi Damany, senior vice president and general manager of assets and tax at Credit Karma. But with Intuit and TurboTax, it could access the other side of the ledger for a member who used the tax preparation service and granted Credit Karma permission to access income information.

Equipped with detailed credit information about its users, Credit Karma considered the idea of ​​offering banking services. Three and a half years ago, it decided to test the market by offering a high-yield savings account to its members, using Helix and MVB Bank, Inc.

“People trust us with their credit data, will they also trust us with their money?”

The answer was yes they would, so about a year ago Credit Karma launched a checking account as well.

“Banks make money from fees,” Damany added. “The first thing we said was that we don’t want to charge any fees for these accounts. Our goal is to help members better manage their money,” she said. “We’ve partnered with TurboTax to make [tax] refunds available sooner. If you have a refund and are depositing into a Credit Karma Money account, we will make it available five days early. We have also made reimbursement advances. You can get part of your refund as soon as the IRS accepts it.

Debit cards don’t usually offer rewards, she added, and when they do, the rewards are very limited. “We have Instant Karma. Every time you use your debit card, you can get your entire purchase refunded. The behavior we encourage is that you spend the money you have and don’t go into debt.

“Credit Karma Money wants to be the best checking account for your credit score,” Damany explained. “Our bill payment features help members stay on top of their bills. Through this, we surface bills found in a member’s credit report, as these bills are most important to their score, and let them know when their bills are available and when they are due. We go one step further by identifying the best action a member can take to reduce their debt, including how much they need to pay, what loan they need to pay, and by what dates. Members who take action are likely to see their score increase.

Another innovation is a Credit Builder account, a locked savings account that looks like a line of credit. Members pay small amounts there and this is reported to the offices as a payment on a line of credit. “It’s a line of credit, for yourself,” she said. “Every time you save, we help you build credit, and in the end, you end up with $400 to $500 in emergency savings.”

As members improve their finances, they are rewarded with early payment – ​​paychecks made available two days early and instant check cashing. New features are coming, she added.

South Korean icebreaker returns home after more than 6 months in Antarctica

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SEOUL, May 2 (Yonhap) — The South Korean icebreaker is on its way to the southeast port of Busan after completing a 195-day international exploration mission in the Antarctic Ocean, the Department of Oceans.

The Araon, South Korea’s first icebreaker vessel, launched its mission to the South Pole on October 20 last year and will return to Busan on Tuesday, the Ministry of Oceans and Fisheries said.

The 7,487 tonne research vessel explored the sea below the Eastern Thwaites Ice Shelf, one of West Antarctica’s largest ice shelves, with helicopters and devices attached to seals in part of global efforts to examine the cause of global warming and study the Antarctic ecosystem. .

Little exploration of West Antarctica has been done so far due to the difficulty of access as the melting of the Eastern Thwaites Ice Shelf accelerates, the ministry said.

An ice shelf is a huge floating ice shelf that forms where a glacier or ice cap flows toward a coastline and onto the surface of the ocean.

The Araon also examined the ecology of penguins and seals, two top predators in the Antarctic marine ecosystem, and collected seawater from West Antarctica to analyze the ocean’s capacity Antarctica to store carbon.

The ministry said the research vessel also conducted on-site exploration of the January Hunga Tonga-Hunga Ha’apai underwater volcanic eruption, the world’s first such study, to collect data. crude that could be used to shed light on a volcano eruption.

After calling at Busan, the Araon will move to the southwestern port of Gwangyang for repairs and maintenance and embark on a voyage to the North Pole in July this year, according to the ministry.

Antarctica lost an ice floe, but gained an island

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The collapse of ice shelves on the east coast of Antarctica has revealed something never seen before: a landform that could be an island. But it’s not the first newly revealed island off the Antarctic coast. A series of islands have appeared as the ice shelves along the mainland’s coastline have disintegrated in recent years.

The island is visible in all three images, which were taken by Landsat satellites between 1989 and 2022. The landform retains its shape, even though the ice around it has melted, shifted and disappeared. As the ice collapsed, scientists believe large icebergs probably crashed on the island, but the island retained its shape.

The east coast of Antarctica has lost most of the Glenzer and Conger ice shelves, as shown in these satellite images taken between November 15, 1989 and January 9, 2022. Credit: NASA GSFC/UMBC JCET.

However, scientists don’t know if there is solid earth under the mound of snow and ice.

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“It is undoubtedly similar to other ice islands, such as Bowman Island (also seen in the image above),” John Gibson, a scientist with the Australian Antarctic Division, said in a post. on NASA’s Earth Observatory. Gibson thinks the feature is likely an ice island: a large, heavy cap of ice sitting firmly on an underwater peak.

Gibson called the ice island “self-perpetuating,” which means that the snow and ice that accumulates on the surface of the island compensates for the amount of melting that occurs underwater. If this balance is disrupted by less snowfall, the ice island could thin and move away. “The unnamed island is a more or less permanent feature of the landscape,” Gibson said, “but may one day break away from the underlying rock and become an iceberg.”

NASA reports that December 2021 elevation data from the Advanced Topographic Laser Altimeter System (ATLAS) on NASA’s Ice, Cloud and Land Elevation Satellite 2 (ICESat-2) shows that at least part of the island is between 30 and 35 meters (100 to 115 feet) above the sea surface.

NASA says most of the Glenzer and Conger ice shelves are gone, after collapsing earlier this year. And with the continued collapse of Antarctica’s ice shelves due to warming oceans, more of these islands could appear.

“The discovery of more of these is expected to continue in the coming years due to shrinking glacial and sea ice,” said Christopher Shuman, a glaciologist from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, based at Goddard Space. NASA Flight Center. “Obviously these are ‘new to us’ features, but we also have more people and more tools to observe the Antarctic margins now. Several examples do not make a trend, but they imply that d Other once-hidden features are likely to be noticed in years to come.

Learn more about this landform on NASA’s Earth Observatory.

#BookReview: A New Look at Shackleton’s Expedition to Hell

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When news broke last month that the sunken wreck of Sir Ernest Shackleton’s 1915 Antarctic expedition had been found east of the Antarctic Peninsula in the Weddell Sea, it reignited the story of the legendary fight of the ship’s crew for survival.

Shackleton’s attempt to cross Antarctica was cut short when his ship, Endurance, was trapped and then crushed by ice.

The disaster left the 28 men at their mercy in the frozen South Pole, and their eventual escape is arguably the most famous adventure story in history.

