Home Glaciers Heatwave causes ‘biggest glacier melt’ in Washington state

Heatwave causes ‘biggest glacier melt’ in Washington state

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The record-breaking heat wave in the northwestern United States and Canada is believed to have caused the largest glacier melt in Washington state in a century. According to Komo News reports, milky, sandy water flowed into Puget Sound, which is an inlet to the Pacific Ocean. Scientists said the rocks and minerals could come from melting glaciers.

The heat wave causes the glaciers to melt

Hundreds of deaths in Canada, Oregon and Washington linked to the heatwave, which broke all-time temperature records, have been reported. The extreme heat wave in the northwestern region of the United States and Canada is caused by a “heat dome”. The high temperature in the region is believed to have caused snow and ice to melt on Washington’s iconic Mount Rainier. University of Washington glacier and climate research assistant professor TJ Fudge told Komo News that this was the state’s largest glacier melt in about 100 years. Scott Pattee, of the Washington Snow Survey and Water Supply Forecasting, told Komo News that melting glaciers caused the milky waters below. Pattee revealed that 35 inches of snow melted in Paradise, west of Mount Rainier in just five days.

Scott Pattee told Kiro 7 News that before the heatwave there was 53 inches of snow on the ground. He revealed that to date there are 18 inches of snow left. National Weather Service warning coordinator meteorologist Reid Wolcott told Komo News that melting snow results in surface vegetation which increases the risk of fire. Wolcott pointed out that melting snow and glaciers cause rivers to rise.

Hundreds of heatwave-related deaths in Canada, Oregon and Washington, which broke all-time temperature records, have been reported. The scorching weather was caused by a “heat dome” stationed over the Pacific Northwest. The heat wave has led to an “unprecedented” number of people in hospitals, AP reported, citing a doctor who oversees Seattle’s busiest emergency room.

IMAGE: AP

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