Much has already been written about Shackleton. So, was it worth another book?

What perhaps makes the latest offering, Shackleton: A Biography, more meritorious is that it was written by the world’s greatest living explorer, Sir Ranulph Fiennes.

No other author could have hoped to match Fiennes’ unique authority to write about Shackleton’s expedition and the man himself – a hero for the most part but also a controversial figure.

Fiennes himself perfectly summed up his credentials for writing the last book, when he said, “To write about hell, it helps if you’ve been there.” And Fiennes has been there – often.


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Alarmism debunked: Arctic sea ice is only 3% below its 30-year average

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Arctic sea ice is just 3% below the 30-year average

Climate change alarmism debunked

Paul Joseph Watson

According to the latest report from the EU’s Earth observation programme, Arctic sea ice is only 3% below its 30-year average.

Oops, failed story!

The Daily Skeptic’s environmental editor Chris Morrison explains the data.

The red line on the left graph plots the 2021 record and it can be seen that this is an improvement from recent years. The deviations from the average in March and September shown on the right have both narrowed in recent years. Of course, in historical and geological terms, these changes are insignificant, but they are likely to dampen the generally hysterical tone about polar weather found in most climate change debates. This tone was dampened in 2009 when former US Vice President Al Gore announced that there was a good chance the North Pole would be ice-free in the summer by 2013. As for climate catastrophism, the Arctic is the gift that keeps on giving. Discussing a crackpot plan to ‘save Arctic ice’ by sprinkling it with glass, the BBC Future Planet site noted in 2020 that the region was in a ‘self-destructive feedback loop’. Much of the ice was said to be “disappearing rapidly”.

Morrison goes on to document how Arctic sea ice rose and fell over hundreds of years of historical records and long before humans began emitting carbon dioxide to any significant degree.

no

As we pointed out last year, one of the authors of the UN IPCC report that focused on the “extreme” consequences of man-made global warming hailed the fact that “people are starting to be afraid” of climate change and that it “would affect the way they vote.

However, doomsday prophecies about climate change have been proven spectacularly wrong time and time again.

According to a highly publicized 2004 report, human-induced climate change will cause “millions” of deaths, the collapse of major European cities, nuclear war and global environmental riots…all by 2020.

It never happened.

As we reported in January 2020, Glacier National Park in Montana was forced to remove all signs that read “glaciers will be all gone by 2020” after the doomsday scenario didn’t happen.

no

So-called “climate experts” have been wrong time and time again on absolutely everything, from Paul Ehrlich’s prediction of millions of starvation deaths in the 1980s, to Al Gore’s absurd claim that the Arctic would have “ice-free” summers by 2013. .

no

In the late 1970s, climate experts declared that a new ice age was coming. This does not happen.

None of this ever happens, but the same “experts” are still given platforms and vast funding to insist on lowering our standard of living, while voices of dissent are silenced by government decree, Big Tech censorship and social media algorithms.

*********

(TLB) released This article from Summit News compiled and written by Paul Joseph Watson


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Glacier National Park Announces Upcoming Artists in Residence

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Glacier National Park has announced its artists in residence for the summer of 2022 and 2023.

A total of three different artists will take part in the program this summer, and three more in the summer of 2023. The first two are Ilana Goldman and Gabriel Williams. Goldman and Williams will begin their residency in early June. The two are described in a park press release as dancers, choreographers, educators and filmmakers “who create short dance films in spectacular natural settings.”

Their work focuses on the human relationship with nature and how it influences identity. Goldman and Williams have created three short films that have screened at 30 international festivals and cinemas, and they plan to create a short dance film in Glacier National Park that will investigate human impacts on nature. “They will specifically address the plastic waste crisis, with Goldman wearing a suit made from plastic waste it generated over a four-month period,” according to a park press release. Their residency is due to end on July 1.

Starting July 5, portraitist and documentary photographer Rosalyn Gerstein will begin her residency. Gerstein’s work aims to document the relationship between people and the environment, and exhibits of his work include quotes from subject interviews, according to a park press release. During her residency, she plans to represent park stewards “who have dedicated their lives to preserving these public lands for future generations and exploring their motivation to continue this meaningful work.”

In addition to working as an artist, Gerstein has also taught art and creative expression to students ages 4 to 94, according to the press release.

Starting in June 2023, knitter and textile artist Virginia Catherall will begin her tenure as artist-in-residence. Catherall’s work is inspired by western landscapes, and she uses knitting to interpret the history, science, geography and biology of an ecosystem, according to a park press release. “Whether it’s color, texture or shape, the uniqueness of each piece makes the viewer or wearer more aware of what the objects are and why they are wearing them,” the press release reads.

In July 2023, photographer Ben Rusnak and Susan Bryant will begin their residency. Bryant rebounded from both breast cancer and traumatic brain injury. Rusnak has documented his experiences, and during their residency at Glacier, the two will collaborate with images of Rusnak and haikus by Bryant that “will encompass visitors healing from their own traumas,” a press release reads. “Their mission is to help visitors discover the transformative power of nature not only for self-preservation, but also for our national parks.”

Artists in residence will participate in public outreach programs. In the past, the programming of artist residencies took the form of demonstrations, conferences, exploratory walks or performances. Since 2006, Glacier National Park has hosted 36 different artists in residence.

The 10 Best Crash Bandicoot Games Of All Time, According To Reddit

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As Microsoft very recently acquired Activision Blizzard, this could mean that fans will see another Crash Bandicoot game in the not too distant future. Not only that, but it could also mean that the next Accident The release could be an Xbox exclusive, which is ironic considering the bandicoot started as the mascot for Sony’s first PlayStation.

RELATED: Crash N.Sane Trilogy: The 5 Best & 5 Worst Levels

the Crash Bandicoot The series has a long history with Sony consoles since its inception by Naughty Dog, and with a potential new game on the horizon, it’s worth looking back at what made them great. And Redditors were quick to debate their favorite games in the series. However, as with all long-running series, Crash Bandicoot the franchise has a few stinkers, but the fanbase is so loyal they even love them.

ten Crash Bash (2000)

While many fans think crash shot is a fun game, even despite its average reviews, it’s far from the best, but Grandmaster_Rush begs to differ. The Redditor “really loved how fun and addictive it was”. The 2000 game is made up of several mini-games, like trying to push other players out of icebergs. In fact, most levels see the player trying to push their opponents out of the game arena.

crash shot is a party video game, and like the much more famous Crash Team Racing, it’s better with more players. The game has a single-player mode, but it’s nowhere near as fun and there’s no point. It’s almost as if the beloved Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater the games consisted only of mini-games like Graffiti, Tag, and Horse.

9 Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back (1997)

Crash fleeing a bear in Crash Bandicoot 2

Rob_Highwind thinks that Crash Bandicoot 2: Cortex Strikes Back is the best game in the entire series because of its core elements. The Redditor posits, “It’s simple, has tight controls, and most importantly, it’s fun.” And though it doesn’t sound very exciting, The cortex strikes back introduced many new mechanics which made the game much less frustrating than the original.

Between double jumping, skidding, and crawling, there are new ways to kill any oncoming threats. And the Naughty Dog team also got more creative when it came to hiding secret areas. It may have the least memorable levels from the original trilogy, but it has the best feature of the three.

8 Crash Nitro Kart (2003)

Crash Nitro Kart on PS2

After one hugely successful go-kart racing game in the series, the next logical step would be to create another, and that’s exactly what happened. Follow-up development was led by Vicarious Visions this time around, and while the developer did a great job of remaking the original trilogy with 2017 N. Sane Trilogyhe clearly still had a lot to learn 19 years ago.

RELATED: 10 Game Problems That Were Turned Into Features

However, Vic-Treasuresson thinks it’s the best game in the series, and they know it’s not the answer fans are looking for when they explain that they’re “expecting pitchforks”. In fairness, the game did a decent job of mixing kart racing with traditional on-foot platforming levels, but it was nothing groundbreaking.

7 Crash Bandicoot 4: About Time (2020)

Cortex Castle in Crash Bandicoot 4

So much Crash Bandicoot the games were released in the interval between Crash Bandicoot 3: distorted and the latest published It was time that is impossible to count. And, sadly, even fans recognize the series’ downward spiral since Naughty Dog dropped it.

However, that all changed when developer Toys For Bob created Crash Bandicoot 4: About timeand he simply claimed that whatever was published after Veil did not exist. Nebrepins thinks the fourquel is so good that “Even though I love the original trilogy, Crash 4 makes them really outdated and boring. “The new game kept the tone of the first three, updated the graphics, was full of hidden Easter eggs, and is extremely difficult. “Cortex Castle” is the hardest level in the series, but it’s also one of the best.

6 Crash Bandicoot: Wrath of Cortex (2001)

Crash Bandicoot Wrath Of Cortex Cropped

After three amazing main games and the best kart racer ever who isn’t Mario KartNaughty Dog relinquished ownership and development duties were passed to Traveller’s Tales. Wrath of Cortex was the first game in the series developed by the new studio and the first to remove numbers from titles, which was likely to stop drawing attention to the series’ age. But Wrath of Cortex displayed the age of the franchise by having absolutely no new ideas in the game.

Although the game is broken, it’s still loved by a small number of people, and ThomasTheGreen not only thinks it’s the best, but they wonder why other Redditors don’t feel the same way, asking, “Where’s Wrath of Cortex…” But, in reality, the game was broken and players can literally complete “Ghost Town” without even touching the controller.

5 Crash Twinsanity (2004)

Crash Twinsanity Cortex Bees

Twinsanity was the series’ next big release after a massive three-year gap after the poorly received Wrath of Cortex. And while the 2004 game had better reception, that doesn’t mean a whole lot. The developer, Traveller’s Tales, hasn’t learned from its mistakes with Wrath of Cortex, because the 2004 version was again broken in so many areas that it was almost impossible to collect some gems. But the game still has a huge following among Bandicoot fans, and Sportakus1 loves it more than any other game in the series.

The Redditor notes, “The soundtrack is awesome, some levels are really good, and Cortex shines.” Twinsanity is the closest the Crash series has to having an open-world game, as players can freely explore a good chunk of Sanity Island. And it was also a team game, as players controlled both Crash and the evil scientist Neo Cortex. At the very least, more than any other game in the series, Twinsanity proves that Crash deserves the Netflix treatment.

4 Crash Bandicoot 3: Distorted (1998)

Some think Crash Bandicoot 3 is overrated, but Psi001 and many other users think the game isn’t just the best Accident release, but one of the best games ever made. The editor notes: “Deformed variety and even in traditional gameplay, I prefer its faster levels and move progression, not to mention awesome bosses compared to most of the other three.”

Although there was a big increase in the quality and variety of levels from the first to the second game, Crash Bandicoot 3: distorted is a sprawling epic compared to The cortex strikes back. In addition to riding tigers along the Great Wall of China, Crash rides motorcycles, pilots airplanes, and even rides dinosaurs. Not only that, but the game incorporates time travel, meaning levels can be set hundreds of years in the future, or during Dynastic or Mezasoic times.

3 Clash of the Titans (2007)

Crash of the Titans Titan Idol

The crash of the titans saw ownership change hands again, and this time it was Radical Entertainment’s turn to try and inject some new ideas into the series. Nechotik is almost afraid to share his opinion on the 2007 game. The Redditor reluctantly admits, “Please don’t hang me, but The crash of the titans. Does ANYBODY like it? It is my favorite”

RELATED: 10 games to play if you like Crash Bandicoot

The 2007 game follows Crash as he attempts to stop Cortex, who has turned the people of Wumpa Island into mutants known as “Titans”. The game lets players jump on the backs of these titans and control them, but it runs out after just a few levels, and it’s generally one of the franchise’s most hated games.

2 Crash Bandicoot (1996)

Crash Bandicoot Stands on a Course (1996)

While Crash was originally a wombat and went through many redesigns, development was eventually smoothed over and the original 1996 game was unlike any other at the time. Where the games of the other console mascots were at the forefront in terms of game mechanics, whether Super Mario or sonic the hedgehog, Crash Bandicoot was all about aesthetics.

C4-ABD sums it up best by explaining, “I love the creepiness, how evil Cortex is (not goofy and stupid), the soundtrack and how simple it is.” Featuring a soundtrack by the weird and wonderful band Devo, wandering the depths of the jungles of Sanity Beach and slowly making their way to Castle Cortex, Crash Bandicoot is a vibrant and thrilling adventure unlike any other.

1 Crash Team Racing (1999)

Crash Bandicoot racing for the finish line in Crash Team Racing for PS1

While the main series is its own type of platformer, Crash Team Racing owes a lot to his peers. The game is heavily influenced by Mario Kart and many more such games. Crash Team Racing sees players racing through familiar territory, as all race tracks are modeled after levels from the original trilogy, and players can also wield weapons that have been used against them often in all three of these games.

AbandonedBySony thinks there are no two ways and the best Accident the game is “definitely Crash Team Racing“Just like the main series, there’s a weird vibe to many of the levels, and Devo’s music is just as good as ever. And with the game’s full remake in 2019, it’s better and more popular than ever.

NEXT: 10 Craziest Glitches In The Super Mario Series

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Poles Apart – Frank McNally on New and Old Stella Cinemas and Shackleton’s Last Journey

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A gloriously restored Stella cinema in Rathmines was the ironic setting earlier this week for the world premiere of a documentary called Shackleton’s Cabin.

The film also talks about a restoration work, but of a somewhat more Spartan building: the wooden hull of the ship in which the great polar explorer Ernest Shackleton made his last voyage and in which he also died, 100 years ago. years last January.

A glorified shed, it spent most of the last century in Norway, until it was donated to the Shackleton Museum in Athy, a town which, as well as being its birthplace, also won the place death of the explorer.

It was then lovingly restored to its original condition by Connemara conservationist Sven Habermann, the film’s other hero.

But viewers watched the preview in Art Deco splendor of the new Stella, from armchairs you could sleep in, especially if you put your feet up on the leather-covered ottomans that each seat now has.

Dim lighting was provided by custom table lamps, on custom tables. And while we waited for the show to start, people were waiting for us, serving us wine and canapes.

It must have been due to a sense of guilt that while sending photos to a friend on WhatsApp I also sent a copy of the ad in the newspaper that Shackleton is supposed to have placed when looking for recruits for an expedition . You know this one: “Men wanted for hazardous journey, small salary, biting cold, long months of total darkness, constant danger, questionable safe return, honor (sic) and recognition in case of success.”

Alas, as I now realize, the announcement is a myth.

Or at least no one has found the alleged original, which is generally said to have appeared in The Times of London, despite diligent searches. The first known reference to this was in a 1944 book, long after Shackleton’s death.

This seems to have been another one of those ghost quotes that come to life on their own. But as fictional as it may be, it derives its undoubted authority from the facts of Shackleton’s ill-fated career.

It was said of the great explorers of the South Pole, and it was again during the Q&A after the screening, that if Scott and Amundsen could have been better organizers or navigators, it was Shackleton you would want by your side in case of emergency.

Judged by the ambitions he and his rivals were vying for, he was a failure. But he is perhaps best remembered now for an outstanding achievement: never losing a crew member on his travels, despite the appalling conditions he faced.

His leadership was most notoriously tested during the aptly named Endurance Expedition of 1914-1917, when the ship was crushed by ice and he, Tom Crean and others had to row 800 miles at high sea, then through the icy mountains of South Georgia. , without proper climbing gear, for help.

In contrast, Shackleton’s last voyage – a subplot of the documentary – was much less eventful, except for one point. On another trip to South Georgia, exhausted from stress and alcoholism, he suffered a fatal heart attack in his cabin in the early hours of January 5, 1922.

He was duly buried on the island, and still is. But the cabin at least now rests in Kildare.

The documentary will be broadcast on RTÉ on Monday May 2. Meanwhile, this week’s preview also made me try (and fail) to remember the last time I visited the old Stella, an entirely different experience than the current one. It wasn’t this century, and maybe not even in the 1990s. But each time it was, the place then acquired a certain infamy.

The promise of a night out at the Stella during his declining years was the movie version of Shackleton’s recruitment ad. It may not be a dangerous journey, in freezing cold, total darkness, and with a questionable safe return. Even so, it was far from comfortable.

When I took to Twitter to jog my memory, many veterans recalled the sticky mats that were its defining feature.

Someone else mentioned the rat, once seen scurrying across the floor by a friend. I remembered the rat too. He was a local celebrity at the time. Although I’ve never seen it myself, many others (or their friends) have. In the best versions, it had gone through someone’s foot.

I wonder now if the rat was also a myth. Then again, rodent infestations were hardly unheard of in the dilapidated buildings of the 1980s. And what better place to have one than in a suburb pronounced by many Dubliners and its rural apartment dwellers, as “Rat-mines” ?

Earth’s atmosphere could be a source of lunar water

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April 28, 2022

(News from Nanowerk) Hydrogen and oxygen ions escaping from Earth’s upper atmosphere and combining on the moon could be one of the known sources of lunar water and ice, according to new research by scientists at the Institute. University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysics (Scientific reports“Distribution of the aqueous phase near the poles of the Moon from gravitational aspects”).

The image shows the distribution of surface ice at the south pole (left) and north pole (right) of the moon, detected by NASA’s Moon Mineralogy Mapper instrument in 2009. Blue represents the locations of ice and the gray scale corresponds to the surface temperature. (Photo: NASA)

The work by Gunther Kletetschka, an associate research professor at the UAF Geophysical Institute, adds to a growing body of research on water at the north and south poles of the moon.

Finding water is key to NASA’s Project Artemis, the planned long-term human presence on the moon. NASA plans to return humans to the moon this decade.

“As NASA’s Artemis team plans to build a base camp at the moon’s south pole, water ions that appeared many eons ago on Earth can be used in the astronauts’ life support system. “, said Kletetschka.

The new research estimates that the moon’s polar regions could contain up to 3,500 cubic kilometers – 840 cubic miles – or more of surface permafrost or subsurface liquid water created from ions that escaped from the earth’s atmosphere. This is a volume comparable to that of Lake Huron in North America, the eighth largest lake in the world.

The researchers based this total on the lowest volume model calculation – 1% of Earth’s atmospheric exhaust reaching the moon.

It is generally believed that a majority of lunar water was deposited by asteroids and comets that collided with the moon. Most took place during a period known as the Late Heavy Bombardment. During this period, around 3.5 billion years ago, when the solar system was around 1 billion years old, it is claimed that the first inner planets and Earth’s moon suffered an unusually heavy impact. asteroids.

Scientists also hypothesize that the solar wind is a source. The solar wind carries oxygen and hydrogen ions, which may have combined and deposited on the moon as water molecules.

Now there is another way to explain how water accumulates on the moon.

The research was published March 16 in the journal Scientific Reports in an article authored by Kletetschka and co-authored by Ph.D. student Nicholas Hasson of the Geophysical Institute and Center for Water and Environmental Research at the UAF at the Institute for Northern Engineering. Several colleagues from the Czech Republic are also among the co-authors.

Kletetschka and his colleagues suggest that hydrogen and oxygen ions are swept into the moon as it passes through the tail of Earth’s magnetosphere, which it does for five days of the moon’s monthly journey around the planet. The magnetosphere is the teardrop-shaped bubble created by the Earth’s magnetic field that shields the planet from much of the continuous flux of charged solar particles.

Recent measurements by several space agencies – NASA, European Space Agency, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and Indian Space Research Organization – have revealed significant numbers of water-forming ions present during the transit of the moon through this part of the magnetosphere.

These ions have slowly accumulated since the late heavy bombardment.

The presence of the moon in the tail of the magnetosphere, called the magnetotail, temporarily affects some of the Earth’s magnetic field lines – those that are interrupted and simply recede into space for several thousand miles. Not all Earth field lines are tethered to the planet at both ends; some have only one point of attachment. Think of each of them as a string tied to a pole on a windy day.

The presence of the moon in the magnetotail causes some of these broken field lines to reconnect with their opposite broken counterpart. When this happens, hydrogen and oxygen ions that had escaped Earth rush to these reconnected field lines and are accelerated back to Earth.

The authors of the paper suggest that many of these returning ions hit the passing moon, which has no magnetosphere of its own to repel them.

“It’s like the moon is in the shower – a shower of water ions returning to Earth, falling on the moon’s surface,” Kletetschka said.

The ions then combine to form lunar permafrost. Some of this, through geological processes and other processes such as asteroid impacts, is carried below the surface, where it can become liquid water.

The research team used gravitational data from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter to study the polar regions as well as several major lunar craters. Abnormalities in subsurface measurements at impact craters indicate locations of fractured rock likely to contain liquid water or ice. Gravity measurements at these underground locations suggest the presence of ice or liquid water, the research paper states.

The latest research builds on work published in December 2020 by four of the new paper’s authors, including Kletetschka.

Photos of majestic ice caves hidden in the Canadian Rockies

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The cool blue tones of ice combined with otherworldly features, shapes and light can result in some portfolio-worthy shots. However, how to find and photograph remote ice caves safely is often the most difficult aspect of ice cave photography.

Photographer Stanley Aryanto wasn’t always obsessed with ice caves, and PetaPixel readers may recognize him as the photographer who managed to capture a comet, an aurora and the Milky Way in a single photo. His philosophy of photography, however, made researching and finding ice caves for photographing an addiction.

“I launched my photography brand, The Wicked Hunt, with the spirit of going through unconventional means to live and capture unique moments. For me, it’s not about chasing the perfect shot, it’s about the experience of travel. The photo was never the goal. It’s simply the trophy you earn for your hard work and dedication,” says Aryanto.

Having spent most of his life living in Western Australia and Indonesia, Aryanto didn’t have many opportunities to photograph in cold environments, let alone ice caves. While on a photography trip to Morocco, he met a group of Australians who had obtained Canadian work visas and were planning to move to the Canadian Rockies.

“The idea intrigued me right away, so as soon as I got home, I applied for a Canadian work visa. To my surprise, I was approved pretty quickly and started packing for my new temporary home. During my research, I discovered the photograph of Paul Zizka, and my mind was blown. I really wanted to visit the places that Paul documented so well, but thought they were probably outside my skill level. In my mind, I thought you had to be an expert mountaineer to get to some of these places that Paul documented so well,” Aryanto describes.

Ice caves in the Rockies

After arriving in Canada, Aryanto was trying his hand at astrophotography at Mount Assiniboine when he met a fellow photographer Ludovic Labbe-Doucet. After chatting all night, Aryanto learned that Labbé-Doucet had taken many courses on how to properly navigate the glaciers of the Canadian Rockies. They immediately agreed to start exploring together, with the eventual goal of finding newly revealed ice caves. In preparation, Aryanto also began taking extensive backcountry courses, including the study of avalanches. The duo began to feel confident that they would be able to navigate the glacial landscapes safely, and they embarked on their first ice cave adventure.

Ice caves in the Rockies

“Believe it or not, many of the ice caves in this area aren’t very crowded. Often you will be the only ones exploring them,” he says.

“There are several reasons for this. These caves are not easy to access, nor easy to find. And to find them, you need to have certain skills, like glacier and backcountry navigation.

As Aryanto had begun to learn these skills, he says it was extremely valuable to have a more experienced friend like Labbé-Doucet in the field with him to teach him first-hand.

Ice caves in the Rockies

“When I post pictures of ice caves, I often get a lot of direct messages asking me where they are. I don’t like giving places, because I’ve seen vandalized ice caves before. I still think that if you really have to work to find these amazing places, you have a much better chance of leaving no trace,” he says.

“Also, I don’t know the skill level of the people who want to go there. These ice caves can be difficult to find and you must have the knowledge and skills to explore them safely. The same philosophy applies. If you are willing to learn the necessary skills, it shows your commitment to navigating glaciers and ice caves in a safe and responsible way,” adds Aryanto.

“It’s important to understand all of the outside factors that go into researching and exploring ice caves,” Aryanto continues.

“The weather is a very important thing to study and understand before you go. Often you will need cross-country skis, snowshoes, or a split board to access these places, even in the fall or spring. And the most important lesson to learn before you even get on board is knowing when to turn around if conditions change. You must have a humble personality and recognize that you can come back another day. No picture is worth your life.

The first cave

“The first cave I explored with Ludo was in Banff National Park. We walked about 10 kilometers before seeing what was left of the entrance, which had largely collapsed. describes Aryanto.

Ice caves in the Rockies

“Ice caves can change wildly from year to year, even month to month or week to week,” Aryanto continues. “Once the temperature exceeds zero degrees Celsius, the ice can move. If you want to limit your chances of getting into a dangerous position of moving the ice while you’re in the cave, I recommend going early in the morning. This will allow you to get out and back safely before the air starts to heat up as the sun rises in the sky.

“With the small opening, we decided to only go in one at a time, so one of us would always be outside, just in case something went wrong. We were really surprised to see a bubble of methane in the ground, which gave me my favorite photo of this cave.

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

The second cave

“The second ice cave we found was another one that was about 20km of snow hiking, out and back, with a very small entrance. But for me, the most exciting part of this expedition was at the ‘outside the cave. Often times I enjoy the journey to get to my destination even more than the destination itself, and this trek was amazing. It was the first time I saw the huge wall of ice on the glacier “says Aryanto.

Ice caves in the Rockies

“This place was a good example of how to play it safe,” says Aryanto. “We could have gone further, to the next glacier, but we didn’t feel as confident with the layout, so we made the decision to play it safe and go back to our car.”

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

The third cave

“If you only saw the pictures from inside this ice cave, you would think the entrance was much bigger than it actually was, because we could barely see the crack in the ice then. as we get closer,” Aryanto says.

Ice caves in the Rockies

“Once inside, however, we realized just how vast this cave was. With the larger cave and the rounded ceiling, I knew this cave was perfect for a panoramic photo. For me, creating the dome effect with panning is much closer to what I was seeing with the naked eye, as opposed to a single photo,” says Aryanto.

Ice caves in the Rockies

“While I loved the panoramic photos, my favorite image of this cave is easily this perspective shot of Ludo as the light outside cascades over the cool blue ice,” says Aryanto.

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

The fourth cave

“This cave had a really crazy, gigantic opening, as opposed to the small openings we had found. While it was on the same glacier as the previous cave, it was on the opposite side, miles away. It was perhaps the most ‘epic’ of all the caves we had explored, as the openings were massive,” says Aryanto.

Ice caves in the Rockies

“This cave turned out to be a perfect example of how quickly these caves can change due to the elements,” Aryanto continues. “When we returned as winter gave way to spring, the entrances had completely collapsed. Looking at the wall of ice that now blocked the entrance to this special place, I was reminded of how lucky I was to to experience these natural wonders before they are gone forever.

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

Ice caves in the Rockies

More from Stanley Aryanto can be found on his website and instagram.


Picture credits: All pictures of Stanley Aryanto

Gabriel Ba, Dark Horse offers FCBD gift

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With June 22 here before you know it, Netflix is ​​starting to step up its game when it comes to the promotional machine for the upcoming third season of its adaptation of Gerard Road & Gabriel Bait is The Umbrella Academy. Right now, we’re nearing the end of the release of a series of key character profile art posters for our heroes and their Sparrow Academy counterparts. And while we wait for the official trailer (or at least an extended teaser) to release, we also know that the popular streaming series will be the focus of Netflix’s Geeked Week (June 6-10). And earlier today, we also learned that Dark Horse Comics and Ba will be giving away a free Comic Book Day giveaway to fans on Saturday, May 7, 2022 (in less than two weeks).

Image: Dark Horse/Gabriel Ba/Netflix

Here’s a preview of the announcement tweet from earlier with the good news:

Now here’s a look at the original teaser for the date announcement released last month confirming June 22, 2022, as well as the official season preview for Netflix. The Umbrella Academy:

After putting an end to the 1963 apocalypse, the Umbrella Academy returns home to the present, convinced that they have prevented the initial apocalypse and fixed this cursed timeline once and for all. But after a brief moment of celebration, they realize things aren’t quite (okay, not at all) the way they left them. Enter Sparrow Academy. Clever, elegant, and about as warm as a sea of ​​icebergs, the Sparrows immediately confront the Umbrellas in a violent confrontation that turns out to be the least of everyone’s worries. Navigating their own unique challenges, losses, and surprises – and facing an unidentified destructive entity wreaking havoc on the universe (something they may have caused) – now all that all they have to do is convince Dad’s new and possibly better family to help them right what their arrival has done wrong. Will they find their way back to their pre-apocalyptic life? Or is this new world about to reveal more than just a glitch in the timeline?

umbrella academy
cr. Courtesy of Netflix © 2022
umbrella academy
The Umbrella Academy. cr. Courtesy of Netflix © 2022

The Umbrella Academy stars Tom Hopper like Luther aka Spaceboy aka Number One, David Castaneda like Diego aka The Kraken aka Number Two, Emmy Raver Lampman like Allison aka The Rumor aka Number Three, Robert Sheehan like Klaus aka The Séance aka Number Four, Aidan Gallagher as Five aka The Boy, Justin H. Min like Ben aka The Horror aka Number Six/Ben aka Sparrow Number 2, Elliot Page like Viktor aka The White Violin aka Number Seven, Colm Feore as Sir Reginald Hargreeves, and Ritu Arya like Lilac. And speaking of Sparrow Academy, we also have Justin Cornwell as Marcus aka Number One, Britne Oldford as Fei aka Number Three, Jake Epstein like Alphonso aka Number Four, Genesis Rodriguez as Sloane aka Number Five, Cassie David as Jayme aka Number Six, and Psykronium cube inducing existential terror as Christopher aka Number Seven. Besides, Javon Walton (Euphoria, Utopia) joined the cast in an undisclosed role.

The Umbrella Academy Season 3: Gabriel Ba, Dark Horse offers a gift FCBD
Picture: Netflix

Created by showrunner and executive producer Blackman and produced by UCP (a division of Universal Studio Group) for Netflix, The Umbrella Academy is also produced by Jeff F. King, Keith Goldberg, Mike Richardson & Jeremy Webbwith Way & Ba co-executive production and Steve Wakefield produce.

Posted in: Netflix, Preview, streaming, TV | Tagged: fcbd, gabriel ba, netflix, preview, season 3, umbrella academy

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NASA extends exploration for 8 planetary science missions – Substantial potential for new discoveries

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An illustration shows our solar system (not to scale). Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Among the missions selected for expansion are InSight, " data-gt-translate-attributes="[{" attribute="">March Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Odyssey and Curiosity, all of which have been essential in expanding our understanding of the Red Planet.

After careful consideration, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an independent agency of the United States Federal Government that succeeded the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). It is responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research. It's vision is "To discover and expand knowledge for the benefit of humanity."

” data-gt-translate-attributes=”[{” attribute=””>Nasa extended the planetary science missions of 8 of its spacecraft because of their scientific productivity and their potential to advance our knowledge and understanding of the solar system and beyond.

The missions – Mars Odyssey, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, MAVEN, Mars Science Laboratory (Curiosity rover), InSight Lander, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, OSIRIS-REx and New Horizons – have been selected for pursuit, assuming their spacecraft remain in good health. health. Most assignments will be extended for 3 years; however, OSIRIS-REx will continue for 9 years in order to reach a new destination, and InSight will continue until the end of 2022, unless the electrical power of the craft allows longer operations.

Each extended mission proposal was reviewed by a panel of independent experts from academia, industry and NASA. In total, more than 50 reviewers assessed the scientific return of the respective proposals. Two independent review chairs oversaw the process and, based on the panel’s assessments, confirmed that these 8 science missions held substantial potential to continue to deliver new discoveries and address compelling new scientific questions.

In addition to providing significant programmatic benefits to NASA, several of these missions promise multidivisional science benefits across NASA’s Science Mission Directorate (SMD), including their use as data relays for landers. and Mars surface rovers, as well as to support other NASA initiatives such as Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS).

“Extended missions provide us with the opportunity to leverage NASA’s significant investments in exploration, allowing science operations to continue at a cost far below the cost of developing a new mission,” said Lori Glaze, director of the Planetary Science Division at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “Maximizing taxpayer dollars in this way allows missions to gain valuable new science data and, in some cases, allows NASA to explore new targets with entirely new science goals.”

Two of the extended missions, MAVEN and OSIRIS-REx, welcome new Principal Investigators (PIs).

NASA OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission

NASA OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

OSIRIS-APEX (Principal Investigator: Dr. Daniella DellaGiustina, University of Arizona): The Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, Security-Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx) mission is currently on its way back to Earth to deliver the samples from asteroid Bennu it collected in 2020. Dante Lauretta, OSIRIS- REx PI, will remain in place for the main mission, while DellaGiustina begins her role as newly appointed PI for OSIRIS-APophis EXplorer (OSIRIS-APEX). With a new name to reflect the new objectives of the extended mission, the OSIRIS-APEX team will redirect the spacecraft to encounter Apophis, an asteroid approximately 1,200 feet (about 370 meters) in diameter that will come within 20,000 miles (32,000 kilometers) from Earth in 2029. OSIRIS-APEX will enter orbit around Apophis shortly after the asteroid’s Earth flyby, providing an unprecedented close look at this S-type asteroid. It plans to study the changes in the asteroid caused by its close flyby of Earth and to use the spacecraft’s gas thrusters to attempt to dislodge and study dust and small rocks on and below Apophis’ surface.

NASA's MAVEN Mars spacecraft

This illustration shows NASA’s MAVEN spacecraft and the limb of Mars. Credit: NASA/Goddard

MAVEN (Principal Investigator: Dr Shannon Curry, University of California, Berkeley): The Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (MAVEN) mission plans to study the interaction between the atmosphere and the magnetic field of Mars during the next solar maximum. MAVEN’s observations as the Sun’s activity level increases toward the peak of its 11-year cycle will deepen our understanding of how Mars’ upper atmosphere and magnetic field interact with the Sun.

NASA Mars Insight

This illustration shows NASA’s Mars InSight lander on the Martian surface. Credit: NASA

InSight (Principal Investigator: Dr. Bruce Banerdt, JPL): Since landing on Mars in 2018, the Inland Exploration using Seismic, Geodetic and Heat Transport (InSight) mission has operated the only active seismic station beyond Earth. His seismic monitoring of “marsquakes” has provided constraints on the interior, formation and current activity of Mars. The extended mission will continue InSight’s seismic and weather monitoring if the spacecraft remains in good condition. However, due to dust accumulation on its solar panels, InSight’s power generation is low and the mission is unlikely to continue operations for the duration of its current extended mission unless its solar panels are cleaned by a “dust devil” passing on Mars. atmosphere.

NASA Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has been studying the Moon since June 2009. Credit: NASA

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) (Project Scientist: Dr Noah Petro, GSFC): LRO will continue to study the surface and geology of the Moon. The evolution of LRO’s orbit will allow it to study new regions far from the poles in unprecedented detail, including permanently shaded regions (PSRs) near the poles where water ice can be found. LRO will also provide significant programmatic support to NASA’s efforts to return to the Moon.

Curiosity Rock Hall Selfie

A selfie taken by NASA’s Curiosity rover on Sol 2291 at the “Rock Hall” drill site, located on Vera Rubin Ridge. The selfie is made up of 57 individual images taken by the rover’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), a camera on the end of the rover’s robotic arm. Credit: NASA/Caltech-JPL/MSSS

Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) (Project Scientist: Dr. Ashwin Vasavada, JPL): The Mars Science Laboratory and its Curiosity rover have traveled more than 27 km across the surface of Mars, exploring the history of habitability in Gale Crater. In its fourth extended mission, MSL will climb to higher altitudes, exploring critical sulfate-bearing layers that provide unique insight into the history of water on Mars.

New Horizons Spaceship

Artistic conception of the New Horizons spaceship. Credit: Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwestern Research Institute

New Horizons (Principal Investigator: Dr Alan Stern, SwRI): New Horizons flew over Pluto in 2015 and the Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) Arrokoth in 2019. In its second extended mission, New Horizons will continue to explore the distant solar system up to 63 astronomical units (AU) from Earth. The New Horizons spacecraft can potentially perform multidisciplinary observations relevant to the solar system and NASA’s heliophysical and astrophysical divisions. Additional details regarding New Horizons’ science plan will be provided at a later date.

Odyssey spacecraft above the south pole of Mars

NASA’s Mars Odyssey spacecraft passes over Mars’ south pole in this artist’s concept illustration. The spacecraft has been in orbit around Mars since October 24, 2001. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Mars Odyssey (Project Scientist: Dr. Jeffrey Plaut, JPL): The extended Mars Odyssey mission will perform new thermal studies of rocks and ice below the surface of Mars, monitor the radiation environment, and continue its long-running climate monitoring campaign. The Odyssey orbiter also continues to provide unique support for real-time data relay from other Mars spacecraft. Odyssey’s extended mission duration may be limited by the amount of propellant remaining on board the spacecraft.

Mars reconnaissance orbiter

This artist’s concept shows NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter above the Red Planet. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) (Project Scientist: Dr. Rich Zurek, JPL): MRO has provided a wealth of data regarding processes on the surface of Mars. In its sixth extended mission, MRO will study the evolution of the surface, ice, active geology, atmosphere and climate of Mars. In addition, MRO will continue to provide important data relay service to other Mars missions. The MRO’s CRISM instrument will be completely shut down, after the loss of its cryocooler put an end to the use of one of its two spectrometers.

NASA’s Planetary Science Division currently operates 14 spacecraft across the solar system, has 12 missions in formulation and implementation, and partners with international space agencies on seven others.

Detailed reports for the 2022 Higher Examination in Planetary Science can be found at:

https://science.nasa.gov/solar-system/documents/senior-review

Let’s talk about sustainable development: there are no regions untouched by man

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Once, when I was a small child visiting my grandmother in North Haven, I borrowed a book of photographs of Svalbard, an archipelago a few hundred miles south of the North Pole, from the community library.

I remember two things about the book. Firstly, the instant irony I felt when I learned that the main town in a region that was shrouded in darkness for nearly half the year was called “Longyearbyen” (“byen” in Norwegian meaning “the city”). I will learn later that the city is named after John Longyear, an American industrialist behind the Arctic Coal Company which began mining the Arctic islands at the turn of the 20th century.

The other aspect of the book that struck me is the remoteness of the region. The book’s curator has selected images that romanticize this distance: an area untouched by man, one in which mountain glaciers sparkle with golden light against the mauve glow of late winter, one where bear cubs twin polar bears fight by the sea near the remnants of a recent catch. Several years later, I began my own life in the polar regions as a climate advocate and researcher, drawn in part to challenge this romantic view of the north.

We may all be familiar with images of hungry polar bears and water gushing from glaciers. The Arctic is warming four times faster than the rest of the world and, in many ways, is the epicenter of the climate crisis. However, seeing the Arctic as inaccessible allows us to continue to tell that the climate crisis is happening in another space, at another time.

By the time this article is published, I will be alone, not far from the North Pole. All my possessions are in a sled, my red tent is on the ice floe and my neck is a swivel for polar bears. All around me are scenes that could very well have come from my library book. However, I’m not here for the romantic photos but for the plastic. The area is rarely visited by humans, but I find our fingerprints are everywhere. The plastic here comes from face scrubs, water pipes, fleeces and bottles that have been sent with letters on sea voyages.

On rest days, even at 82 degrees north, I use my iridium phone to break up any lonely feelings and connect to the world via Zoom. Many of my zooms will be with classrooms around the world for virtual excursions into the polar terrain, with researchers to link observations to satellite flybys, and with scientists to discuss airborne toxins. However, I will also speak with world leaders both at the UN and at the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos to demand the centrality of the Arctic in global climate negotiations.

One of the reasons to break this concept of remoteness is that many of the same systems transporting plastics and toxins to one of the most isolated places on earth are wreaking havoc in our own backyards. The Gulf of Maine is therefore warming faster than all the world’s oceans except 1%. We watched our shrimp industry shut down, we hauled tropical seahorses to Boothbay, while oyster shells didn’t harden.

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Whether it’s denim fibers embedded in the flesh of arctic fish or rising levels of methylmercury in pelagic predators in Maine, we can no longer think of the polar regions as foreign. The Amazon has long been considered the lungs of the world. We must now center the Polar Regions as the planetary core regulating circulatory systems around the globe. After all, everything is connected.

Valy Steverlynck is co-chair of the Freeport Sustainability Advisory Board and a member of the RSU 5 Sustainability Committee.

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Thousands of people protest against the plan to blow up an Austrian glacier to merge 2 ski resorts

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Bulldozers on an Austrian glacier. Credit: WWF

Thousands of people took to the streets of Innsbruck, Austria on Friday to protest against the planned destruction of a glacier to connect the ski resorts of Pitztal Glacier and Ötztal Glacier in Tyrol, Austria.

Plans involve blasting and removing more than 750,000 cubic meters of snow, rock and ice from the mountainside to create new ski runs and services, reports the The telegraph of the day.

A petition with more than 168,000 signatures and printed on a 60-foot roll has been delivered to the state government of Tyrol.

“For just five additional ski runs, ski resort operators want to block three glaciers intact. In doing so, they destroy the unique natural landscape of the high mountains, already threatened by global warming. This is negligence and we want to prevent that.

– Gerd Estermann, petition organizer

Proponents of the plan have been trying to get its approval since 2019, while the Austrian Alpine Association, nature lovers and the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) are demanding an immediate halt to development. At a 2019 press conference in Innsbruck, local alpine and nature conservation associations criticized the ecological myopia of the project plans. Animal species believed to be at risk include ibex, chamois, ptarmigan and black grouse, bearded vulture, golden eagle, mountain hare and marmot, the Telegraph adds.

Austria, Europe
The Austrian Alpine Protection Associations are demanding an immediate halt to the Austrian Pitztal-Ötztal glacier project. (Picture: Alpenverein / Benedikter)

The Pitztal-Ötztal Glacier Complex plans to level an area the size of 90 football pitches (64 hectares) on a wild and rugged glacier landscape to form ski slopes. For the construction of new buildings, two football fields (1.6 hectares) must be removed from the glacial ice. The mega-project has already begun, with bulldozers destroying an original glacier and high mountain landscape to create a new ski area for the benefit of mass tourism. Excavators dig into the ice of the glacier for snow groomers to distribute the snow to create slopes for the upcoming winter season.

“In the neighboring ski areas you can already see what the pristine glacier mountain threatens: a major annual construction site, where tourism works against nature instead of being with it. In addition to a courageous climate and environmental policy, we need effective glacier protection, which is implemented without exception.

– Josef Schrank, WWF expert

Today, only seven percent of Austria’s territory is largely natural and undeveloped. But the pressure of use and development on these last particularly precious alpine spaces is stronger than ever. For prestigious projects such as the Pitztal-Ötztal glacier, the precious landscape is destroyed forever.

“The installation of pristine glacial nature with energy-consuming infrastructure is emblematic of the failure of Austria’s climate and environmental policy: instead of looking holistically at the great challenges of our time – crisis climate change, biodiversity crisis and surface pollution – and at all levels there is negligent myopia on the part of decision makers.

The dredging and paving of a reservoir, the construction of buildings, cable cars, paths and slopes will inevitably mean the total loss of valuable alpine habitats. For the construction of the hill station, even a peak will be removed. Water drains for technical snowmaking, crossings and canalizations threaten to worsen the state of natural waters.

austria, austrian glacier, europe, glacier, glacier,
Austrian glacier Pitztal-Ötztal

Without comprehensive climate protection measures and further increase in global warming, all glaciers in the Alps could be largely gone by 2100. Therefore, instead of new tourist infrastructure, more comprehensive protection of the Alpine regions is needed, write the associations.

“It is incomprehensible that such destruction is accepted. The glaciers are melting under our feet. At the same time, pristine waterways are used to clear snow from glacier ski areas, and reservoirs have been built.

– Robert Renzler, General Secretary of the Austrian Alpine Club

With nearly 3,000 cable cars and ski lifts, Austria ranks just behind France for ski infrastructure and ahead of the United States.

Pitztal, Austria
Pitztal, Austria